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Molasses


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...mmmm...baked beans....have to remember to make those more often...

Thanks for the heads-up!

I have purchased 5 Brer Rabbit recipe pamphlets of varying ages and a hard-bound cookbook from the 1960's and none of these has the brownie recipe I am looking for. They have recipes, one of the pamphlets has a no-chocolate recipe, but none of them are the right one. It's notable because it has just one egg. I'll probably just have to try and re-formulate it on my own. (It didn't use weight for flour anyway, so I have a pretty good chance at getting something close.)

Thanks again, though!

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...mmmm...baked beans....have to remember to make those more often...

Thanks for the heads-up!

I have purchased 5 Brer Rabbit recipe pamphlets of varying ages and a hard-bound cookbook from the 1960's and none of these has the brownie recipe I am looking for. They have recipes, one of the pamphlets has a no-chocolate recipe, but none of them are the right one. It's notable because it has just one egg. I'll probably just have to try and re-formulate it on my own. (It didn't use weight for flour anyway, so I have a pretty good chance at getting something close.)

Thanks again, though!

I wonder if you started with a blondie recipe and added the molasses if you'd get something similar.

Butterscotch Squares

Submitted by: Kerry Beal

Keywords: Brownies/Bars

My mom's recipe book called them Marge's Butterscotch Squares, Maggiethecat knew them as Irma's Butterscotch Squares

1/2 c butter

1 c brown sugar

1 large egg

1 c flour

1 tsp baking powder

1/2 tsp salt

2 tsp vanilla

1/2 c pecans

Melt butter, stir in brown sugar, then eggs and remaining ingredients. Pour into greased 8x8 inch pan. Bake at 325 for 15 minutes, then turn off the heat and leave in the oven for another 20 minutes.

Maybe start with this one, and cut back the brown sugar to 1/2 a cup, add 1/2 a cup of molasses and see what you come up with.

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I've always preferred honey to molasses in gingerbread. Flavor and mouthfeel. Honey is sort of silkier, if that's a word.

On the other hand, I prefer molasses to sugar when sweetening my southern style greens.

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Sorry, if I wasn't clear. I am looking for a chocolate brownie recipe that used to be on the bottle of Brer Rabbit dark molasses. IIRC, it used one egg.

The only thing I could find that resembled your request used a brownie mix.

clickity

Shelley: Would you like some pie?

Gordon: MASSIVE, MASSIVE QUANTITIES AND A GLASS OF WATER, SWEETHEART. MY SOCKS ARE ON FIRE.

Twin Peaks

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Sorry, if I wasn't clear. I am looking for a chocolate brownie recipe that used to be on the bottle of Brer Rabbit dark molasses. IIRC, it used one egg.

The only thing I could find that resembled your request used a brownie mix.

clickity

Saw that one - I for some reason thought she was looking for one without chocolate - my bad!

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So many molasses lovers -- hooray!!!

In The American History Cookbook (MarK Zanger), Mark notes a recipe for a children's beverage mixing a tablespoon (or two) with 12 ounces water. Since molasses does contain many nutrients, I can see how this would be a healthful drink.

mkayahara: funny you should mention cartons vs. bottles. I just moved to Canada (BC) from California and grew up with molasses in glass bottles. When I went shopping for molasses the other day, I was surprised to only find it in cartons here ;-)

In the states, the two brands which I remember being most common are Brer Rabbit and Grandma's (both owned by the same company now).

Another difference I noticed are the grades of Molasses at the store -- 'Fancy' and 'Cooking' -- not entirely sure how to interpret these. Unfortunately, the packaging doesn't give any insight into what makes one 'fancy' - I assume it's better quality and best used in non-cooked applications.

In the states, I always remember them being distinguished by mild vs robust.

Allen

------------------------------------------------------------

Eating Out Loud - eating, baking & cooking

Recovered Recipes - vintage recipe cards

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Another difference I noticed are the grades of Molasses at the store -- 'Fancy' and 'Cooking' -- not entirely sure how to interpret these.  Unfortunately, the packaging doesn't give any insight into what makes one 'fancy' - I assume it's better quality and best used in non-cooked applications.

According to the Crosby's website, cooking molasses is a blend of fancy and blackstrap. The cooking is darker/stronger and less sweet, making it better for cooking. The fancy is lighter and sweeter, better for baking.

eta: Crosby's is the brand I usually see in stores here, in cartons. And I'm a big fan of molasses. Gingerbread is a favourite.

