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An Ideal Negroni

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I made a white-ish Negroni last night with equal parts Redemption white rye, Breckenridge Bitters, and dry vermouth. Not earth shattering, but a nice variation. My wife sniffed and made "that" face, so I made her's with white rye, Campari, and Punt e Mes. She said, "yum."

 

Dan, what do you think of Breckenridge Bitters? I purchased a bottle about 6 months ago and find it a bit difficult to work with. I love i with soda, or in a sort of Americano variation, but I have had trouble subbing it in for Campari in general. I am curious to know you perspective.

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Dan, what do you think of Breckenridge Bitters? I purchased a bottle about 6 months ago and find it a bit difficult to work with. I love i with soda, or in a sort of Americano variation, but I have had trouble subbing it in for Campari in general. I am curious to know you perspective.

 

I agree. It's much closer to Suze than Campari, so that's where I'd look for inspiration. I wonder if people would contribute if we created a large number of separate "Hard to mix with" ingredient threads. With the amaro explosion of late, I have lots of bottles that needs some recipe development.

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Why not one catch-all thread? 

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I agree. It's much closer to Suze than Campari, so that's where I'd look for inspiration. I wonder if people would contribute if we created a large number of separate "Hard to mix with" ingredient threads. With the amaro explosion of late, I have lots of bottles that needs some recipe development.

 

That is good to know. I have had no experience with Suze, so I will look for recipes to try out or modify. 

 

I support the idea for hard to mix with stuff. I have a great, super bitter bottle of Pelinkovac that I can only find about half a dozen recipes for online. Might be worth people sharing their creations with theese ingredients. 

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The Ortensia with equal parts Highland Park 12, Punt e Mes, Aperol, and a (bitter) orange twist. A Negroni with scotch... and it was really good. Because Aperol is not as bitter as Campari, I think it's important to use Punt e Mes rather than any sweet vermouth in this drink.

 

14125646586_4646ecd544_z.jpg

 

In other news, Negroni week is only a few weeks away with a lot of bars participating this year.
 

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Negroni week is coming up. Not that we need a special reason to celebrate this fine creation, but it's a chance to hear about some variations on the drink.  I've had, and love, the Boulevardier and 1794.  

 

What are some other favorite spins on the negroni?

 

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The earlier thread is great for what gin, what proportions, and so on.  If you are going further afield, and looking for "vermouth, campari, liquor" drinks like the Boulevardier, my favorite is a very fancy Boulevardier.

 

2 oz Elijah Craig 12 bourbon

1 oz Campari

1 oz Cinzano sweet vermouth

Stir, strain.  Float 1 barspoon Smith and Cross, flame an nice big orange peel.  

 

(This a cheap knock-off of Chuck Taggart's Boulevard Des Reves; other variations are at the link.

 

I also suggest trying Luxardo Bitter, if you can find it, as a sub for the Campari; it's very similar but slightly cleaner on the finish (like the difference between US and Mexican coke.)


Edited by SamChevre (log)

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On a whim, I decided to throw caution to the wind (the three sheets notwithstanding), and shake  :shock:  my negroni.  I always build my Negroni in the glass.  I think I've stirred it on one or two occasions, but I wanted to see what shaking it would do.  The color was completely different.  I should have taken a photo, but it's easy enough for anyone to replicate.  The taste was actually a little different due to the aeration and immediate dilution.  It was still good and very refreshing, though.  I didn't use anything unusual it--the gin was Bombay Dry and the vermouth was Cinzano.  I will more than likely stick with building it, but it was an interesting experiment and still resulted in a pleasant drink.  I'm thinking that this style might be better suited for outdoor use.


Mike

"The mixing of whiskey, bitters, and sugar represents a turning point, as decisive for American drinking habits as the discovery of three-point perspective was for Renaissance painting." -- William Grimes

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My "Negroni" variation tonight was something that Rafa suggested for the Kinsey Report -- equal parts Smith & Cross, Bonal Gentia, and Campari. I found it a touch syrupy, so I added another equal part dry vermouth. Big, rich and lovely.


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My "Negroni" variation tonight was something that Rafa suggested for the Kinsey Report -- equal parts Smith & Cross, Bonal Gentia, and Campari.

