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using goose eggs in baking


HungryC
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I use duck eggs regularly in baking, but not goose eggs. The duck egg yolks have more fat per gram than chicken eggs and the whites have more albumin per gram. As a result, baked goods are noticably fluffier.

I found this document which looks like it will most likely tell you the albumin and fat breakdown of a goose egg, but it is quite riddled with ads so I lost my patience looking. It looks like that information is somewhere around the 40 page mark.

http://www.scribd.com/doc/30164876/EGG-AND-EGG-PRODUCTS

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Ciao. I've had some goose egg experience. http://bit.ly/hSX7FR

The tricky part is that they are higher in protein, so that may affect what you are doing.

I used them for pasta and they were excellent, but definitely required special handling.

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When I have used goose eggs in baking, I have to shorten the baking time quite a bit, or cakes come out overdone and dry. I don't know whether this is because goose eggs have a higher protein content, as hathor said, or because they set at a lower temperature than chicken eggs, or some other reason, but I've consistently experienced that difference.

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