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Mousse Troubleshooting


Marky Marc
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So I made a mousse. I beat the yolks and whites seperately in a double boiler to 145 degrees. The yolks turned out fine. The whies on the other hand are very grainy.

Are they over or undercooked?

Explaination?

Fanx,

Marc

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Could they be overcooked? The eggs might be cooking against a part of the bain marie or bowl which then gets mixed into the meringue. What shape is the vessel holding the whites? If it's a standard saucepan shape, there's a good chance of bits of egg white cooking along the outer perimeter of the base.

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It could also be that the whites are getting over whipped without cooking out proplerly.

Do you need to cook out the whites over a bain marie or could you make your mousse with an Italian meringue? therefore slightly/sufficently cooking your whites, but using a safer method.

What type of mousse are you making?

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you don't necessarily need to cook your whites, you can just beat them separately and then fold them into the yolk mixture. Here's the best method to beat whites.

Room temperature whites

beat on low speed until frothy, then SLOWLY add sugar. (if your recipe doesn't call for sugar with the whites, then use a little of the sugar from the other portion, about 1 tsp per cup of whites)

beat on medium speed...a slow beating will give you the most stable volume and allow you to control how far to whip them. I usually stop before I think they're ready. just sitting in the bowl they will stiffin up a little bit.

If you insist on heating your whites (as in safe meringue), just heat them in your bain marie, then when they reach 145 transfer them to your mixer and beat them there.

Stephanie Crocker

Sugar Bakery + Cafe

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Thanks for all the responses!

I cooked the whites and sugar in a bowl over a pot of simmering water while whisking it by hand. Had I known it wasn't necessary to cook them in order to achieve the necessary consistency, I never would have done it.

Whipping the yolks, whites, and cream seperately was one hell of a workout. I was dripping with sweat afterwards. If it's possible to over whip it by hand then I'm sure that has something to do with it. I felt like a freaking hummingbird.

This was for a chocolate mousse BTW.

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Yeah, you don't have to whip the whites over the bain marie to soft peaks, you can do that in a mixer. You probably didn't over whip, you probably just had some whites cook because your hand couldn't go as fast as a mixer...but maybe with practice we'll put you head to head with a kitchenaide!

Stephanie Crocker

Sugar Bakery + Cafe

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Yeah, you don't have to whip the whites over the bain marie to soft peaks, you can do that in a mixer. You probably didn't over whip, you probably just had some whites cook because your hand couldn't go as fast as a mixer...but maybe with practice we'll put you head to head with a kitchenaide!

bring it on :raz:

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Just curious, why not make a pâte à bombe with egg yolks and whites together?

Well......... I have no idea what that is for one. Two, it was my first time making a mousse so I followed the recipe I had.

So what is a pâte à bombe?

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Just curious, why not make a pâte à bombe with egg yolks and whites together?

Well......... I have no idea what that is for one. Two, it was my first time making a mousse so I followed the recipe I had.

So what is a pâte à bombe?

Drizzling soft ball sugar syrup into whole eggs whilst whipping said eggs.

May

Totally More-ish: The New and Improved Foodblog

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