Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Panaderia Canadiense

eG Foodblog: Panaderia Canadiense - Salt Cod, Squash, and Sweets: Semana Santa in the Sierra

Recommended Posts

34 minutes ago, Wayne said:

Very evocative blog and again great photos.

Brings back a lot of memories which trigger some questions. Apologies beforehand if they've already been covered.

Is Cuy popular in Ecuador? I remember eating a lot of it prepared many ways.

Coca leaves were almost always available in the Peruvian markets to be chewed as a mild stimulant with about the same effect as a double expresso or two. Always in the high altitude villages. Does/did the practice extend to Ecuador?

Other things are the sheer variety of potatoes available, ceviche, great tasting chicken and the variety of soup/stew combinations.

Sorry for rambling down memory lane  :D

Cheers.

 

Cuy is extremely popular here; in Ambato alone there are probably 20-30 places devoted to roasting and serving cuyes and rabbits.  You can also buy cuy, pre-peeled, whole or in parts, from the same butchers who specialize in rabbit in a couple of the mercados if you want to cook your own.  EDIT:  I actually wrote extensively about the hunt for a good cuy in my first foodblog here, five whole years ago - 

 

 

Coca leaves…. Perfectly legal to grow, chew, and offer to Pachamama; perfectly illegal to refine.  Highland Ecuadorians go more for coca tea than they do for direct chewing of the leaves; you get the same altitude-resistance effect, but your face doesn't go numb the same way, and it's less habit-forming.  Our highlands are actually a bit higher than Peru's, and for the residents of the highest paramos, coca tea is what keeps them alive.  I live at 3,000 meters above sea level; not the highest altitude available even in my own city, but not the lowest either.  I buy coca tea in convenient teabags at the supermarket, and I can buy coca-leaf lozenges at the health food store.  I use both when I want to do something really physically taxing, like set up for a tradeshow or hike up to the big flag across the valley from me, which is in the closest provincial park and marks a 4,000 m vista point.

 

And yes, chicken does taste very, very different in Ecuador than it does in either North America or Europe.  I think this comes down largely to the way it's raised and the way it's fed, although breed might play a part - North American chicken tends to be Cornish Rock if you don't raise your own; Ecuador at least is a majority farmer of Naked Neck (sometimes called Churkeys for their size) instead, because it's got better heat resistance than other breeds, but gets big just as fast.  I recall being extremely disappointed in chicken last time I was in Canada; it was bland and even the texture seemed off.

 

The soup war between Ecuador and Peru is ongoing.  I've lived, and eaten copiously, in both countries; I think Ecuador is the winner on sheer variety as well as on flavour - Peru relies too heavily on adding heat rather than paying attention to balanced flavours or nuance.


Edited by Panaderia Canadiense add link to cuy search. (log)
  • Like 7

Elizabeth Campbell, baking 10,000 feet up at 1° South latitude.

My eG Food Blog (2011)My eG Foodblog (2012)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for answering my many questions.

Forgot about the face numbing and the subsequent involuntary drooling :laugh:.

You're on the mark about commercial Canadian chicken but unless you raise your own or know someone we're stuck with them.

Although I love rabbit I don't remember eating any. More than likely because eating Cuy was such a new experience.

 

  • Like 1

I know it's stew. What KIND of stew?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Googled 'cuy'.  Guinea pigs.  Are there cuy farms?  Are they in cages?  Are they free roaming?  Is the pelt used for anything?  Any other facts we might be curious about?

  • Like 1

Darienne

learn, learn, learn...

Cheers & Chocolates

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Breadlympics progressed last night….

 

This is my alternative flours cupboard.  From left to right and back to front: gold pea, blue corn, whole wheat, baking soda; black cocoa, quick oats, quinua, amaranth.

CupboardGrains.jpg.dde846a26a2dfd83cbb38

 

Before I could go further, though, I needed to visit my local Tienda, just around the corner from me.  Carmita has had this place for 45 years and is a fixture of the community - it's where we all go to gossip and joke and just generally shoot the breeze.  She's like the barrio police; it's likely, if you grew up in the barrio, that she knows your mother or your grandmother, and she'll tell them that you're being a malcreado….

