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Here is my mise en place for tonight's stew, Khemee. This is one of my absolute favorites. The ingredient that makes this stew so special is the dried lime. It adds a tartness that is different from that of a fresh lime; it is almost a sweet sort of tart. The other wonderful ingredient is the split peas. These cook until they are tender and even beyond, until they begin to fall apart.

I have used a lot of potato in tonight's dish. Normallly one would use only one, or even none, instead opting for the third special touch in this dish: a topping of fried matchstick potatoes. I will probably do those anyway, but I am partial to potatoes and I enjoy them in this dish, so in they went.

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Here is a glimpse of the stew as it all comes together over the heat:

gallery_41870_2503_45640.jpg

Later I'll show you what it looks like when it's done.

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Here is my mise en place for tonight's stew, Khemee.  This is one of my absolute favorites.  The ingredient that makes this stew so special is the dried lime.  It adds a tartness that is different from that of a fresh lime; it is almost a sweet sort of tart.  The other wonderful ingredient is the split peas.  These cook until they are tender and even beyond, until they begin to fall apart.

I have used a lot of potato in tonight's dish.  Normallly one would use only one, or even none, instead opting for the third special touch in this dish:  a topping of fried matchstick potatoes.  I will probably do those anyway, but I am partial to potatoes and I enjoy them in this dish, so in they went.

gallery_41870_2503_24724.jpg

gallery_41870_2503_78398.jpg

gallery_41870_2503_90578.jpg

Here is a glimpse of the stew as it all comes together over the heat:

gallery_41870_2503_45640.jpg

Later I'll show you what it looks like when it's done.

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I've been sitting on a bag of dried lime peel I bought from a Persian food store wondering what to do with it. Those are whole limes I see. Are you soaking them first instead of letting the stew reconstitute them? Is that lamb?

Definitely interested in recipe. Can't find "Khemee" when searched.

"I took the habit of asking Pierre to bring me whatever looks good today and he would bring out the most wonderful things," - bleudauvergne

foodblogs: Dining Downeast I - Dining Downeast II

Portland Food Map.com

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Johnnyd, Hetta, I would love to see your version of this dish!

As for the recipe, the stew is also written as Khoresht Ghaimeh, it's all a translation from Persian, I guess I spell it the way I hear it. You can find the method and proportions here

The only difference is that I don't soak the chickpeas, I find mine cook really well without soaking, but I do soak the dried limes as you noticed, Johnnyd. Also I use only turmeric, not paprika.

Johnnyd, I usually use veal, and that is what I did today, although you can also use lamb or beef.

Also we add fried matchstick potatoes on top of the stew at the table (or even matchstick potato chips or crushed chips in a pinch). The idea is to enjoy the contrast between the soft stew and the crunchy topping. And of course we serve it with Persian style basmati.

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Soups and stews are my very favorite. And thanks to you, I'm now aware of an entire category that, prior to your thread, I never really knew existed.

Thanks so much, and I'm definitely going to stay tuned.

I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

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Hi Shaya. Part of my excitement is that I am looking forward to a period of relatively steady supply of dried limes from a friend who who travels to the UAE regularly. They are unknown and very hard to come by in South Africa. I am looking forward to experimenting with all sorts of dishes and I think yours will be the first one. I also once read about a 'lemonade' that is made with these limes which I am looking forward to try. Thanks for the recipe.

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That looks so tasty! I have never made this Persian stew and would love to try it. BTW, I usually use the black Pesian limes, is there a difference in taste? The black limes I use in Ghormeh Sabzi (herb stew) which is my favorite Persian stew but your Khemee might change that.

I tried making this stew:

gallery_63527_6511_68274.jpg

It looks like a plain Irish stew except that those are apples in there and not potatoes, and it is flavoured with cinnamon and safron. The flavour is sweet and sour so popular in many Middle Eastern dishes. It was a bit stange and I would make it with a sweeter apple next time and not granny smith.

Cheers, Sarah

http://sarahmelamed.com/

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Melamed that stew looks very intriguing, does it have a name? I'm not too sure how I feel about the combination of fruit and meat in stews...

A comment about the use of the dried limes...I always poke a few holes in them either with a fork or the tip of a sharp knife (they are a bit hard to stab when dry so watch your fingers in the process...) This will help them to release their flavor into the stew. After the limes have softened in the pot I usually smash them down so they give up even move flavor.

I never saw anyone do this growing up but my sweetie loves to eat them once they're cooked :shock: .

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Johnnyd, Hetta, I would love to see your version of this dish!

As for the recipe, the stew is also written as Khoresht Ghaimeh, it's all a translation from Persian, I guess I spell it the way I hear it.  You can find the method and proportions here

The only difference is that I don't soak the chickpeas, I find mine cook really well without soaking, but I do soak the dried limes as you noticed, Johnnyd.  Also I use only turmeric, not paprika.

Johnnyd, I usually use veal, and that is what I did today, although you can also use lamb or beef.

Also we add fried matchstick potatoes on top of the stew at the table (or even matchstick potato chips or crushed chips in a pinch). The idea is to enjoy the contrast between the soft stew and the crunchy topping.    And of course we serve it with Persian style basmati.

That website is an excellent resource!

Your veal substitution sounds good so I'm going that route. I've been looking for a good Fesenjaan recipe too since I have a bottle of pomegranate syrup form the same Persian store I bought the limes from. These folks made delicious Persian dishes that I enjoyed very much until they had to close. Our little New England city couldn't support it I'm afraid. (Read my restaurant review here: Shanaz Persian Grill)

"I took the habit of asking Pierre to bring me whatever looks good today and he would bring out the most wonderful things," - bleudauvergne

foodblogs: Dining Downeast I - Dining Downeast II

Portland Food Map.com

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Hmm Shaya is this everyday food? I rather think it is not

My friends soon to be partners both from Teheran and do not think as I stated earlier.

Please clarify?

I'm not sure I understand your question, pizzaola.

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  • 3 weeks later...

Ghormeh Sabzi at my Aunt's in LA last week. It has the traditional pieces of meat (beef in this case) but for a change my uncle suggested she also add meatballs - very untraditional - but made for a great stew. you can see the kidney beans and dried limes floating on top.

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