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Kung Pow Phat Soy


jamiemaw
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But to be honest, I found the elk balls WAYYY too big. Secondly, the sauce was flatulent and the "traditional Swedish risotto" that it accompanied it didn't work for me--besides it totally lacked flavour unless you like "those kinds" of animal-like flavours.

DANIELLE

"One cannot think well, love well, sleep well, if one has not dined well."

-Virginia Woolf

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No. Not moose balls!

We haven't had moose in Sweden since the Pleistocene, and we called them giant elk, to be sure.

elk.gif

The flavours between moose balls and elk balls are decidedly different to even the most inexperienced palate.

Besides, Chef Sven Chen would loathe to have anything even marginally associated with Canada (other than hockey on the plasma -- he's a big Snepts fan) in his restaurant.

Besides, moose balls are for plebs. :hmmm: Elk balls are so succulent.

Now, off to Ikea in my Volvo...

Bjorn (Matt, lover of skiing and shooting simultaneously)

Andrew Morrison

Food Columnist | The Westender

Editor & Publisher | Scout Magazine

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(other than hockey on the plasma -- he's a big Snepts fan)

:laugh::laugh::laugh:

Any man who can work Harold Snepts into a food-related conversation is a good man in my book!

Joie Alvaro Kent

"I like rice. Rice is great if you're hungry and want 2,000 of something." ~ Mitch Hedberg

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Are you kidding? Harry Snepts and Gary Lupul made a visit to my hometown of Ornskoldsvik (100 miles north of Stockholm) and went on an elk ball binge after the collapse of '82. They were the toast of the town. When they left (to go fishing in the fiords around Narvik) they were carried to the snowmobiling station on the backs of wolves. Harold in particular was a sweet man. He taught my wife, Olganskishva, how to properly trim her moustache (hard to do when the sun is down for 3 months a year). He also showed me (i'll never forget this, so help me Thor), how to throw an elbow.

Chef Sven-Chen still talks about the time he cooked for Snepts in Shanghai, during a seniors exhibition game a few years back. He apparently stood a clear 3 feet above all the local geriatrics who came to play against his travelling team (the Bengay Tigers) and chewed on a ginseng stub for the entire 3rd period (half of which was spent in the box). Damn People's Army refs!

He endeared himself to the locals rather easily, so the story goes. I think therein lies Chef Sven-Chen's penchant for the game. Me, though I've been a hockey lover long before I served my first tray of elk balls in Canada, I still yearn for the outdoor game of my youth in Ornskoldsvik, when we used penguins for pucks and old Russian bolt-actions for sticks. We'd light bonfires of peat and eat seal meat, fresh from behind the blue line. Those were the days (and nights!), I tell you.

:huh:

Edited by editor@waiterblog (log)

Andrew Morrison

Food Columnist | The Westender

Editor & Publisher | Scout Magazine

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Where have all the penguins in Stanley Park gone? The otters? Tinned, who knew? Are they packed in water or their own juices? I just saw a news clip last night on Global about closing down the petting zoo and they wondered what they are going to do with all the animals? This is taking fusion a bit too far, I'd say. :wink:

"One chocolate truffle is more satisfying than a dozen artificially flavored dessert cakes." Darra Goldstein, Gastronomica Journal, Spring 2005 Edition

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