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Vegetarian cookbook


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Good question, and there are loads of outstanding vegetarian cookbooks. To list a few: Vegetarian Times' own compilation, Vegetarian Times Complete Cooking; Najmieh Batmanglij's Silk Road Cooking: A Vegetarian Journey; Lorna Sass's Recipes from an Ecological Kitchen; Dana Jacobi's Amazing Soy; Rose Elliot's The Bean Book; Ken Charney's The Bold Vegetarian Chef; Charmaine Solomon's Complete Vegetarian Cookbook; Marie Oser's More Soy Cooking; and Anna Thomas' The New Vegetarian Epicure. Hard to know where to stop! Also, check our website, Vegetariantimes.com for more ideas on books and products. Thanks

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