Edited by Pam R (log)
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In my earlier post I mentioned sorghum. I should have noted that I also buy "Black Treacle" and "dark ribbon cane molasses, no sulphur" one a British import and the other made in Louisiana.

The latter has been transferred to a dispenser and I no longer remember the brand name but I did purchase it at a specialty market that used to carry a lot of Cajun products.

For many years I would get an annual gift of a gallon can (looked like a paint can) of sorghum molasses from my family's farm but they gave up on growing and processing sorghum some years ago, so I no longer have that source. (More money in fancy baby vegetables.)

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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Love molasses! When I was a kid was very skinny and I'm very fair. The Dr. decreed I was anemic, no blood test, so I was pumped full of iron. POne of the things was a couple of spoonfuls of molasses in my milk. Yummy stuff.

I love gingerbread, molasses and oatmeal cookies, barbecue sauce, baked beans, and sometimes I will drizzle it over a waffle.

I have always used Brer Rabbit because that's what Mom used.

Don't care much for Shoofly Pie.

Bradley Ogden's barbecue sauce in his book "Breakfast, Lunch, and Dinner" is outstanding.

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Back in the '70s someone gave me a recipe for a pie made with saltine crackers, molasses and apple cider vinegar and some spices and probably some other ingredients but that is all I recall.

I lost the card years ago and this topic reminded me of the pie.

I have searched online with no success so if anyone has any knowledge of this, please post it here.

I recall that it tasted vaguely like an apple pie and was quite good and not as sweet as I had expected.

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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Back in the '70s someone gave me a recipe for a pie made with saltine crackers, molasses and apple cider vinegar and some spices and probably some other ingredients but that is all I recall.

I lost the card years ago and this topic reminded me of the pie. 

I have searched online with no success so if anyone has any knowledge of this, please post it here.

I recall that it tasted vaguely like an apple pie and was quite good and not as sweet as I had expected.

Search under Ritz crackers. I recall a mock apple pie made with those, rather than with saltines.

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How about "Mock Mince Pie"

Mock Mince Pie.

Three soda crackers rolled fine, one cup of cold water, one cup of molasses, one-half cup of brown sugar, one-half cup of sour cider or vinegar, one-half cup of melted butter, one half-cup of raisins, one half-cup of currants, one egg beaten light, one teaspoonful of cinnamon, one-quarter teaspoonful each of cloves, allspice and nutmeg, five apples chopped fine.

I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

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Thanks, Kerry and Jaymes.

The recipe I had specified saltines (actually it was "soda" crackers) and there were no apples involved.

One point that I remember involved breaking the crackers into quarters - this was before the advent of single crackers in sleeves - and then breaking half of the crackers into smaller pieces.

The ones left "whole" were dipped in water to soften then used to line the pie tin.

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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I found a mention of the original recipe, as well as a recipe for the Ritz version of Mock Apple Pie.

This site notes that it originated in California in 1852.

Who knew?

It was published in an 1894 cookbook in Los Angeles.

Still haven't got the actual recipe but I may have that cookbook in my antique collection.

I do have the Helen Evans Brown cookbook.

Edited by andiesenji (log)

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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I came up with a use for molasses so perfect I almost hesistated to share it, but decided I want others to have a secret up their sleeve: I put a bit of it in my vinagrettes.

Dijon, cider or white wine vinegar, cracked pepper, olive oil, some finely minced shallot, pinch of salt and a dollop of molasses. It's perfect.

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I came up with a use for molasses so perfect I almost hesistated to share it, but decided I want others to have a secret up their sleeve: I put a bit of it in my vinagrettes.

Dijon, cider or white wine vinegar, cracked pepper, olive oil, some finely minced shallot, pinch of salt and a dollop of molasses. It's perfect.

Thank you, Chappie. It does sound good and I'm gonna try it right away. Nice of you to share.

But don't worry, I'll keep your secret. I promise not to tell anyone else.

I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

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I love molasses, and I love all these ideas.  Now all we need here is some favorite recipes!