Tienda2.jpg.a5af2895d8c8c9dfa18aacf09295

 

The tienda, a fixture of every Ecuadorian barrio, stocks all the necessities - from napkins to noodles and tinned tuna fish.  I'm here to buy flats of eggs (there are 30 eggs to a flat) and bags of milk.  Carmita, shown here trying really hard not to laugh, says "hi" to all of you!  You can also see her daughters and granddaughters.  Luz, laughing in the background, will take over the tienda from Carmita when she retires.

Tienda.jpg.3868c31e9cb135bfe0f870654eb8e

 

Breadlympics progresses - the four bowls of challah-type bread have butter worked into them, and you can see why I needed to buy a few flats of eggs.

Breadlypmics2.jpg.3fab28506f1a0a7a8f237e

 

On the far right, that super-full bowl (my largest one) is herb focaccia dough.

Breadlympics3.jpg.f41448367f8b61223d9b40

 

It's the reason I have a docking wheel.  This is such a popular bread in Baños that I produce somewhere between 1 and 3 batches of it a week; some of it is baked into large loaves for sandwich bread, but I've got a few diehards who prefer the more traditional flatbread style.  The docking wheel is an invaluable tool and saves me a lot of time and effort.

DockingWheel.jpg.7a044c6d117b7e8d0222e75

 

While all of this was going on, I also proved how Canadian I still am at heart.  Dinner was real honest-to-goodness orange, gooey Mac and Cheese from a box, with some tomato sauce and ground chicken thrown on top.

ProveCanadian.jpg.2c474b88465d90bec01207

 

Some finished items in the Breadlympics event: cinnamon buns

CinnBuns.jpg.01852e71333c03bf44c9d2460ad

 

Bagels and injerto buns

Bread-finished.jpg.c366e087bd4c07be14035

 

At the end of the night I'm achy and exhausted.  This means only one thing - it's time for Jello!  But maybe not the way you'd think….  My great-grandmother swore by a cup of hot gelatine at night when she felt creaky - she swore it was good for her arthritis.  She was right!  A mug of hot Jello, in this case pineapple-cherry flavoured, is a fantastic sedative and when you wake up your joints have ceased to hurt.  Mom and I both partook.

Jello.jpg.613ec2fb736d7a732514d9a37ce32f


Edited by Panaderia Canadiense (log)
  • Like 12

Elizabeth Campbell, baking 10,000 feet up at 1° South latitude.

My eG Food Blog (2011)My eG Foodblog (2012)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 minutes ago, Darienne said:

Googled 'cuy'.  Guinea pigs.  Are there cuy farms?  Are they in cages?  Are they free roaming?  Is the pelt used for anything?  Any other facts we might be curious about?

 

There are cuy farms, especially in neighbouring Cevallos canton where there's a county fair each year to choose the best of them.  They're generally free-ranged in the day and have hutches, kind of like bunnies do, for the nighttime.  A small percentage of the herd is lost to hawks.  Pelts aren't used - cuy skin is prized for its taste and crunch, so they're treated like hogs, and shaved, scalded, and singed instead.

 

Live cuy come to market in crates; best-in-show cuy live pampered lives in cages and are generally breeding stock.  Ginger-coat and pale cuy are the most prized.  Paradoxically, even though they're known to be a food animal first, many people keep cuy as pets as well.

IMG_0323.thumb.JPG.4ee69c287b18558f2ccb3

 

Best in Show, Cevallos 2015

IMG_0334.thumb.JPG.94f9c925df1556104e627

 

Biggest Pig, Cevallos 2015

IMG_0336.thumb.JPG.d3a1d6b93decf83a748d8

  • Like 6

Elizabeth Campbell, baking 10,000 feet up at 1° South latitude.

My eG Food Blog (2011)My eG Foodblog (2012)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, SylviaLovegren said:

What are the big squashy-melony looking things on the bottom of the picture, next to the figs (?) ?

 

These ones?

FigsAndSquash.jpg.ac0174c7682b194a12986e

 

They're Zambos, Cucurbita ficifolia, aka Cidra, or Blackseed Figleaf gourds.  Squashy-melony things is actually a very accurate description - when they're underripe, like the ones here, they're sort of stringy squashy tasting and excellent for soups.  When they're ripe they're melony-sweet and make lovely jam, and the seeds at any stage of ripeness are delicious when toasted - kind of like stronger-tasting pumpkin seeds.

  • Like 4

Elizabeth Campbell, baking 10,000 feet up at 1° South latitude.

My eG Food Blog (2011)My eG Foodblog (2012)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A few questions:

- do you have pantry bugs, like ants?

