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I have made up a batch of torakris's bulgogi marinade and put it on some thin-sliced beef from Uwajimaya. Tonight: my first attempt at homemade dolsot bibimbap, topped with the beef, kimchi, spinach, bean sprouts, and of course an egg. Delicious or disaster, you'll hear about it.

Anyone know how to make the bean sprout panchan? I'll probably just blanch them if I can't figure it out.

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Okay, the bibimbap came out okay for a first try, but not great.

1. I cooked the rice with too much water. Oops. I can fix this one myself.

2. The bowls weren't hot enough to crisp the rice. They were cool by the time I was done eating, which is definitely a problem. I heated them for about half an hour in a 450 degree oven. I can crank the oven up higher and heat them longer, but will that take me into crispy range? On this awesome dolsot bibimbap site the guy heats his dolsots on the stove. Unfortunately, I have neither gas burner nor flame tamer. Should I get a flame tamer and try the stovetop method?

Torakris's bulgogi marinade was superb. Absolutely no complaints about the beef.

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Torakris's bulgogi marinade was superb.  Absolutely no complaints about the beef.

:biggrin:

I have only eaten them witht the dolsots warmed on the stove (gas flame), they don't sound like they were hot enough, no suggestions however...

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Unfortunately, I have neither gas burner nor flame tamer.  Should I get a flame tamer and try the stovetop method?

Why would you need a flame tamer? What would happen if you put the bowl directly on the element?

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I tried to make dolsot bibimbap on my electric stove (no gas burners in my building), and my bowls developed huge cracks... no longer usable as they leak water.. :sad: So maybe that is why you need the flame tamer...

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I didn't purchase them intently for home cooking, but I have two small Coleman portable burners that I have found useful not only for hiking, but for certain in-home kitchen tasks such as roasting peppers (it takes forever on my electric coils) and certain cookware. I got mine from a surplus store several years ago for about $10 a pop. I find it useful to get at least a moderate gas flame in my ultra-modern :hmmm: electric kitchen.

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Today I'm going to experiment by cranking the oven (I think mine can go to 550) and leaving the dolsots in for an hour or so. If that's not hot enough, it's flame tamer time. Nothing must come between me and my dolsot bibimbap, except a flame tamer.

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Why would a flame-tamer be needed when using a gas stove? I would think that the heat would be pretty much even. I wonder if this is mostly a need for electric stoves...

Also, I find it interesting that the site recommends not preheating the dolsots, which seems to go against other instructions I have seen. According to the writer preheating can cause spalling (the breaking off of chips, scales, or slabs). I've preheated mine in the past, but perhaps will try doing it this way instead. Thoughts/experiences?

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I just fire up the flat top (griddle) and put them there. Around 450 F. After twenty minutes I load them. Give them about ten minutes, crack the eggs. No problem.

mamster, perhaps you should try the metal "dolsots"? Or a small sukiyaki pot?

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Okay, the superhot oven did not help, so I'm going to try the stovetop/flame tamer route. Thanks, Jinmyo. If that doesn't work, I'll get some metal ones.

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Okay, the superhot oven did not help, so I'm going to try the stovetop/flame tamer route.  Thanks, Jinmyo.  If that doesn't work, I'll get some metal ones.

*bump*

mamster - what ever happened? has anyone tried this on a "ceramic-topped" electric range? (using quotes, because danged if the thing doesn't look - and shatter like - glass)

what if i got a stone one and put it under the broiler? mmm, dolsot bibimbap. i've been aching to try this. the korean place i go to doesn't do the dolsot version, and i've been willing to let that slide given the divine pancake and tender bulgogi. but i dearly want that crunch.

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Aha, I did try the stone bowls on the stovetop, and it still didn't work. I am planning to get the metal sukiyaki bowls but haven't gotten around to it.

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I just can't get enough! :biggrin:

Last night

gallery_6134_119_9851.jpg

I marinated the tuna in a Hawaiian poke style (with soy sauce, sesame oil and pine nuts) and also had a vinegared salad of daikon and carrots, bean sprouts seasoned with sesame oil and sesame seeds and chrysanthemum leaves with sesame oil and seeds and a bit of soy. Kochujang in the middle.

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Kris-

What you have there is a combination of hwedupbap and bimbimbap.

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My wife has a question. Bibimbap is one of her favorite dishes. She has been to Korea dozens of times (over 100) several of these trips included culinary tours of South Korea (a treat from her parents). Bibimbap has always been considered a "proper" dish in her mother's kitchen as well, not just hodgepodge of leftovers. She has never, ever seen bibimbap served with kimchi and tofu as part of the mix (in the bowl, to be bimbim) or whatever other leftovers. Not to say these versions can't be tasty enough.

So the question is, Are there (if so where) restaurants serving bimbimbap with tofu, kimchi or what not that's "leftover"?

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I don't think I have ever thought of bibimbap as a place to use up leftovers.....

I have always made it with freshly made toppings.

