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scotsaute

Cocoa, Rockledge, Melbourne shopping recs

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Will be in the Rockledge area for a couple of weeks. I've searched the Florida threads and have a couple of recommendations for eating out (however if you have any additional recs they would be most appreciated). However, as we will have our own kitchen, I am looking for recommendations for good quality Deli, butcher, fishmongers, etc in the area.

Thanks in advance

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Will be in the Rockledge area for a couple of weeks.  I've searched the Florida threads and have a couple of recommendations for eating out (however if you have any additional recs they would be most appreciated).  However, as we will have our own kitchen, I am looking for recommendations for good quality Deli, butcher, fishmongers, etc in the area.

Thanks in advance

While I remember, in reply to my own post! Any good kitchen supply shops (knives, pots etc)?

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