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Fascinating Chocolate Demo


schneich
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back from europain, with some impressions:

check out the chocolate decoration demo, it was a chinese booth with a chinese chef who had some incredible tricks :-) after watching him for quite some time i am sure that his chocolate has some oil in it to make it smoother...

cheers

t.

toertchen toertchen

patissier chocolatier cafe

cologne, germany

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Just lovely! How did he keep those points and manage totake off the umwanted parts-at the end?! And Iassume the reason for putting the "plastic foil" on the closing of the bars is for shininess? Have you tried this? I guess you could do the same for all moulds. I love this stuff!! Thank you so much!

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awesome video. Thanks for taking the time to make it and post it. The Chinese chef in that last sequence certainly seemed to be making the chocolate do whatever he wants - that flower at the end was just incredible

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Lior - you can also put transfer sheets on the bottom of your chocolates using that technique. Makes them pricier to sell but is pretty much standard at competition level from what I hear

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Oh now why didn't I know that?! Thanks! Do people turn them over and look? I must try this!

People do notice - maybe moreso on the larger moulded items. But it does add to the cost of your piece.

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Yes I see it adds and is also time consuming a bit I suppose. But it seems like a must try! Any tips? I imagine it is done like the bars on the video!

Yep, just like the video. Back your mould off as normal - it needs to be scraped very clean. When the chocolate has set, put a line of chocolate along one of the edges of the mould and use it to stick the transfer sheet down on one end. Then grip the transfer sheet with your fingers and just scrape across the mould. Try and do it in one go - you don't want to go back and forth across the transfer sheet because you will disrupt the pattern.

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hi,

i think it really was a great show, especially patisserie wise. there was not much serious chocolate stuff going on. valrohna had a nice new bonbon mold which can be parsonalized. wolfberger had some really cool new liquers (we were drunk when we left the booth) which was chocolate, violet and rose. sosa had a whole lot of really great new products, like chunks of dried fruitpowders, a stabilizer called gelcrem which gives anything you want the texture of creme pat and a product called "pro gianduja" which lets you create ganachelike textures with 0% water activity (great for enclosing crunchy elements without having them to get soggy)

you can find the video also under my youtube profilename:

schneichs youtube profile

cheers

t.

toertchen toertchen

patissier chocolatier cafe

cologne, germany

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valrohna had a nice new bonbon mold which can be parsonalized.

... a product called "pro gianduja" which lets you create ganachelike textures with 0% water activity (great for enclosing crunchy elements without having them to get soggy)

Great stuff!

How does the bonbon mold work? Where can I learn more about the "pro gianduja" (in English)?

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Just saw the video and just for any non-mandarin speaking friends here who might be interested, a fellow chinese guy asked the chef what temperature his marble slab was at, and the chef said he keeps it at 22 to 25 degrees celsius.

Furthermore, he added that in colder months, he warms it up and in warmer months, he uses the air-conditioning to cool things down. His chocolate goes on at around 32 to 33 degrees celsius.

Hope that info was helpful to anyone curious about that.

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we tried it out yesterday and iam certain that this guy uses 5 - 10 % oil in the chocolate. when we tried without, the chocolate got way too fragile and crumbly.

cheers

t.

Yeah, had to be too good to be true.

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  • 2 months later...
Wow. I'm late to the party viewing the video, but... wow. That guy was amazing. He made it all look so effortless!

Thanks so much for sharing this. How fun that must have been!

Diane

AwholeLottaChocolate

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