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demiglace

Cornish Pasty

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I want to make a traditional Cornish Pasty for someone in a nursing home. Do I use ground beef or steak or ? I want to surprise him so I can't ask him. Any help would be appreciated.

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I want to make a traditional Cornish Pasty for someone in a nursing home. Do I use ground beef or steak or ? I want to surprise him so I can't ask him. Any help would be appreciated.

Nice thought!

The big controversy would likely surround the inclusion or (purist) exclusion of carrot!

But the meat does need to be in chunks...

ADDED: And I'd also say crimped on top, not at the side.


Edited by dougal (log)

"If you wish to make an apple pie from scratch ... you must first invent the universe." - Carl Sagan

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as long as the meat is nice and tender... cubes would be better I think..and no carrot!

but yes seal down the top... not on the side for I agree on that! it looks so nice when it is presented if you have a nicely pinched down the middle crust


why am I always at the bottom and why is everything so high? 

why must there be so little me and so much sky?

Piglet 

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Yes, meat in smallish chunks, potatoes, onions and, not carrot but diced rutabaga -- or swedes as they call them across the pond. When I leave them out, I miss their flavor. That's an "authentic" recipe.

That said, a Cornish lady can improvise with what's at hand. I remember reading a Cornish saying that goes something like: Satan won't venture into Cornwall for fear of being baked into a Pasty."


Margaret McArthur

"Take it easy, but take it."

Studs Terkel

1912-2008

A sensational tennis blog from freakyfrites

margaretmcarthur.com

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It's my belief that a TRUE cornish pasty didn't have any meat in it. Let's hear from some members in Cornwall.

Btw, of course, I always put minced beef in mine!

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Well I live in the West Country but was not born & raised here so no pretence to having an authentic Cornish recipe but this cornish pastie looks good from a bakery in Cornwall.

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I have Lived in Cornwall for 8 years and can say that I have never had a pasty with the crimping down the middle. The link Lapin dor has left :biggrin: is to chough bakery in Padstow. They are the best I have eaten so try that recipe. Maybe cut down on the pepper though for someone in a nursing home, because chough pasties are very peppery. Good Luck

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Crimp down the side NOT the top, for traditional pasty.I,m 100yds from The Chough as i type :biggrin:

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Wow thanks for the imput. I wanted traditional because the gentleman is from Cornwall. So NO carrots :biggrin: got it! I will have to think the meat through a little more...I want to do skirt but I wonder if he could manage it..hmmm. I am now considering doing a smaller version..a full sized one might be too big. Crimping..I think I'll wait and see how I do...then claim I did it that way on purpose! Works for me :smile: Thank you all.

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gallery_17322_5511_52126.jpg

So I did a trial run...turned out ok I think..people liked them. I crimped on the top on some and on the side on others..my crimping needs work :biggrin: I asked the butcher where I could find skirt steak and was told Texas. Hmm a bit too far away so I opted for chuck. Would like a beefier taste though..any thoughts.

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If I could not get good skirt steak I would be tempted to try well aged rump steak. Not sure what the equivalent cut would be called in the US. Pasties often do not have a lot of meat in so this is not such an expensive option.

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Do not use ground beef or hamburger. Cubed steak is the way to go. I've had pasties in Michigan's Upper Peninsula more times than I can remember and one pasty purchased in Dolgellau, Wales for my climb up Cadair Idris mountain, but none in Cornwall.


Davydd

It is just an Anglicized Welsh spelling for David to celebrate my English/Welsh ancestry. The Welsh have no "v" in their alphabet or it would be spelled Dafydd.

I must warn you. My passion is the Breaded Pork Tenderloin Sandwich

Now blogging: Pork Tenderloin Sandwich Blog

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ok..hmm more options. I'm in Canada and we do have rump roast. I'll go check out the meat dept. again..see what's available. I've found the pasties I've had here are very dry. My memories of pasties in England go back to the 70's..so how accurate is my memory?..I loved the taste of beef in England. Well I have time for one more trial run. Thanks guys. Oh and the pic of the side crimped ones was too shiny so I didn't post it..but I liked the look very much!


Edited by demiglace (log)

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If you want to go for the real authenticity, don't forget to divide off a bit of the pasty to fill one of the ends with jam - for pudding !

I would concur with the person who said stewing steak, potato, swede and maybe turnip. Mind you, my Mum puts all sorts of garbage in hers, from peas to baked beans.


Edited by Fibilou (log)

www.diariesofadomesticatedgoddess.blogspot.com

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I asked the butcher where I could find skirt steak and was told Texas.

Too funny.

