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Gilt


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i went by the kitchen to say hello to paul

the tentative menu is very strong

the space and kitchen are incredible

it has the bones to be the best restaurant in nyc

interesting to see how the affair bruni works its magic

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i went by the kitchen to say hello to paul

the tentative menu is very strong

the space and kitchen are incredible

it has the bones to be the best restaurant in nyc

interesting to see how the affair bruni works its magic

What type of menu?

Prix Fixe?

Time past and time future

What might have been and what has been

Point to one end, which is always present.

- T.S. Eliot

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paul's new place?

Paul's new place? Has Liebrandt become a one name chef? My first thought was Prudhomme. Actually "who was Paul?" was my first thought. I never made it to Atlas, but I caught a brief apperance at a little restaurant in the West Village some year's back. I have to say, I was unconvinced by my meal. I recall a dish with chocolate and scallops that left me puzzled in a way even the occassional unconvincing dish at elBulli did not. Nor was it so shockingly unpalatable as a series of acrid desserts at Gagnaire once. It was just that no combination of the the tastes in any order gave me a clue as to how the whole might be as good as the sum of the parts. For what it's worth, the scallops were exquisitely cooked and I was a little sorry I doggedly tried to find some reward in the combination. I will, nevertheless, look forward to another chance.

Robert Buxbaum

WorldTable

Recent WorldTable posts include: comments about reporting on Michelin stars in The NY Times, the NJ proposal to ban foie gras, Michael Ruhlman's comments in blogs about the NJ proposal and Bill Buford's New Yorker article on the Food Network.

My mailbox is full. You may contact me via worldtable.com.

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Gilt was written up in the New York Times a couple of months ago. There was a really bad photo of "Paul," even. The restaurant is in the space formerly known as Le Cirque 2000, in the New York Palace hotel. Patrick Jouin redesigned the space.

There are some nice photos of Paul's work on his website: http://www.paulliebrandt.com/

I really enjoyed Paul's food at Atlas. At that time, New York City had a respectable claim to being part of the culinary avant garde. Now the center of gravity is in Chicago (Grant, Homaro) and Washington, DC (Jose). We have Wylie (we're doing first names, right?) but that's about it. I'd like to see more -- it can't be that the economics of doing business in New York make avant-garde cuisine impossible.

Steven A. Shaw aka "Fat Guy"
Co-founder, Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, sshaw@egstaff.org
Proud signatory to the eG Ethics code
Director, New Media Studies, International Culinary Center (take my food-blogging course)

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Thanks for the website link, F.G..

I dig the bloody, psuedo Greenaway vibe of some of the pix.

Very the Cook,the Thief, the Wife and the Lover, 'inint?

To my mind, Liebrandt or Paul, however you wish, deserves a bit of iconic one name status.

2317/5000

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paul's new place?

I have to say, I was unconvinced by my meal. I recall a dish with chocolate and scallops that left me puzzled in a way even the occassional unconvincing dish at elBulli did not. Nor was it so shockingly unpalatable as a series of acrid desserts at Gagnaire once. It was just that no combination of the the tastes in any order gave me a clue as to how the whole might be as good as the sum of the parts. For what it's worth, the scallops were exquisitely cooked and I was a little sorry I doggedly tried to find some reward in the combination.

I love avant-garde that is creative and daring so long that it tastes good or at least interesting. I was very disappointed with Gagnaire. I am not into culinary nihilism. I have yet to try Paul's work, however, I will keep an eye out and a mouth open for it. The photos are interesting, although the pig slaughter is just a tad on the macabre side. Whatever.

John Sconzo, M.D. aka "docsconz"

"Remember that a very good sardine is always preferable to a not that good lobster."

- Ferran Adria on eGullet 12/16/2004.

Docsconz - Musings on Food and Life

Slow Food Saratoga Region - Co-Founder

Twitter - @docsconz

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Gilt was written up in the New York Times a couple of months ago. There was a really bad photo of "Paul," even. The restaurant is in the space formerly known as Le Cirque 2000, in the New York Palace hotel. Patrick Jouin redesigned the space.

There are some nice photos of Paul's work on his website: http://www.paulliebrandt.com/

I really enjoyed Paul's food at Atlas. At that time, New York City had a respectable claim to being part of the culinary avant garde. Now the center of gravity is in Chicago (Grant, Homaro) and Washington, DC (Jose). We have Wylie (we're doing first names, right?) but that's about it. I'd like to see more -- it can't be that the economics of doing business in New York make avant-garde cuisine impossible.

