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kreed

Pickling/fermenting

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I didn't see a topic here for this so I figured I would start one. I know we have a canning/preserves but it would be nice to have a thread for pickling/fermenting things specifically.

I actually do have a question that I need help with. In Maryland alot of delis and sandwich shops sell pickled jumbo onions. These are pickled onions that are the size of a regular cooking onion. The brine is slightly sweet and sour and you eat the onion by peeling off each layer and enjoying the crunch. In the stores they are kept in very large plastic or glass jars same as some bars keep the pickled eggs or pigs feet in. I have not for the life of me been able to recreate these onions and would love some help or insight.

Anyone from Maryland aware of what I am talking about? Some research showed these may be a kosher item as they are sold in alot of Jewish delis in Baltimore.

Any help is appreciated.


Edited by kreed (log)

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I've pickled kosher green tomatoes and cucumbers; kimchi, eggs, and small boiling onions. (Got some of those going now.) Other things, too. I haven't ever done any regular cooking onions, although I'd imagine that the technique is similar to the small boiling onions.

I recommend the book, if you can find a copy, "Better Than Store Bought", by Colcie and Witty, published back in the early 80s. It has some very good pickling and preserving recipes, and I've seldom gone wrong using them.


Buen provecho, Panosmex

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Its funny this comes up right now. I was thinking of getting a Harsch Gairtopf Fermenting Crock Pot to do this.

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Its funny this comes up right now.  I was thinking of getting a Harsch Gairtopf Fermenting Crock Pot to do this.

To do what? Make a pickled onion?

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Its funny this comes up right now.  I was thinking of getting a Harsch Gairtopf Fermenting Crock Pot to do this.

To do what? Make a pickled onion?

Make Pickles in general..sauerkraut, cucumber pickles, yes even onion.

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Shouldn't there be a way to find a suitable crock with all those "features" for, oh, I don't know ... $100 less?

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Shouldn't there be a way to find a suitable crock with all those "features" for, oh, I don't know ... $100 less?

My father used a straight sided crock with an upturned plate weighted by a 'crock stone', with a cloth cover over it. It works but there's a chance of contamination. The ones I pointed out are pretty much fool proof.

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I have the 15l Harsch and it is outstanding!

The use of any other type of crock without a water seal leads to contamination, scum on the surface and eventual loss of product.

There are yeasts all around and what you want for your fermentation crock is the correct type of yeast such as that supplied by whey.

Without the water seal other yeasts eventually make thier way into your crock.-Dick

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I won a Japanese water-sealed pickling crock years ago. I use it, it's very nice, but I don't think I'd walk past 10 other crocks just to get to that one.

You may well find reasonably priced crocks in Japanese or other east Asian stores.

I use the "boiled rock", "boiled plate", method for preparing pickles.

If you create the right environment, the flora you want will thrive. It's also a good idea to have fermenting pickles in a place where temperature doesn't fluctuate too much or get too hot, and away from lots of passing people.

There are some excellent sites on traditional fermented pickles from the extension services of various midwestern universities, if you care to google.

Crunchy pickles usually have calcium added at some point in the pickling process.

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I won a Japanese water-sealed pickling crock years ago. I use it, it's very nice, but I don't think I'd walk past 10 other crocks just to get to that one.

You may well find reasonably priced crocks in Japanese or other east Asian stores.

I use the "boiled rock", "boiled plate", method for preparing pickles.

If you create the right environment, the flora you want will thrive. It's also a good idea to have fermenting pickles in a place where temperature doesn't fluctuate too much or get too hot, and away from lots of passing people.

There are some excellent sites on traditional fermented pickles from the extension services of various midwestern universities, if you care to google.

Crunchy pickles usually have calcium added at some point in the pickling process.

I use both pickling lime and pickling salt - both are available at my local Wal-Mart so I assume that most of their stores will carry them (right next to the canning jars).

pickling lime is simply food grade calcium hydroxide.

I have one of the HG fermenting crocks - I think it is only 5-liter but it is a handy size for me. I made a nice batch of pickled ginger the last time I used it and it turned out better than when I made it in a glass jar.


Edited by andiesenji (log)

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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OK then, I take back my grumblings. So how do I win one?

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