I found a handful of easy and seemingly delicious recipes from an old cookbook I picked up, "Meta Given's Modern Encyclopedia of Cooking". I haven't yet tried them, but once I do, I'll check back in and comment:

Molasses Nog:

3 1/2 cups chilled milk

1/2 cup coffee cream

2 or 3 tbsp molasses

dash of nutmeg or ginger

dash of salt

-Combine first 4 ingredients, stir well. Pour into glasses and sprinkle w/ preferred spice. 4 servings.

Molasses Shake:

-Measure into shaker: 2 tbsp light molasses, 2 tbsp lemon juice, 1 tsp sugar, 1/4 tsp grated lemon peel and 1 cup milk. Add a large scoop of vanilla ice cream and beat well. 1-2 servings.

Soft Molasses Rolled Cookies:

5 1/4 to 5 1/2 cups AP Flour

1 1/2 tsp cream of tartar

1 1/2 tsp ginger

1 1/2 tsp cinnamon

1/2 tsp cloves

3/4 tsp salt

1 cup leaf lard

1 cup sugar

1 cup molasses

2 tsp vanilla

1 egg, beaten

4 tsp soda

3/4 hot water

-Grease baking sheet lightly, then dust w/ flour. 10 min. before bake, set oven to 400 degrees.

-Sift flour, measure, resift 3 times w/ next 5 ingredients. Heat lard until barely melted, cool slightly, then pour over sugar in a 4-qt mixing bowl. Beat until blended, then beat in molasses, then vanilla & egg, beating very hard. Dissolve soda into the hot water and stir into molasses mixture. Now stir dry ingredients into molasses mix in 3-4 portions, stirring after each. Cover dough and chill 20 min. +. Once chilled, roll out 1/4 inch thick and cut w/ rounds. Place on prepared sheet pan and bake 10 min. Cool.

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  • 2 weeks later...

I'm not a fan of molasses except for in gingerbread, although I did grow up with the soft-butter-mixed-with-sorghum on biscuits.

Today, however, I ran aross this recipe for Lemon-Molasses Dressing in one of my many recipe boxes and thought some of you molasses lovers might like to try it.

Lemon-Molasses Dressing or Marinade

1/2 C. lemon juice

1/4 C. molasses

2 T. olive oil

2 T. minced shallot

1 t. grated lemon rind

1 t. dijon mustard

1/4 t. salt

1/4 t. freshly ground pepper

Whisk together all ingredients. Serve over salad greens or use as a marinade for girlled cicken, pork, seafood or vegetables. Yield: 1 cup.

How about marinating shrimp and cooking on the grill, then serving over a green salad with the same dressing (just don't use the marinade!). Some cornbread croutons might be nice, too.

Ruth Dondanville aka "ruthcooks"

“Are you making a statement, or are you making dinner?” Mario Batali

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My favorite way to eat molasses is with a spoon. Preferably a very large spoon.

But recently, because my husband brought home a cheap bottle of "curry powder" for rice, a weirdly unsatisfying blend I couldn't seem to make work, I added some molasses which made all the difference.

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I grew up in Benton County, TN, at that time one of the state's largest producers of sorghum molasses. The production of the first "new sorghum" of the year was always a major occasion requiring the canonical "new sorghum" dinner: Thick-sliced country bacon, canned tomatos from the garden, biscuits, butter and sorghum.

To eat the sorghum, one put a pat of butter on the plate, poured a dollop of sorghum over it, creamed the two together with the flat of a table knife blade, and spread it on the biscuits.

Sometimes it would be cracklin' cornbread instead of biscuits.

Andisenji, a source for old-fashioned sorghum molasses: The Andy Mast Family, 480 Hidden Valley Road, Pleasantville, TN, 37147. They're Amish, so I doubt they have internet capability for ordering, but I'd bet you can order by mail.

Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

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Andisenji, a source for old-fashioned sorghum molasses: The Andy Mast Family, 480 Hidden Valley Road, Pleasantville, TN, 37147. They're Amish, so I doubt they have internet capability for ordering, but I'd bet you can order by mail.

Thank you for posting that. My father, nearly 90, loves sorghum. I'll write the Mast family immediately and see about ordering some.

I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

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When I was a kid we used to go to my grandmother's home town in the PA mountains (Lykens). There you could by what my father called "cow molasses"

You had to bring your own jar and the shopkeeper would pump the molasses out of a barrel with a hand cranked pump. That stuff was great on a nice fresh slice of white bread.

Chris

Cookbooks are full of stirring passages

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