It turns out that Florence Fabricant had an article on Gilt in the NY Times on October 5. I was in Venice.

I also suspect it's also more than just the economics of doing business in New York. I wonder if mind set and establishment have anything to do with it. New Yorkers know good food when they see it, and I don't mean that as a compliment. I mean it in the sense that New Yorkers may be cocky about knowing good food and seeing it as the food they already know here, as well as in Paris. A number of situations may be in play that allow gastronomes in DC and Chicago to be more receptive to new ideas in food. I can think of parallels in art movements where those with the greatest stock in the current schools seem to be the most sophisticated connoisseurs of art, but are unable to embrace or recognize the new. There would be no new art (or cooking, or fashion) were it not for the creators, but in order for them to flourish they need a receptive audience. Then again, even in Chicago there are but a few who are in this avant garde and perhaps fewer still in D.C. New York is hardly out of the running yet.

Robert Buxbaum

WorldTable

Recent WorldTable posts include: comments about reporting on Michelin stars in The NY Times, the NJ proposal to ban foie gras, Michael Ruhlman's comments in blogs about the NJ proposal and Bill Buford's New Yorker article on the Food Network.

My mailbox is full. You may contact me via worldtable.com.

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There would be no new art (or cooking, or fashion) were it not for the creators, but in order for them to flourish they need a receptive audience. Then again, even in Chicago there are but a few who are in this avant garde and perhaps fewer still in D.C. New York is hardly out of the running yet.

Bux, I would agree with this statement. I admire Jose Andres very much, but one 8 seat restaurant does not make a major center of the avant-garde no matter how good it is. Minibar may be one of the best restaurants in the US, avant-garde or otherwise, but its presence in DC says nothing about DC's willingness to embrace the avant-garde aesthetic. The lack of a more receptive audience in NY surprises and disappoints me. For all his faults, Rocco when at his peak at Union pacific was a very exciting chef. Other than Wylie where has that gone? This is why I am curious about Gilt.

John Sconzo, M.D. aka "docsconz"

"Remember that a very good sardine is always preferable to a not that good lobster."

- Ferran Adria on eGullet 12/16/2004.

Docsconz - Musings on Food and Life

Slow Food Saratoga Region - Co-Founder

Twitter - @docsconz

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I assumed that if people new what "gilt" was - they would know who paul was.  You have an interesting statement about the chocolate and scallops because "we" pair cod with white chocolate.

"White chocolate" is a misnomer. It's not really chocolate, but a component of chocolate, not that everyone seems to agree on what can be called chocolate by law. Cocoa butter, being the fat of the chocolate liquor, is very rich, while the intense chocolate flavor is in the cocoa powder. One is more about the taste while the other is more about mouth feel, though of course there is family resemblance and there is some interchangeability. Analogies usually suck, but I might say the two are as different as duck fat and duck stock.

I don't know that dark chocolate couldn't successfully be used with fish or seafood, but it would probably be used quite differently from white chocolate or cocoa butter. That I didn't find the brittle dark chocolate a compliment to the scallops is not a general condemnation of the use of even dark chocolate with seafood. Even where I've loved chocolate in meat dishes, it's been blended into the sauce or in some other way integrated into the dish. I can think of some rillettes de lièvre I had in Paris that had chocolate in the recipe, but I don't recall bits of hard chocolate. Then again, I thought some bonbons Steven Klc made with foie gras and aspic of dessert wine all coated in a thin chocolate shell were absolutely successful. Foie gras, of course, isn't seafood.

Robert Buxbaum

WorldTable

Recent WorldTable posts include: comments about reporting on Michelin stars in The NY Times, the NJ proposal to ban foie gras, Michael Ruhlman's comments in blogs about the NJ proposal and Bill Buford's New Yorker article on the Food Network.

My mailbox is full. You may contact me via worldtable.com.

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I'm really liking the PL website!

Full tilt, mucho style and content.

Liebrandt & Mason ( at least one of the guys is going to hate the next statement) are bringing back some style and flamboyance to being a chef, IMO.

Not far from a music stance, rock star ish, if you will.

With chops to back it up.

PL especially with his UK background, may realize the importance of the press, not unlike an Oasis playing around with the music weeklies like NME or the monthlies like Q magazine.

I hope Gilt does well.

Can't wait to see a menu.

2317/5000

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