- you are in danger of losing your "Canadian" status, calling Kraft Dinnner (KD) mac and cheese.  Can you buy KD in Ambato?  Is it the same formula if you can?

- is your jello drink actually Jello?

- are you going to fall into an exhausted heap when your blog is finished?  :x

  • Like 3

Darienne

learn, learn, learn...

Cheers & Chocolates

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, Darienne said:

A few questions:

- do you have pantry bugs, like ants?

- you are in danger of losing your "Canadian" status, calling Kraft Dinnner (KD) mac and cheese.  Can you buy KD in Ambato?  Is it the same formula if you can?

- is your jello drink actually Jello?

- are you going to fall into an exhausted heap when your blog is finished?  :x

 

I've got silverfish in my pan cupboard, but thankfully this house is ant-free - something I could not say of the last one, where I swore and snarled and nuked the Crazy Ants in the walls what felt like every single day.  The biggest nuisance in the house is standard black houseflies, and I have a good swatter and a plastic-strip door cover, so I don't have to use it very often.

 

I can buy KD in Ambato; it's a slightly different formula (more actual cheese in the sauce, less "processed cheese food substance"), but it's also $4 a box.  Instead, I buy the 79 cent SuperMaxi brand Mac and Cheese - hence, in the pursuit of accuracy, I'm not calling it KD.  Because of Ecuadorian food labelling laws, anything calling itself Mac and Cheese has to have at least 75% real cheese, freeze-dried and powdered, in the sauce pack.  Resultantly, and I'm going to commit a bit of sacrilege here that I think I can get away with because I'm also Ecuadorian, I like the SuperMaxi brand stuff better.

 

Technically it's Royal and not Jello, but that amounts to the same thing under a different brand name.  Cherry-pineapple isn't actually a flavour you can buy ready-mixed - I have two of the big family-size bags open right now and I blend it myself.  Mom likes 1 TBSP pineapple to 1/2 TBSP cherry; I like it reversed.

 

When the blog is finished?  I fall down into an exhausted heap every single night!  I'm just sharing the madness right now is all.

  • Like 7

Elizabeth Campbell, baking 10,000 feet up at 1° South latitude.

My eG Food Blog (2011)My eG Foodblog (2012)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

some where on eG there  are a few pics of someone sampling Guy in a restaurant.

 

I take it from those pics that guy in this case are quite large, much larger than what one thinks of here as a pet.


Edited by rotuts (log)
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, rotuts said:

some where on eG there is are a few pics of someone sampling Guy in a restaurant.

 

I take it from those pics that guy in this case area quite large, much larger than what one thinks of here as a pet.

 

The biggest pig?  He weighed in at 15 lbs or some such incredible weight - about the size of an overweight domestic cat or a small poodle.  You can see a more normally sized cuy in the cage with him, getting all smooshed.

  • Like 4

Elizabeth Campbell, baking 10,000 feet up at 1° South latitude.

My eG Food Blog (2011)My eG Foodblog (2012)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just a quick note before I run off to Baños for the day.  This was the final tally of yesterday's production; not pictured are three large cakes - Mocha, Carrot, and Chocolate.

 

Breadlympics-final.jpg.e9cd40583322b45a3

CinnBuns-finished.jpg.216a1c4cf16924b463

CinnBuns-individuals.jpg.dad81d89353d06a

Cookies.jpg.726d379d4fadd7450bf927425bd6

Packing1.jpg.951df4622305a6ab6051dfe160c

Packing2.jpg.8b5e782faebb23510e96d13c187

 

This is three apple-boxes worth of products, plus a stuffed basket and a cake box on the side.  I'll be back this evening with a giant update covering Baños de Agua Santa and what an out-of-town delivery round looks like.

  • Like 15

Elizabeth Campbell, baking 10,000 feet up at 1° South latitude.

My eG Food Blog (2011)My eG Foodblog (2012)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm curious, because I have a bag of it in my cupboard which I bought without really thinking about what I was going to do with it - what do you use black cocoa for?

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
20 hours ago, ElsieD said:

I'm curious, because I have a bag of it in my cupboard which I bought without really thinking about what I was going to do with it - what do you use black cocoa for?

