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korhan

Melted Chocolate Weight to Volume Calculation

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Hi eveyone,

Is there a simple way of accurate calculation of melted chocolate's weight to volume? I simply use 1/1, 1 gr to 1 cm3 bu I think it is a little bit different what I do. For example if I prepare 400 gr. of ganache I use 20*10*2 cm (400 cm3) frame to pour.

Thanks.

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Hmmm, so it should be measured for every type of ganache, right? There ise no approximate ratio like 1.25/1 or 1/1?

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WolframAlpha lists the density of (milk) chocolate at 0.71 g/cm3. There's a drop down box where you can choose from among many brands, but these seem to take their data from the nutritional information data which doesn't provide the volume measurement necessary to calculate density.

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It's too bad there isn't an easy way to calculate the volume--for the simple reason that, in three recent cases, from recipes from two expert chocolatiers, the volume of the ganache has not matched the size of the frame specified. That is to say, the author may call for a 12" x 12" x 1/2" frame, and the ganache resulting from the recipe doesn't fill up the frame (it doesn't matter so much when the recipe exceeds the dimensions, but I haven't had that happen). But I don't see any solution except to calculate the volume of the frame and then pour the ganache into a measuring cup. There are conversion calculators on the web--for example, to determine how many fluid ounces it takes to fill up x number of cubic inches/centimeters.

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Even when dealing with one manufacturer, there are often a dozen or more types produced. Many make chips designed for cookies, baking bars, and several grades of couveture per type of chocolate. Every one of these will have a different split.

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I usually make a recipie, slab it, and note if it fills a 12 x 12 frame. If it does, how much is left over? I calculate how much of a percentage this is and next batch I adjust accordingly. 5-7% excess is acceptable

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thanks for the answers...

So I need to recalculate my recipes if I change the type of couverture.

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If you know/calculate the cubic capacity of your tray, and you have have an accurate measuring container (e.g. marked lab beaker), you can then translate the milliletres into cubic inches or centimetres (e.g. 50 mL = 50 cc/3.051 cubic inches). From the two measurements, you can determine how the chocolate is going to fit into the tray.

You can you use this conversion calculator: http://www.onlineconversion.com/weight_volume_cooking.htm


Michaela, aka "Mjx"
Manager, eG Forums
mscioscia@egstaff.org

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