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I have been reading the posts here for about a year now, and i have fully enjoyed everyones' input, and wealth of knowledge. To everyone in a word, thanks.

I have a question which i have no idea about, how to make kosher chocolates.

A friend of mine who works for a caterer says if i could make some it could be a great market to cater to, so to speak.

Any info would be greatly appreciated

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great tip , i'll avoid bacon, lol

and I looked at the website, but they only sell the kosher chocolates, no tips, much thanks though

Well actually on their website they actually say all their ingredients are strictly kosher... and they have a rabbi that oversees the operation...

Which is what is required to have a kosher product...

Top Chef Hung runs a kosher restaurant and they are strict... You even need a Rabbi to TURN YOUR STOVE ON!!! can you belive it!!! how kosher is that?!?!?!?!? does me turning the knob make it any less kosher then you turning the knob??!?!?!

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I may be in the gutter, but I am still staring at the stars.

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Making kosher chocolate (confections) isn't necessarily difficult. You must have a set of pots, tools, etc. which are ONLY used with milk products (e.g. NOT meat). The difficult part is that you must have your kitchen declared kosher by an appropriate rabbi or work in an existing kosher kitchen.

I've made chocolates and had them refused by folks who keep kosher because there were unsure if all my tools, etc. were only used for this one purpose.

I would suggest you find a local synagogue and talk to the rabbi there.

Steve Lebowitz

Doer of All Things

Steven Howard Confections

Slicing a warm slab of bacon is a lot like giving a ferret a shave. No matter how careful you are, somebody's going to get hurt - Alton Brown, "Good Eats"

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Some of the chocolatiers here on eG make use of church kitchens to produce their chocolates. I wonder if renting time in a synagogue kitchen would make it easier to have your chocolates certified kosher.

I think Lebowit's advice to talk to the rabbi would be a great way to start. I know I'd have a whole lot to learn before I would be comfortable knowing that something I'd produced would meet kosher certification.

After Fat Guy's problem with finding Kosher Marischino for his preschool event - I went on a little online search for Kosher liqueurs - they exist - but not every liqueur seems to be represented.

What chocolate has anyone found that is kosher?

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A Rabbi isn't required to supervise kosher production, a mashgiach is. And a mashgiach may or may not be a rabbi.

Second, it depends on where you are and who you want your market to be. Different supervising boards will have different rules about where you can produce them and what you can use. You could ask a local rabbi, or you could ask the local hashgacha (supervising board).

Where are you located?

The basics are:

  • Everything you use must be kosher -- have a kosher hechsher or marking on it
  • The facility you work in must be supervised by a mashgiach -- or a mashgiach must be willing to work with you in a non-kosher facility
  • Working in a non-kosher facility, you will need separate equipment, and depending on what goes on there, the mashgiach may have to 'kasher' things like the stove or worktops (using a blow-torch or boiling water)
  • If you work in a non-kosher facility, you will most likely not be able to do any production without the mashgiach being on hand
  • Again, depending on who is supervising, you might have to make a choice between dairy or non-dairy chocolate -- if you choose dairy, all items, even those containing no dairy may be considered dairy - and if you go parve, then you are limited to all non-dairy
  • Not all items deemed kosher by one organization is considered kosher by all of them

I'm sure I'll think of more things. But if you let us know where you are, I can put you in touch with the right organization.

Edited by Pam R (log)
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And don't forget, the "mashgiach" = surpervisor costs and he supervises either daily or weekly or periodically, depending on him. He will check that everything you use down to the orange oil or liqueur, is kosher. If all your chocoalte etc is kosher then a synagogue kitchen would be legal according to kosher law-but the dairy side=it would be dairy kosher-no meat.

Good luck!

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And some synagogues will have an in-house mashgiach to work with - others will still require a mashgiach from the local authority, usually paid by the hour on top of your monthly fee. This kosher business can be quite complicated.

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Again, the process will vary depending on where you are and who supervises you. We were under va'ad supervision for over 20 years, but had to have other supervision if we worked in different synagogues.

Lior, do you find it hard to find the ingredients you need with a hechsher? Is it easier or harder because you're in Israel?

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      ( RG2108 )
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