 

Everything!  The difference between black cocoa and Dutched cocoa is that one is naturally acidic and fat-soluble, and the other alkalinized and water-soluble.  Black cocoa is a bit richer-tasting in final goods, more like eating cocoa nibs, and imparts a far more intense colour to the final product.  The black-black colour of my mocha leaf cookies, chocolate cakes, and black bread, comes from black cocoa.  The only thing it won't do is make a Devil's Food Cake come out that rich red-brown - for that, which relies on a reaction with the alkaline, you have to use Dutched.

  • Like 3

Elizabeth Campbell, baking 10,000 feet up at 1° South latitude.

My eG Food Blog (2011)My eG Foodblog (2012)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sorry about the lack of posts yesterday evening, folks - a combination of coming home late and a power outage meant I had a snack and fell into bed.  Here, now, is the experience of travelling to Baños de Agua Santa.

 

Let's start with breakfast.  The bus we were trying to catch was late, so breakfast came from the lone kiosk in the station parking lot.  It doesn't look like much, but it turns out excellent fast food, Ecuadorian-style - Daniela primarily serves bus drivers and swampers.

BreakfastKiosk.jpg.d3e2063979df26f5cdd26

 

On the left, Salchipapas; on the right, Papipollo.  The first is small beef sausages fried with the fresh chips, and all hidden here under a mound of onion, tomato, and lettuce salad, and the kiosk's home-made mayo and ketchup.  The second is a quarter chicken with fries, also obscured under its sauces.


Salchipapas and Papipollo are the kind of portmanteaux common in Ecuadorian Spanish - the first is properly Salchis y Papas (little sausages and potatoes), and the second Papas y Pollo (Potatoes and Chicken)  On the menu, you can also see that Papicarne (Papas y carne, which is potatoes with a bun-less hamburger on top) is available.

Breakfast.jpg.6c602e850b8360c3551fce6bef

 


Edited by Panaderia Canadiense grammar! (log)
  • Like 11

Elizabeth Campbell, baking 10,000 feet up at 1° South latitude.

My eG Food Blog (2011)My eG Foodblog (2012)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I like the way food is presented in bag, which you eat out off.

 

nice.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, you get the doggie bag at the onset and don't have to ask for it at the end.  Time saver.  

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Baños, properly called Nuestra Señora del Virgen de los Baños de Agua Santa, is a hot-springs town about an hour's bus-ride from Ambato.  What the map can't show you is that in that hour, you lose half the altitude.  Baños is nestled on the toes of Volcán Tungurahua, at the edge of lava cliffs, just below the headwaters of the Pastaza River, a major Amazon tributary.

BanosMap.thumb.png.f7da62805f70298395c77

 

To get there, one passes through a lot of Ecuador's most fertile farmland and the towns of Salasaka (Google has it spelled wrong!) and Pelileo.  I have no pictures of Salasaka, because we passed it at high speeds.  Pelileo, the second largest town in the province, is still so well-attached to its agricultural roots that people have small farms within city limits.  It's about the last really flat arable land as you head towards the jungle, and even it is terraced broadly on the hillsides.

Pelileo2.jpg.19e1b403862fecc93292952347e

 

This is two blocks from Pelileo's City Hall, if you can believe it!  Llamas and Alpacas are raised both for their wool and their meat.

Alpacas.jpg.458bfe4fd9cc15905e65d8ec1fc9

Pelileo.jpg.9fd6530de166e8104f1f55e6dd2c

 

As you keep heading downwards it just gets steeper - Ecuadorians, and particularly Tungurahuans, consider any land that isn't quite vertical as plantable.  In some places, like Guadalupe, you can see where the town has scraped itself a flat space, and across the river where farmers are growing mandarines and limes on 60 degree inclined slopes.  Above that cloud line are corn and bean fields.  Guadalupe is home to one of the country's large poultry operations; the birds are pen-ranged on non-rainy days in the fields below the barns.

Guadalupe.jpg.52a42a8044617c5b527605c524

 

Pingue.jpg.27789330823c19dbc54861a299343

 

The entire sector between Pelileo and Baños, although it contains a lot of small towns of other names, is usually referred to as Valle Hermoso (Beautiful Valley) - of course, today it was raining so I can't show you how it got that name!  In the sunshine the views from any part of the valley are heart-stoppingly gorgeous, particularly when Volcán Tungurahua is erupting.  Valle Hermoso is a stretch of about 50km of the most fertile soils in the country, thanks to the volcano's liberal gifts of ash.  Everything is grown here, from mote corn and squashes to tomate de árbol (tree tomatoes) and babaco, and the area is overrun with fruit orchards producing the country's best avocados, mandarines, limes, pears, peaches, and other stonefruits.

