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budrichard

Shad Roe

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Picked up two sets of fresh Shad Roe (difficult in the midwest) and decided to find a new recipe that avoids the typical bursting that occurs while sauteing in butter. Turned to my old faithful standby Jasper White, 'Cooking from New England'. He has two methods, first is poaching in butter, second is poaching in liquid and then quickly sauteing in butter. I decided to try the butter poaching method and added some fresh morels to accompany the roe. The method worked very well and provided a nice base for a sauce. I will try the other method next time.

Of course the real secret is to use exquisitely fresh roe and that's what we had. Simply sublime.

Any other methods of preperation anyone cares to relate? -Dick

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I ate shad roe last night for the first time at Prune in New York. I didn't like it, but feel that if so many people do, there must be something that I was missing. Could anyone give a good description of what is fabulous about the shad roe. Can anyone describe a sublime experience of eating the shad roe?


You shouldn't eat grouse and woodcock, venison, a quail and dove pate, abalone and oysters, caviar, calf sweetbreads, kidneys, liver, and ducks all during the same week with several cases of wine. That's a health tip.

Jim Harrison from "Off to the Side"

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Poached? Ack!

The beauty of shad roe is the crispy outside contrasting with the firm inside. Best preparation involves a frypan and a couple of slices of good bacon. Cook bacon in the pan, remove bacon from the pan, leave the fat in the pan. Dust the roe with a little flour and add to the pan. Cook 'til crispy on the outside. Eat garnished with bacon, and maybe a squeeze of lemon juice.

I can't imagine a soft inside and out preparation of the stuff being at all appealing.

Also, the quality of the roes is quite variable... if it gets too late in the season, they sometimes pick up a muddy flavor that isn't so nice. Don't judge all roes by a muddy example.


Edited by cdh (log)

Christopher D. Holst aka "cdh"

Learn to brew beer with my eGCI course

Chris Holst, Attorney-at-Lunch

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I've done something like cdh's prep, but threw in some cream and capers after the roe was finished, yielding a bacon-cream sauce, (just in case the roe itself isn't rich enough).

The esteemed Michel Richard served it to me with only a bit of herbed mashed potatoes and potato "tuiles." That was quite good as well.

According to this well-worth-reading piece, by Todd Kliman in the Washington City Paper, the "preparation of the season" is shad roe with grits. (Europhiles and Yankees can substitute pancetta and creamy risotto, I suppose).


I'm on the pavement

Thinking about the government.

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I'm with cdh. It's the only way to go.


I want pancakes! God, do you people understand every language except English? Yo quiero pancakes! Donnez moi pancakes! Click click bloody click pancakes!

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only way i've ever cooked it:

dust in seasoned flour, saute on both sides in clarified butter. finish in oven for about 4-5 mins. serve with capers, brown butter, lemon, and parsley

thats how we usually prepare it work (we run it as a special sometimes.) not too big on it personally.

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Every time I cook shad roe, no matter how many holes I poke it still seems to explode everywhere. Last time I swear there were as many holes as a sieve! Any tips?

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Could anyone give a good description of what is fabulous about the shad roe.

I have to say, I personally found it a bit like a gritty, slightly fishy tasting piece of chicken. The texture was nasty and the "subtlety" was lost on me.

Then again - I like caviar, but only in small doses. Can't go hog wild and eat big honking spoonfuls of it. :sad:


Katie M. Loeb
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Shad roe is kind of like escargot--an excuse to eat a lot of butter. But with shad roe you get the extra bonus of bacon!

Our recipe involves melting a couple of sticks of butter, and simmering the roe in it until it browns and just cooks through. We serve it topped with a couple of slices of bacon and boiled new potatoes on the side, drizzled with the butter. Not for the faint of heart.

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Shad roe is kind of like escargot--an excuse to eat a lot of butter.  But with shad roe you get the extra bonus of bacon! 

Our recipe involves melting a couple of sticks of butter, and simmering the roe in it until it browns and just cooks through.  We serve it topped with a couple of slices of bacon and boiled new potatoes on the side, drizzled with the butter.  Not for the faint of heart.

So shad is the "vehicle" for butter and bacon...Lovely, lovely...


Edited by Daniel (log)

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