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I'm not sure if this has been on eGullet before, feel free to remove it, if so.

What the World Eats

It's interesting to see the range of pre-packaged and processed foods available (and the amount of soft/alcoholic drink some consume!!). I guess the families on show would not be considered "typical" when compared to many eGulleteers :biggrin: .

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Though I enjoyed seeing the differences of food each 'typical' family would consume, I feel so sad to see the sparse spread of the family featured in Chad. :sad:

Doddie aka Domestic Goddess

"Nobody loves pork more than a Filipino"

eGFoodblog: Adobo and Fried Chicken in Korea

The dark side... my own blog: A Box of Jalapenos

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There were some lonely looking vegetables on some of those Western spreads.

...wine can of their wits the wise beguile, make the sage frolic, and the serious smile. --Alexander Pope

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Wow, that was fascinating. Coke and bananas appear almost universally!

Though I enjoyed seeing the differences of food each 'typical' family would consume, I feel so sad to see the sparse spread of the family featured in Chad. sad.gif

It was their "Favourite recipe: soup with fresh sheep meat." that choked me up. I wonder how often they get that for dinner? It really made me appreciate how lucky I am.

I'd have a hard time guessing what I ate each week, though - I shop on the day I want to cook, and eat out more than I cook. The only things lying around my house are condiments, bags of dried pasta and rice, bottled water and coffee.

It was also interesting to see the relative cost of things - In the UK, about $250, In China and Poland, around $150, almost $200 in Mexico, $350 in North Carolina...

...although a lot could be chalked up to the age and number of family members. I'd like to see their food expenditures as a percentage of all household spending.

Which family looks most like yours?

Mine looks like the family in Kuwait, mostly due to the bag of rice, flats of bottled water, and a small amount of meat.

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Some things I noticed:

the family from n. carolina and great britain scared me - whats with all of the processed foods? They also eat a lot of meat!!!

They egyptian family had a lot of delicious looking vegetables and fruits (and a HUGE family).

I want the polish family to invite me over for their family recipe.

The family from germany is very neat and orderly. I wonder if their pantry is as organized as their photo is and what is up with spending $500.00/week to feed 4 people? Anyone else spend that much per week?

BEARS, BEETS, BATTLESTAR GALACTICA
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It seemed like the families with teenagers had the most processed foods.

About the German family--did you see how much wine and beer they had? I think that probably accounts for a large part of their $500/week.

Anyone know what those bread/pastry things the woman from Ulaanbaatar was holding up? They looked good!

I love how the Japanese girl is hugging her bag of nori potato chips.

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I have that book, and it is one of the most interesting books I ever bought. I too was shocked at the consumption of processed food and fast food the US family had over the other families. At the time I bought this book I was doing the low carb diet thing and this book got me to stop and really think about that idea.

facinating book!

"I eat fat back, because bacon is too lean"

-overheard from a 105 year old man

"The only time to eat diet food is while waiting for the steak to cook" - Julia Child

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It seemed like the families with teenagers had the most processed foods.

About the German family--did you see how much wine and beer they had?  I think that probably accounts for a large part of their $500/week. 

Anyone know what those bread/pastry things the woman from Ulaanbaatar was holding up?  They looked good!

I love how the Japanese girl is hugging her bag of nori potato chips.

I think the pastry things may be the mutton dumplings.

Just took another look and think I'm weong. They look more like a sweet of some kind.

Edited by BarbaraY (log)
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