Pingue2.jpg.c89b49ab85be453eb14224293ce6

ValleHermoso.jpg.67852f197361a6ed6cc2d0a

 

Along the roadside as you approach the floodplains of the Rio Patate there are all manner of small nurseries that provide seedlings for the annual and biennial crops grown in the region.  This one also has ornamentals, but its main focus is seedlings of tomate de árbol and tree tobacco.

ValleHermoso2.jpg.8207448a7b5ddb86f4a76f

 

Despite landslides, farmers replant and carry on - new orchards appear in place of the old ones.

Triunfo.jpg.6ba6affee370fdcd88c79bbb593a

 

Baños is nestled on these cliffs, a bit further to the left of this view.

BanosGateway1.jpg.98897b07afb4990d5b0adb

BanosGateway.jpg.aa98fcc3cfaf46e634d332a

  • Like 12

Elizabeth Campbell, baking 10,000 feet up at 1° South latitude.

My eG Food Blog (2011)My eG Foodblog (2012)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, rotuts said:

I like the way food is presented in bag, which you eat out off.

 

nice.

 

It's part of the country's dedication to low-waste and low-impact environmental solutions.  Those bags are not petro-polymers; they're fully biodegradable plantain plastic. Also, it's compact and easy to eat out of, and on a chilly day like yesterday it warms up your hands for you - no downside at all!

  • Like 12

Elizabeth Campbell, baking 10,000 feet up at 1° South latitude.

My eG Food Blog (2011)My eG Foodblog (2012)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

And now we've reached Baños!  Someone a while ago asked about my expat clients; a large percentage of them are here, and most of them are long-term residents.  They're also from a huge range of countries, not just North America.  My first delivery goes to Danish-Ecuadorian Vibeke at Café Ali Cumba, someone that people who read my first foodblog might remember.  She's been here for 17 years and works the café with her Ecuadorian husband.

I've been working with Vibeke now for 5 years, and she's upgraded her digs from a small shop on the central square to a beautiful restored historical house near the Cathedral.  I would have stayed longer and had a cup of her excellent coffee and probably a sandwich, but she was on her way up to Ambato with her kids to see a movie.  She got the boxed cakes and a loaf of bread, and is now set for the holiday weekend crowds.

AliCumba-Outside.jpg.ed08bd42645417661ad

AliCumba-Inside.jpg.483706da06088c931835

 

Next up was the hands-down best coffeeshop in Baños, which, in typical Ecuadorian style, is tucked away inside an art-supply shop and bookstore.  Things are often hidden this way - I buy yarn at my cheese shop, and oil paints at the café, and it's a perfectly normal to do.  Arte-Ilusiones is the brainchild of Danish-Ecuadorian Nynne, who's been here for 12 years and has a lovely Ecuadorian husband who's a silversmith.

ArteIlusiones.jpg.7b151bba094dc83c6bfd05

Nynne.jpg.3be10e108a4aaae363174482d7a4ac

 

Not pictured is her impressive cabinet of goodies, about half of which are mine.  All of those loose cookies, the single-packed cinnamon buns, the brownies, and a lot of bread for her family besides, are staying here.  Nynne also graciously allows me to use her café as a meeting point for other clients in Baños, with the result that Wednesdays are quite busy days for her.

 

Next up was part social call, part business, on my friends Geoffrey and Edith.  They're massage therapists.  I was in luck, because Geoffrey (US expat, here for nearly 35 years; he's lost count) was out of drinking water and needed to visit the spring that Baños is named for!  Most people assume it's the thermal baths, but it's actually the cool, refreshing mineral waters that come from a rock spring at the foot of a waterfall, that gave the town its name; apparently parched and disoriented conquistadores had a vision of the Virgin Mary here that told them to drink the waters and be healed.  There's a small shrine around the spring, which is open to the public to fill up their jugs for free (although donations or offerings are welcome.)

Springs1.jpg.84f4e6cb528c13a3c4ace37272e

Springs-above.jpg.c63fd30ea79aba34373390

 

The Springs of the Virgin are popular with both locals and tourists, and a minor pilgrimage destination for the aged and infirm.

