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janeer

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Everything posted by janeer

  1. There is a thread here on Peter Rinehart's Whole Grain baking book: http://forums.egullet.org/index.php?showtopic=106329
  2. I like all lard or butter and lard. My Webpage
  3. That is an amazing amount of precise and, to me, useful work--glad it was you who did it, though, and not me. I have wonderful eggs here, but have not tried baking with duck eggs, so definitely will next time I make a custard. Thanks. My Webpage
  4. I have been making a lot of soups lately, to use up stocks and take advantage of great farm stand bargains, like $5 heirloom tomatoes. Here is authentic gazpacho, pasta e fagioli made with turkey stock and fresh cranberry beans, and spiced tomato soup made from a base I make and freeze every year. My Webpage
  5. NO! Hominy has been treated with lye. You should order what you need online.
  6. It will be a different bread; it will have a different color, and probably a different texture. But if your cornmeal is stone-ground, and your corn flour is very soft, it may be OK. But it will not be the Pao de Milho you know and love--which is always white. Also, your bread may be wetter or dryer, as every grain is different and I don't know what you are using. But I hope this recipe at least gives you a baseline to experiment from--I think the amount of liquid will be the variable (I like my Pao de Milho on the wet side). I'm curious: are you Portuguese, or from a Portuguese area? My Webpage ← I thought the bread would be different with yellow cornmeal and cornflour, because the bread I buy is always whitish. I also like my bread on the wet side. I'm not Portuguese. I'm from Toronto, which has significant Portuguese populations in certain areas. There is a substantial area that is sometimes referred to as "Portugal Village," which is more concentrated in some parts and less in others. So, when I'm in Toronto, l have access to several Portuguese bakeries and grocers, most of whom sell Pao de Milho. ← I didn't know Tortonto had a Portuguese community. You should be able to buy white corn flour at a local grocer, and possibly white cornmeal. You can also order white cornmeal from one of the sources listed on my blog site, such as Gray's or Kenyon's. My Webpage
  7. It will be a different bread; it will have a different color, and probably a different texture. But if your cornmeal is stone-ground, and your corn flour is very soft, it may be OK. But it will not be the Pao de Milho you know and love--which is always white. Also, your bread may be wetter or dryer, as every grain is different and I don't know what you are using. But I hope this recipe at least gives you a baseline to experiment from--I think the amount of liquid will be the variable (I like my Pao de Milho on the wet side). I'm curious: are you Portuguese, or from a Portuguese area? My Webpage
  8. janeer

    Heirloom tomatoes

    I thought you would enjoy seeing the box of tomatoes I just bought for $5.00; that's right , folks, five dollars. I just made a ton of traditional gazpacho, spiced tomato soup base for the freezer, and am eating them (as I have been all summer) in salads and BLT's. www.littlecomptonmornings.blogspost.com
  9. Pao de Mihlo is also one of my absolute favorites. I am fortunate enough to be able to buy it from numerous suppliers, but I also make it and I think mine is very good. You can try my recipe, given here: My Webpage
  10. I have never heard of this, and would never have thought of trying it, but he apparently was looking for something softer even than cake or pastry flour. I'd probably trust him, and try it. If you do, please let us know what you think. I wonder how it would roll. www.littlecomptonmornings.blogspot.com
  11. Interesting question. Now that you mention it: I never measure salt or spices, whether for baking or cooking: I just know. I don't measure anything else for cooking, really, either, except maybe when making a tricky sauce. For cakes, I measure/weigh flour, sugar, and liquid. Pastry is more according to judgment; it's visual. And I don't follow strict times, either.Little Compton Mornings
  12. Diana Kennedy's first book, The Cuisines of Mexico(I have them all) is a must have, in my opinion. I too like Patricia Quintana's The Food of Mexico; it's beautiful, also.Little Compton Mornings
  13. Here is the blog of someone who cooked her way, in order (such discipline), through Maida Heatter's first cookie book, which is a very good book: http://mondayswithmaida.blogspot.com/2004/...da-archive.html I pretty much, although not as a task, cooked my way through Diana Kennedy's first book, The Cuisines of Mexico, when it came out, through Lenotre's baking book, and through Marcia Adams's Cooking from Quilt Country, which is the food I grew up on. Also have made pretty much everything in Marcella Hazan's first two books, and Madeline Kamman's The Way to Cook. A friend of mine and I have been talking about cooking through Sherry Yard's baking book, in order, but so far we havn't gotten past the first chapter! Little Compton Mornings
  14. I loved Pleasures of Cooking, particularly the last page, which was a recipe contributed by a reader (which one a prize, if they printed it, as I recall). For years and years I made the wonderful stollen recipe that was printed in the back of one of the issues. Alas, I lost all my Pleasures of Cooking in a move. On a side note, during the 1970s I worked for the brother of the man who brought the Cuisinarat to America, Carl Sontheimer.Little Compton Mornings
  15. Only thing is, I don't consider it embarassing: I collect them, and love every one. But someone else might think that "What You Can Do with Jell-o" or The Eagle Brand Condensed Milk "70 Magic Recipes" were embarassing. Little Compton Mornings
  16. With frozen berries, don't add water. Add additional spice according to your preferences: I like clove, cardamom, and cinnamon, and a little lemon. Blueberries should always taste spicey. But I wonder why you are using frozen berries: this is July, National Blueberry Month. Fresh berries are everywhere, and would give you a fresher tasting product. My Webpage
  17. janeer

    Pithiviers

    I adore pithiviers. I make an almond pithiviers from a recipe I got in cooking school. I've also made the ham pithiviers in Julia Childand Company. I never see it in bakeries these days, unfortunately, and I don't have time to make it often--holidays, mostly.Little Compton Mornings
  18. Thank you for bringing this to our attention. I have an ancient copy of her baking book and a first edition of her first cookie book. Both are well used. I love the rugelah recipe with the cream-cheese dough.Little Compton Mornings
  19. I see that others have mentioned their own blogs, so if that's OK, here is the address of my relatively new (6 weeks) blog with an emphasis on seasonal cooking in Rhode Island. http://www.littlecomptonmornings.blogspot.com/
  20. I have used duck fat as part of the fat in pie crust. Also, it is really good for sauteeing greens. www.littlecomptonmornings.blogspot.com
  21. Madelines, scented with lavendar or rose. Can dip the edge in chocolate. More skill involved than eclairs or creme puffs, tho both are nice.
  22. janeer

    Apple Pie

    Most reliable all-around excellent: Cortlands, Macouns, Winsaps. Jonathans OK, Norhter Spys nice, any Delicious is awful and inappropriate for pie. Love macs for applesauce; my mother used them for pies and they were tasty but very soft. RI Greenings very nice but hard to find--even in RI! Granny Smiths are not flavorful and I find them dry, not juicy when ripe; sometimes they are watery, but that's from storage, not the way they should be. Don't know the Arkansas, I'll look for it. I've been making apple pies for 30 years--it is my absolute favorite thing in the world to have for breakfast.
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