Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create an account.

Sign in to follow this  
David J.

Tempered chocolate goo

Recommended Posts

Just this Sunday I tempered a batch of Callubet bittersweet chocolate for Fluer De Sel caramels and it flowed beautifully. Monday and today I molded with white chocolate and that worked out ok. But today I tried the bittersweet again and it just curled up in the tempering machine several times thicker than Sunday night. I tried it once again thinking that perhaps I had left a drop or two of water in divider, but it was just as bad.

The humidity is 52% even with the air conditioner running and keeping the temp in my basement workshop down to 68 degrees F. Is this just too high? Do I need to make an emergency run for a dehumidifier? I've got three more batches to make for wedding favors for a reception on Saturday and I don't want to have to roll them all in cocoa!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't know the humidity level in the air that chocolate can handle but the humidity most definitely will make the chocolate seize. I have had this experience on a reasonably cool rainy day where the kitchen window was open and enough humidity got into the kitchen that my chocolate kept seizing.

Sounds like a de-humidifier is what you need, unfortunately!

Hugs Squirrelly Cakes

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yup, I'm inclined to agree - humidity thickens the chocolate. I haven't been tempering anything this week but I was over at a friends yesterday who was putting together a big order of milk chocolates in a room cooled only by a window air conditioner and that chocolate was at the perfect temperature and was thick enough to stand a spoon up in.

I'm tempering tonight but we got a brand new air conditioner and furnace last fall and the humidity remains 45% year round so I'm not anticipating an problems.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Yup,  I'm inclined to agree - humidity thickens the chocolate.  I haven't been tempering anything this week but I was over at a friends yesterday who was putting together a big order of milk chocolates in a room cooled only by a window air conditioner and that chocolate was at the perfect temperature and was thick enough to stand a spoon up in.

I'm tempering tonight but we got a brand new air conditioner and furnace last fall and the humidity remains 45% year round so I'm not anticipating an problems.

That's what was happening to me. My chocovision Rev 2 was melting the chocolate and it started bunching up right next to the scraper right away. Even at 108 degrees F it was a blob. When the temper cycle was finished I dipped a fork into the goo and lifted a peak an inch tall.

I would just wait for cooler weather but I am under the gun for time so I think that I will purchase a dehumidifier to augment the central air. I can't think of any variable other than humidity since I'm using the same cycle on the same tempering machine and made sure it was perfectly dry after washing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Be aware that dehumidifers can increase the temp in your room while they're reducing the moisture.

Cheers,

Steve

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well I knew I had seen the information on room humidity levels somewhere. I keep the house as a constant 68-70F and have central air so it was never an issue for me - until hubby decided to open the window so the female cat boss of the house, could get some fresh air.

It came up in a conversation with a few chocolatier pals of mine.

Here it is.

Tempering (Room) Conditions- Tempering chocolate in a room that is warmer than 72 degrees F is difficult and often impossible because the temper temperature becomes too close to the room temperature. As a result, there isn't enough temperature difference for the process to finish properly. Tempering is best done in a room that is between 68 and 72 degrees F with humidity levels below 50%. Also, keep high voltage lamps from shining onto the chocolate since this will add unwanted heat. An air-conditioned room is recommended in the summer months.

http://www.edaten.com/id26.htm


Edited by Squirrelly Cakes (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Well I knew I had seen the information on room humidity levels somewhere.  I keep the house as a constant 68-70F and have central air so it was never an issue for me - until hubby decided to open the window so the female cat boss of the house, could get some fresh air.

It came up in a conversation with a few chocolatier pals of mine.

Here it is.

Tempering (Room) Conditions- Tempering chocolate in a room that is warmer than 72 degrees F is difficult and often impossible because the temper temperature becomes too close to the room temperature. As a result, there isn't enough temperature difference for the process to finish properly. Tempering is best done in a room that is between 68 and 72 degrees F with humidity levels below 50%. Also, keep high voltage lamps from shining onto the chocolate since this will add unwanted heat. An air-conditioned room is recommended in the summer months.

http://www.edaten.com/id26.htm

Thanks for the specific humidity level. My temperature was perfect at 68 degrees F but the humidity was about 52%. The humidity is predicted to range between 70 and 90% over the next two days so I am going to have to augment my central air with a dehumidifier if I want to get my production done before the weekend.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Good luck! Isn't this high humidity weather wonderful, grrhh! I have some fondant flowers to make and am waiting for it to drop too. Even with a gum hardener added, the humidity creates problems. With the central air, all doors and windows closed and working on the main floor of the house, I find after several days of this weather, the humidity still gets into the house.