Springs4.thumb.jpg.f18fe52f643bd32a72007

 

Geoffrey had a treat for me - a fruit called Limón del Monte that he'd bought of an old Quichua man from up near the blueberry forest.

LimonMonte-outside.jpg.2676ecdb937d8e54b

 

You suck the pulp off the three big seeds, and try to avoid eating the latex exuded by the yellow shell, which is a bit bitter.  The flavour is citric and very refreshing, and it's hard to stop eating the fruits once you've started.  Neither Geoffrey nor I know exactly what this fruit is; we assume it to be related to Mangosteen based on how the seeds and pulp are arranged, and on the latex that comes out of the shells.  My best guess is Garcinia madruno.

LimonMonte-inside.jpg.1600d95094e6d828d2

 

After visiting with Geoffrey and Edith, and having my weekly massage (which is vital if you make as much bread by hand as I do) it was time to head for the last delivery of the day, bread for gourmet sandwiches at the Stray Dog Brewpub.  Jason, the proprietor, is about my age and brings in the best of Ecuador's microbrews - this is where the ales of Ecuador are hiding out.  Selection of beers changes here from day to day, depending on what he's got in kegs.  I had the Saison Farmhouse Ale, which was a bitter, lightly sour gold ale; Mom went for Llama's Breath, a mild-tasting Belgian Blonde.

StrayDog.jpg.6f5d531aa622434e4be5db7da71

 

And the final stop was at Heladería DaLeo - this is a place known for unusual flavours of artisanal ice-cream.  Stalin, the proprietor, has some "normal" flavours in the case this time - you can see coconut, mandarine, and taxi here; but he's also got some unorthodox ones, like pumpkin, cane juice, yellow dragonfruit, and my personal favourite, beet (which I got and promptly forgot to photograph in my enthusiasm!)

DaLeo1.jpg.f01f6350ac9d4c2ce9568c3fda2c4

 

The second case also has Yuca (tapioca), Chontaduro (palm peach), and Hierba Luisa (lemongrass).  Flavours at DaLeo change daily and depend heavily on what's in season right now - I was hoping to find my absolute favourite, Motilón (Peruvian elderberry) but was sadly out of luck this time.

DaLeo2.jpg.c500c3d8863fce9cf6f768a53022d

  • Like 16

Elizabeth Campbell, baking 10,000 feet up at 1° South latitude.

My eG Food Blog (2011)My eG Foodblog (2012)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When I finally got home, exhausted, the power was out; it came back briefly enough for me to make dinner, then died again.  Dinner, when I'm exhausted, is usually tuna salad on a bagel.  In this case, I also had some bacon and sour cream Lay's to go with it.  Then I collapsed into an exhausted heap - and here I am at 10 am the next day updating you all!

 

Dinenr2.jpg.f9b04d3e5c37d9bfa6d028f41974

Dinner1.thumb.jpg.c52471e6ac632e9e031bdb

  • Like 11

Elizabeth Campbell, baking 10,000 feet up at 1° South latitude.

My eG Food Blog (2011)My eG Foodblog (2012)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wow, that's like 2 marathons in a row:  a baking marathon followed by the delivery marathon!   Thanks for taking all the photos along the way and updating us!

 

  • Like 7

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah, and I have today off!  This, of course, means I'm going to hijack my mother and we'll go off in search of the perfect bowl of Fanesca.  I'm also going to try and make it to the butcher's for some lamb.

  • Like 5

Elizabeth Campbell, baking 10,000 feet up at 1° South latitude.

My eG Food Blog (2011)My eG Foodblog (2012)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm exhausted just reading about your schedule, but everything looks so lovely and delicious that I'm deeply grateful you provided the pictorial update. I remain in awe at the quantity and quality of baked goods that come from your kitchen!

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, Panaderia Canadiense said:

 

Everything!  The difference between black cocoa and Dutched cocoa is that one is naturally acidic and fat-soluble, and the other alkalinized and water-soluble.  Black cocoa is a bit richer-tasting in final goods, more like eating cocoa nibs, and imparts a far more intense colour to the final product.  The black-black colour of my mocha leaf cookies, chocolate cakes, and black bread, comes from black cocoa.  The only thing it won't do is make a Devil's Food Cake come out that rich red-brown - for that, which relies on a reaction with the alkaline, you have to use Dutched.

 

Thank you for answering.  Do you use an equal substitution?  By that I mean, if I make something that calls for 1/4 cup cocoa powder, would I use the full 1/4 black cocoa in it's place?

