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David J.

Tempered chocolate goo

8 posts in this topic

Just this Sunday I tempered a batch of Callubet bittersweet chocolate for Fluer De Sel caramels and it flowed beautifully. Monday and today I molded with white chocolate and that worked out ok. But today I tried the bittersweet again and it just curled up in the tempering machine several times thicker than Sunday night. I tried it once again thinking that perhaps I had left a drop or two of water in divider, but it was just as bad.

The humidity is 52% even with the air conditioner running and keeping the temp in my basement workshop down to 68 degrees F. Is this just too high? Do I need to make an emergency run for a dehumidifier? I've got three more batches to make for wedding favors for a reception on Saturday and I don't want to have to roll them all in cocoa!

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I don't know the humidity level in the air that chocolate can handle but the humidity most definitely will make the chocolate seize. I have had this experience on a reasonably cool rainy day where the kitchen window was open and enough humidity got into the kitchen that my chocolate kept seizing.

Sounds like a de-humidifier is what you need, unfortunately!

Hugs Squirrelly Cakes

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Yup, I'm inclined to agree - humidity thickens the chocolate. I haven't been tempering anything this week but I was over at a friends yesterday who was putting together a big order of milk chocolates in a room cooled only by a window air conditioner and that chocolate was at the perfect temperature and was thick enough to stand a spoon up in.

I'm tempering tonight but we got a brand new air conditioner and furnace last fall and the humidity remains 45% year round so I'm not anticipating an problems.

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Yup,  I'm inclined to agree - humidity thickens the chocolate.  I haven't been tempering anything this week but I was over at a friends yesterday who was putting together a big order of milk chocolates in a room cooled only by a window air conditioner and that chocolate was at the perfect temperature and was thick enough to stand a spoon up in.

I'm tempering tonight but we got a brand new air conditioner and furnace last fall and the humidity remains 45% year round so I'm not anticipating an problems.

That's what was happening to me. My chocovision Rev 2 was melting the chocolate and it started bunching up right next to the scraper right away. Even at 108 degrees F it was a blob. When the temper cycle was finished I dipped a fork into the goo and lifted a peak an inch tall.

I would just wait for cooler weather but I am under the gun for time so I think that I will purchase a dehumidifier to augment the central air. I can't think of any variable other than humidity since I'm using the same cycle on the same tempering machine and made sure it was perfectly dry after washing.

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Be aware that dehumidifers can increase the temp in your room while they're reducing the moisture.

Cheers,

Steve


Steve Smith

Glacier Country

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Well I knew I had seen the information on room humidity levels somewhere. I keep the house as a constant 68-70F and have central air so it was never an issue for me - until hubby decided to open the window so the female cat boss of the house, could get some fresh air.

It came up in a conversation with a few chocolatier pals of mine.

Here it is.

Tempering (Room) Conditions- Tempering chocolate in a room that is warmer than 72 degrees F is difficult and often impossible because the temper temperature becomes too close to the room temperature. As a result, there isn't enough temperature difference for the process to finish properly. Tempering is best done in a room that is between 68 and 72 degrees F with humidity levels below 50%. Also, keep high voltage lamps from shining onto the chocolate since this will add unwanted heat. An air-conditioned room is recommended in the summer months.

http://www.edaten.com/id26.htm


Edited by Squirrelly Cakes (log)

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Well I knew I had seen the information on room humidity levels somewhere.  I keep the house as a constant 68-70F and have central air so it was never an issue for me - until hubby decided to open the window so the female cat boss of the house, could get some fresh air.

It came up in a conversation with a few chocolatier pals of mine.

Here it is.

Tempering (Room) Conditions- Tempering chocolate in a room that is warmer than 72 degrees F is difficult and often impossible because the temper temperature becomes too close to the room temperature. As a result, there isn't enough temperature difference for the process to finish properly. Tempering is best done in a room that is between 68 and 72 degrees F with humidity levels below 50%. Also, keep high voltage lamps from shining onto the chocolate since this will add unwanted heat. An air-conditioned room is recommended in the summer months.

http://www.edaten.com/id26.htm

Thanks for the specific humidity level. My temperature was perfect at 68 degrees F but the humidity was about 52%. The humidity is predicted to range between 70 and 90% over the next two days so I am going to have to augment my central air with a dehumidifier if I want to get my production done before the weekend.

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Good luck! Isn't this high humidity weather wonderful, grrhh! I have some fondant flowers to make and am waiting for it to drop too. Even with a gum hardener added, the humidity creates problems. With the central air, all doors and windows closed and working on the main floor of the house, I find after several days of this weather, the humidity still gets into the house.

Hope you are able to get your chocolate work done!

Hugs Squirrelly Cakes

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