Hope you are able to get your chocolate work done!

Hugs Squirrelly Cakes

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sign in to follow this  

  • Similar Content

    • By pastrygirl
      Has anyone successfully replaced the power cord on a mol d' art melter?  Is it easy or do I have to send it somewhere, and if so, where?  Thought I'd check here for DIY info before contacting TCF.
       
      My 6kg melter has reached the point where the cord has to be in that just right position to conduct power, and just right can be elusive.  I've had it for several years so it's seen some use, am hoping it's a simple repair, i.e. can be done with a screwdriver or passed off to one of my handier brothers in exchange for candy.
       
      thanks!
    • By secast1992
      So I've been experiencing cracks on the foot of my bonbons that I've been unable to find the cause of, hoping to reach out to the community to get to the bottom of this costly problem. 
       
      I work for a small chocolate company that makes our own bean to bar couverture. We use a continuous tempering machine with enrobing belt attachment. 
      The process: ganache is made and then piped into round silicone molds, which are then footed with tempered chocolate before being placed in the freezer until frozen enough to pop out of the molds. They are then set up right and left to thaw and dry out overnight on a equipped with fans aimed at the bonbons. The next day we send the bonbons through the enrober, and then they are transferred to a speed rack to set up, either at room temp (generally around 68-70 degrees F) or in a homemade cooling cabinet (an insulated box equipped with an air conditioner + dehumidifier + fans) that generally fluctuates between 50-56 degrees F (I know, large range). 
       
      Problems occur with both milk and dark couverture, with bonbons kept at room temp or in cabinet, thickness of foot doesn't seem to make a difference (we've tried thicker and thinner). Crack doesn't immediately appear; it usually takes a couple of minutes after being completely set before showing. It looks as though the foot is popping out, cause a hairline crack between the shell and the foot. I've attached pictures. You'll notice in the photos, that when the bonbon is cut in half, the foot separates from the shell pretty significantly. 
       
      Thoughts? Suggestions? Similar experiences? 
       





    • By artiesel
      Does anyone have any experience using Knobel depositing machines?
       
      My one shot plate is leaking chocolate out of the top and I can't determine why.
       
      Any help would be appreciated
       
    • By artiesel
      I was curious if anyone has any experience making aerated chocolate candy (similar to those demonstrated by Grewling in Chocolates and Confections) that does NOT use a warmed ISI siphon to achieve this affect...  https://www.pinterest.com/pin/827255025273299428/
       
      I was wondering if it might be possible to adapt a large siphon so that you could attach a large tank of compressed CO2 or NO to avoid the expense of all the little gas canisters?
       
      Or am I just dreaming of something that's impossible?
    • By pastrygirl
      What are the best, darkest chocolates you've found in wholesale quantities?  Aside from 100%, that is ... I'm thinking in the 75-90% range, available in quantities of 5-20 kg.  It's definitely niche, but between the chocolate nerds and the low-carb-ers there's a market.
       
      Right now, 72% Felchlin Arriba is the darkest I use, in a bar with candied orange.   I have not tried their Elvesia 74% or Sao Palme 75% but it looks like I can get them from AUI.  A Felchlin 88% exists, but would be a special order arriving in a few months (their next container shipment?).  
       
      Valrhona makes the Abinao 85% but that would be another special order.  I'm pretty sure I tried it at one point and liked it.  Does anyone keep it in stock?
       
      How is KaKao Berlin?  They have a Brandenberg 75% but I'm not familiar with the brand.
       
      Any others?  Or I could make my own and have the super dark be my one bean-to bar flavor ...
       
      thanks!
       
       
       
       
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×