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.

  • Similar Content

    • By Kerry Beal
      @Alleguede and I are in the lounge at Pearson awaiting our flight to Vegas for the IBIE (International Baking Industry Exhibition).
       
      I got the usually bomb sniffing swab done on my electronics - @Alleguede got the 3rd degree at customs. Anyone know what a carnet is? I believe I got that lecture the last time.
       

       
      Made myself a little cocktail, Maker's Mark, Grand Marnier, vintage port. I've had better! 
       

       
      Not a lot of choices to eat since it's rather late (not that earlier would have helped) - they also have pasta salad, Italian Wedding soup, Cream of mushroom soup, corn chips and salsa. There appear to be some cookies there as well. I'm trying to low carb as much as possible so I'm avoiding most of it.
       

       
       
       
       
       
       
       
       
    • By ElsieD
      Host's note: the initial title of this thread was "Swarvin' in ???"  as a teaser.  Once the destination was identified as Newfoundland, the title was changed to reflect this.  The initial comments were based on the ??? In the title.
       
       
      And we'll soon be off.......culinary adventures to follow.

    • By ElsieD
      Some of you may recall that in 2016 I had a blog about our trip to Newfoundland.  We are going there again tomorrow for a week, returning July 1 and I thought that since we are going to, and eating at, places different from that year, I would do another blog.  When I booked our flights and accommodations (7 places in 8 nights) last February, June 23rd seemed like a long ways away.  Yet here we are, about to leave.   I hope some of you will follow along as we travel through the province.    
    • By Smithy
      As times and available resources have changed, members have started their own food/travel blogs. These are not listed in the eG Foodblogs index below. You can find them, though, by searching with the tag "foodblog". The tag search box is near the upper right corner of the Forums Main Page. It looks like this:
       

    • By rarerollingobject
      In December, I spent 3 glorious weeks eating my way through Japan; Tokyo, Kanazawa, Kyoto, Sapporo, Hakodate and back to Tokyo. It was my 11th (!) trip to Japan but my mother had never been, so I thought I'd take the old girl over for a good time. We did not kill each other, surprisingly.
       
      I'll come back and caption these a little more informatively over coming weeks, but as you can see, we ate rather a lot. 

      Midori Sushi, Mark City, Shibuya (always my first stop when I arrive in Tokyo, as my preferred hotel is directly above it)
       

      Toro tuna belly,  Midori Sushi, Mark City, Shibuya
       

      Squid gristle for snack time (as you do)
       

      Uni tempura, Tsunahachi, Shinjuku
       

      Uni tempura, Tsunahachi, Shinjuku
       

      Eel, fish and scallop tempura, Tsunahachi, Shinjuku
       

      Clam meat, chopped, stuffed back in clam shell and tempura'd, Tsunahachi, Shinjuku
       

      Crab leg tempura, Tsunahachi, Shinjuku
       

      Maitake mushroom (a cluster of them) tempura, Tsunahachi, Shinjuku
       

      Squid, prawn which had been alive right up until this point, lotus root tempura, dipping sauce, radish and green tea salt, 
      Tsunahachi, Shinjuku
       

      Prawn head tempura, 
      Tsunahachi, Shinjuku
       

      Evening hotel room snack - an AUD$15 tray of uni from Isetan depachika (food basement), Shinjku
       

      Amaebi (sweet raw prawn) gunkan sushi from Umegaoka Sushi No Midori Sohonten, Shibuya
       
      '
      Engawa (flounder fin), lightly grilled, 
      Umegaoka Sushi No Midori Sohonten, Shibuya
       

      Otoro, chutoro and akami tuna, 
      Umegaoka Sushi No Midori Sohonten, Shibuya
       

      Marinated raw baby squid sushi, 
      Umegaoka Sushi No Midori Sohonten, Shibuya
       

      Otoro fatty tuna belly and minced daikon (takuan), 
      Umegaoka Sushi No Midori Sohonten, Shibuya
       

      Fried oysters, 
      Umegaoka Sushi No Midori Sohonten, Shibuya
       

      Negitoro - fatty minced tuna belly and green onion,
      Umegaoka Sushi No Midori Sohonten, Shibuya
       

      Salmon, flounder fin and tuna belly aburi (lightly grilled), 
      Umegaoka Sushi No Midori Sohonten, Shibuya
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...