Jump to content

KennethT

participating member
  • Content Count

    2,805
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Posts posted by KennethT


  1. I saw these in a local NYC supermarket today:

    20191006_144524_HDR.thumb.jpg.14b2927158b13ac3dcde106ed45d5863.jpg

     

    I didn't buy any - not only were they tiny (much smaller than I've seen anywhere in Asia) but they were hard as rocks... Never a good sign.

    • Sad 2

  2. 34 minutes ago, weinoo said:

     

    5Wna67R.jpg?1

     

    The haricots were from Trader Joe's (Guatemala) and the lamb was from Trader Joe's; it's grass-fed New Zealand, and it was tasty enough.  

     

    The lamb was roasted in the CSO, after being salted and hanging out in the fridge for 6-8 hours. The haricots, butter braised.  The Yukon gold potatoes, tossed with olive oil, salt, pepper and pimentón, and steam roasted in the CSO. 

    Were the potatoes and lamb cooked at the same time, or do you have more than 1 CSO in your kitchen?

    • Like 1

  3. 17 minutes ago, dcarch said:

    Last night, I took out a large container, filled it with water and put about 20 very ripe tomatoes from my garden, some very big and some very small. I closed the contained with a lid. Then I shook and shook the container the hardest I could. I shook again for about another 5 more times. 

     

    Now, I don't have huge muscles, but in the past few weeks, I have had to relocate and transported a clothes washer and a dishwasher all by myself with no problem. The shaking I did to the tomatoes were more violent than any deep potholes you would run into if you had to ship the tomatoes by car.

     

    Well I am happy to report that there is no damage to any tomatoes, not a scratch, not any sign of cracking or bruising.

     

    But I am not surprised. It's just very simple physics.

     

    I assume that if you have to ship a few hundred eggs over rough roads, the same method will work.

     

    Time for a BLT :B!

     

    dcarch

    That's fine, but how much did that container filled with water weigh?


  4. The best thign about the wine atlas is that if you're a member of Purple Pages - Jancis' Robinson's website, you also get online access to the wine atlas - and it's searchable!


  5. 29 minutes ago, Tri2Cook said:


    I apologize. I realize this is off-topic and I generally try to avoid doing that. But I can't just let this thread roll on like you didn't even say that. A (as in, one) $20 strawberry? Really?

    Yep. A. Single. Strawberry.

    • Like 1
    • Confused 1

  6. I'm curious what your experiments will yield.  I haven't tried the paste in the tubs in many years - so I wonder if they'll taste any different than the cans.  Back then, I did like the canned better than  the tub.


  7. 1 minute ago, rotuts said:

    if I end u[p using these bags , in spite of the NaCl

     

    I plan to cut the bag open just a bit at the top 

     

    use what I use

     

    then place that bag , flat , in a larger VacBag  , then vac and freeze

     

    Ill open the vac'd bag and take out what I need from the Fz paste , then re-seal in that same vac BAG

     

    Thats the current plan.   Im quite the Oriental Condiment PacRat.  I must have thrown out a zillion jars of

     

    mighty interesting stuff that was years old from my refrig.  Im trying a new plan

     

    later today , when two Oriental Markets in my area open, Ill get a couple of those ' cat food ' cans

     

    and compare them to the bags.  its been a disappointment that the tubs have so much salt.

     

    I should have realized this , but did not.

    I looked yesterday at my cat food cans... they certainly are not salt free... but, I don't think they taste as salty as the shelf stable ones, plus, I think the taste is fresher.  Also, keep in mind that most of the curry pastes that I've seen don't include shrimp paste - so you typically need to add a bit yourself.  Also, a panang curry (which I love) typically has ground peanuts, which are also not included in the pastes, so that has to be added also.

    • Thanks 1

  8. 4 minutes ago, Shelby said:

    This is a really dumb question, but I'm curious.

     

    The pastes come in a bag inside the tub.  When you open the bag do you dump it in the tub?  I kept mine in the bag and smooshed it back into the tub.  Did I do it wrong?

    That's what I would do....  I think they put the bag in a tub for shelf presentation. Keeping it in the bag will keep it fresher longer.

    • Like 1

  9. 27 minutes ago, Anna N said:

    How about popping the tomatoes into Asian pear sleeves and then  into pantyhose and tie the ends. The tomato snake can then nestled into a hard sided container. I dare you to do this in New York City and not get laughed out of existence. But I bet it would work. 😂😂😂
     

    Edited to add: it is best if you step out of the pantyhose before attempting this.

     

    Please... I've seen much more interesting things on the street than that!  No one would even look twice at a tomato snake...

    • Like 1
    • Haha 4

  10. 4 minutes ago, chromedome said:

    There are sealable plastic containers in almost every size and shape imaginable. I expect you could find one to suit the size of tomato you're hauling.

    Plastic is less than ideal from the sustainability perspective, but if you're using the non-disposable kind and use them until they fall apart, it's not so bad.

    Yeah, I like that rigid container idea... but it can also be in the form of a cardboard box.  I saw this thing in Japan where they were selling $20 strawberries (each berry was $20) - it came in a rigid cardboard box filled with that plastic bedding material that you see around Easter time, and the strawberry was nestled in there... granted, strawberries are a lot lighter and so easier to protect one by one, but I think something to that idea would work well.


  11. I'm not a fan of Maesri in the tub - it tastes mostly of salt.  The best premade pastes I've had were Nittiya, which must be kept refrigerated.  Next to that, I like the Maesri in the "cat food" can - since it's canned, they don't need to use as much salt to keep it shelf stable.

     

    I'm a fan of hot-thai-kitchen.com and her YouTube site... very informative...

    • Like 1

  12. 2 hours ago, Hassouni said:

     

    And here they are. The gunk is next level. As someone else said, it's almost as if they've been shellacked, except that shellack isn't sticky. How the hell do you get this stuff off?

     

    My last set weren't this bad at all

     

     

     

    I have an industrial grade vapor degreaser that I imagine would work very well!  Seriously - what about "degreaser in a can" - usually available at autoparts stores, or maybe oven cleaner?


  13. 27 minutes ago, Dante said:

    Tonight's dinner: pork and chive dumplings, and Chinese cabbage and leek, dumplings from Dumps-A-GoGo accompanied by greens and fennel sauteed with chinkiang vinegar, roasted sesame seed paste, and butter.

     

    71135708_2439815986101162_199382848715620352_n (1).jpg

    Those dumplings look good - too bad the company has such an unfortunate name!

    • Haha 2

  14. Yes, I love the combination of green peppercorns, kaffir lime leaf and grachai - which is sometimes called lesser ginger... it has a very distinctive flavor and tastes nothing like ginger... it is similar to galangal but different... hard to describe - I've never tasted anything like it, but now keep a package of it in my freezer.

    • Like 1

  15. I love fresh peppercorns in the cluster.  One of my favorite (but now closed :( ) thai restaurants used to serve a few dishes that use fresh peppercorns - I don't know where they got them from - but they weren't preserved, they were fresh and had such a fantastic flavor... very different from the dried or preserved ones... before that place in NYC, the only place I had seen fresh peppercorns was in SE Asia.  At one point, i was actually thinking about growing them!

    • Like 1
×
×
  • Create New...