I agree with the other posters. No carrot, but swede (rutabaga) is absolutely imperative to the 'traditional' flavour. Traditionally, chunks or chips of beef are used but I have to be honest, I prefer ground beef. I think the flavours blend better with ground beef, but that's just a personal preference.

I wasn't born in Cornwall, but I grew up there. One of the things I really miss is a good pastie and always on the 'must eat' list when I go home for vacay. There seems to be all kinds of pastie flavours now, curry pastie, leek & onion, etc, but the traditional, in my opinion, is still the best.

I have followed this recipe with quite good results in the past. Nothing beats a pastie from Padstow though and fighting off the seagulls in the harbor while you eat it. :biggrin:

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I was going to mention the dessert pocket -- I was thinking apples and cinnamon.


I like to bake nice things. And then I eat them. Then I can bake some more.

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I want to make a traditional Cornish Pasty for someone in a nursing home. Do I use ground beef or steak or ? I want to surprise him so I can't ask him. Any help would be appreciated.

Before y'all do anything you need to read the definitive Cornish Pastie 'denoument' by his Grimesness of the New York Times, which is an ad. supported rag given out at subway stations in New York City:

http://query.nytimes.com/gst/fullpage.html...aked%20Products

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I asked the butcher where I could find skirt steak and was told Texas.

How about ethnic markets, such as Asian or Hispanic markets? Around here skirt steak is always available in Hispanic markets to make fajitas. If no skirt steak, how about flank steak?

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...

Before y'all do anything you need to read the definitive Cornish Pastie 'denoument' by his Grimesness of the New York Times, ...

http://query.nytimes.com/gst/fullpage.html...aked%20Products

Oh well...

BTW, dunno if it was a typo or sloppy reporting, but "Gristers" :blink: ??

Perhaps "Ginsters" http://www.ginsters.co.uk (purveyors of pies and "pasties" to motorway service stations across the country... )

To adopt an heretically fundamentalist approach, I tend towards the belief that the pasty filling had its origins in left-over stew, and that the pastry's original function was as, (more or less edible), packaging.

Applying this approach legitimises taking all the care you wish to over the cooking of each individual component, before assembling them and giving a final bake to the specific requirements of the pastry.

It may not have the ascetic purity of cooking everything together in a single hit, but you just know that if Keller was going to make a pasty, he'd do it as an assembly. And even in Kernow it would be applauded.


"If you wish to make an apple pie from scratch ... you must first invent the universe." - Carl Sagan

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Although if he was referring to Grinsters, maybe "Grimness of New York" would have been more appropriate :laugh:

Dougal, I think a contest for the most Laundy-fied Cornish Pasty would be amusing.


Edited by Fibilou (log)

www.diariesofadomesticatedgoddess.blogspot.com

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Pasties from Suzy's Pastie Shoppe on Michigan's Upper Peninsula just west of the Mackinac Bridge.

The scene is on the sand beach on Lake Michigan.

gallery_44979_5516_35521.jpg

There were lots of seagulls there but somehow did not make it in this photo. :biggrin:


Edited by Davydd (log)

Davydd

It is just an Anglicized Welsh spelling for David to celebrate my English/Welsh ancestry. The Welsh have no "v" in their alphabet or it would be spelled Dafydd.

I must warn you. My passion is the Breaded Pork Tenderloin Sandwich

Now blogging: Pork Tenderloin Sandwich Blog

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Pasties from Suzy's Pastie Shoppe on Michigan's Upper Peninsula just west of the Mackinac Bridge.

The scene is on the sand beach on Lake Michigan.

gallery_44979_5516_35521.jpg

There were lots of seagulls there but somehow did not make it in this photo.  :biggrin:

Being married to a Cornish lass, and for living there, for 12 years-ish, I feel compelled to agree Davydd, as regards shaping.

The crust around the side was ther to assist the Cornish miners in staying alive after eating, the problem with mining ore is heavy metals and if you eat deep below ground all manner of politeness is left above ground.

The pastry crimp was never eaten and was left below ground and was used as a handle to eat the potato/swede/carrot/onion and beef filling.

Now here`s a twist......

......it also contained the dessert course !!

One end was savoury and the other contained the dessert course, usually jam(jelly) and cream, or in season apple and cream.

Hope this is of some use.


"It's true I crept the boards in my youth, but I never had it in my blood, and that's what so essential isn't it? The theatrical zeal in the veins. Alas, I have little more than vintage wine and memories." - Montague Withnail.

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I've really appreciated everyone's imput :smile: ..now to decide how to proceed..hmm.


Edited by demiglace (log)

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