I don't really care for kimchi in my bibimbap,though I don't mind eating it along side, but I have seen it served that way here in Japan in numerous restaurants.

Tofu? I have never seen that before, but I could imagine if it was done right it could be good.

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A little bibimbap background information. It originated in the city of jeonju. So if you see a Korean restaurant referring to "jeonju bibimbap" they are making some attempt at replicating the traditional dish which looks like this:

http://www.jeonju.go.kr/eng2004/162.asp

Yes over 30 ingredients! Jeonju is in the Jeolla region, this area (incidentally where my MIL is from) is one of the most fertile areas in Korea. It's their equivilant of the Burgundy and Rhone.

This http://www.clickkorea.org/Food/foodView.as...age=1&menubar=4

is the more common "standard" version. The ingredients I mean, not the presentatton.

And my wife's favorite yukueh bibimbap

http://english.tour2korea.com/05food/Local...sm=m5_3&konum=6

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Hey there bibimbap fans! I need your advice!

I'm cooking bibimbap for 51 adults and 13 children tomorrow. How much food should I prepare? I cook for this many people on a regular basis, but I'm usually going from a recipe that I can extrapolate serving size from. For this though, I'm on my own.

So far I'm planning 1/4 lb of tofu or beef per person. 1 cup of cooked rice per person, plus some extra. From there, I have no idea.

I'm planning four toppings - cucumbers (salted, rinsed, and dressed with some rice wine vinegar), spinach (wilted and dressed with soy sauce and sesame seeds), carrots (shredded/julienned, blanched, and tossed with a little sesame oil), bean sprouts (blanched and tossed with a little sesame oil). Any thoughts on how much of each I should make? (Or different preparation techniques for the bean sprouts or carrots?)

How many people would a good size cucumber serve? 4? 6? I know I'll need a LOT of raw spinach to get to any reasonable quantity of cooked stuff. I'll be buying 1 lb bags of organic pre-washed baby spinach - how many do you think I should get?

Help! (And thanks.)

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You go!

Click here for some very helpful advice from eGulleteers concerning my first full-on attempts at bibimbap.

I'd go for (brace yourself) ten pounds of spinach, about ten medium cucumbers (or thirty kirbys, or five "English" or seedless monsters), about fifty medium carrots, and five pounds of bean sprouts. I'd also add some seaweed, which you'd just have to reconstitute in warm water, and a nice, fat pickled daikon, which you'd just have to julienne.

You must post photos!

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Thanks, Chris - very helpful suggestions.

The meal went really well. I did most of my shopping at the Korean grocery in town, and that was quite the experience as hardly anything was in English. But I managed to find all of the things that I needed. I stopped at a few other stores to pick up other items.

I'd made a mistake in my original posting - I actually had 41 adults and 13 children, so not quite as many as I thought.

What I ended up using:

10 lbs of rice

~7 lbs of beef (pre-sliced for bulgogi)

4 lbs of tofu

24 Kirby cucumbers (at least, that's my guess - they were labled "pickles" in the Korean market)

10 lbs of carrots

6 1/2 lbs of spinach (would have bought more, but the store only had a few of the large 1-lb packages)

5? lbs of bean sprouts (might have been more - it was six bags - a bunch anyway)

1 pickled daikon radish

6 dozen eggs

I had just about the right amount of everything. There were a lot of carrots left - 5 lbs probably would have been fine, but the single bag just looked so small. There was enough of everything to get people through the first pass through the line (I served it buffet style and let people top their own bowls), and then things slowly disappeared as people came up for seconds.

I used torakris's recipe for the bulgogi marinade for both the beef and the tofu, and it was great. For my tastes, it would be better with a little acidity, so next time I'll add some sake or vinegar or something.

We poached the eggs, which worked well for preparing and holding so many runny yolk eggs.

I'll write in more detail about method and stuff over in my Dinner for 40 thread, but I just wanted to stop in here to say thanks!

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I'm a lacto vegetarian - my dad spent many years in Korea as a taekwondo athlete/instructor, and my mom learned how to cook a number of delicious Korean dishes such as bibmpap. The way we do it is just really simple- we saute all of the vegetables with a little bit of sesame oil and/or sesame seeds and or with garlic/chives/leeks- personally, I like it even if the veggies (carrots/cucumber/baby corn-optional/spinach/soy bean sprouts etc) are just steamed and mixed with a little bit of sesame oil.. then we also make this fried tofu dish cooked in that hot-paste that usually comes in red tubs (not so sure about the spelling!) mixed with a little soy sauce, sugar, pepper, and water plus a bit of sesame oil and seeds(optional on the seeds).. we also make the sweetened potato dish/appetizer... :)

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the best bibimbap i've ever had was made by a Korean kid at a youth hostel on North Shore Oahu. Simple, simple, simple. I mean, have you ever seen hostel kitchens? And no exotic ingredients. Button mushrooms, bean sprouts, scallions, egg. It's the sesame oil and the red spicy-sweet stuff. Thats the key.

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