That one is like Ron Dollete's Rope Burn, with Campari instead of Aperol.


Edited by FrogPrincesse (log)

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On a whim, I decided to throw caution to the wind (the three sheets notwithstanding), and shake  :shock:  my negroni.  I always build my Negroni in the glass.  I think I've stirred it on one or two occasions, but I wanted to see what shaking it would do.  The color was completely different.  I should have taken a photo, but it's easy enough for anyone to replicate.  The taste was actually a little different due to the aeration and immediate dilution.  It was still good and very refreshing, though.  I didn't use anything unusual it--the gin was Bombay Dry and the vermouth was Cinzano.  I will more than likely stick with building it, but it was an interesting experiment and still resulted in a pleasant drink.  I'm thinking that this style might be better suited for outdoor use.

Yeah, I throw mine to get a happy medium between the full on, punchy built version and the lighter, aerated shaken style.

That's right, throwing is not just for wanky, showy bartenders.

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Yeah, I throw mine to get a happy medium between the full on, punchy built version and the lighter, aerated shaken style.

That's right, throwing is not just for wanky, showy bartenders.

I'll have to try that.  There can never be too many excuses to try another Negroni.


Mike

"The mixing of whiskey, bitters, and sugar represents a turning point, as decisive for American drinking habits as the discovery of three-point perspective was for Renaissance painting." -- William Grimes

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I usually don't like Gran Classico Bitter in Negronis (very sweet, not bitter enough), but it worked in this one, probably because of the bitterness of the Bonal. It's also my first Negroni with mezcal and I am a fan.

 

Mezcal Negroni: Vida mezcal, Gran Classico Bitter, Bonal gentiane-quina.

 

15425847819_2bb4ac1a36_z.jpg
 

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Nom d'un chien - no Bonal, no Gran Classico, and not much hope of either appearing here.  At least we can get Mezcal, if not much of a range.

 

But yes, I think I'd like this one.


Leslie Craven, aka "lesliec"
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A Negroni made in San Diego (and a riff on Gaz Regan's Rosita) - the Jalisco Stroll by Eric Giger of Noble Experiment, with 7 Leguas tequila blanco, Campari, Dolin dry vermouth, salt solution.

I forgot to try it without the salt. With the salt it's great. the Campari is toned down enough to fully enjoy the tequila. Some chocolate in the finish.

 

16443210196_4f693e7576_z.jpg

 

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A white Negroni variation last night, also found through Gaz Regan's 101 Best New Cocktails app.

Tthe Citrine (Jake Sutton) with Sipsmith London dry gin, Suze, Dolin/Vya sweet vermouth (Cocchi vermouth di Torino), stir/strain/up (rock), lemon twist.

 

I love the Sipsmith gin (very crisp/bright flavors), and the VdT paired really well with the Suze. Very happy.

 

16378700888_21d5c6a4f9_z.jpg

 

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Another tequila-based Negroni variation, the Negrita (Giuseppe Gallo via Gaz Regan), with tequila Ocho plata (7 Leguas tequila blanco), Campari, Barolo Chinato. The dried fruit/raisins and general depth in the Barolo Chinato are a nice contrast to the fresh and crisp tequila.

 

16663691626_8c6e67c169_z.jpg


Edited by FrogPrincesse (log)

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This being my favorite cocktail, I've been experimenting lately. I'm loving the classic proportions with Plymouth Gin and Cocci di Torino. Stirred vigorously and strained into a glass with fresh, big ice cubes. They melt slowly enough that it's still satisfying at the end, but even in the beginning it's not quite the punch in the face of groni served up.

 

My girlfriend, a bit tired of being knocked completely off her feet, has asked for a "girly" version. A regular negroni diluted 1:3 with soda, served on a lot of ice, is refreshing and delicious. On a hot day I might even prefer the girlygroni.

 

N.B.: I'd previously been using whatever gin was lying around, and M&R vermouth. The latter, I've come to realize, is disgusting. I've found a lot of debate online about this. There may be something in it that freaks out the taste buds of certain people. Some knowledgeable cocktail folks seem to like it but mine is going down the drain.


Notes from the underbelly

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N.B.: I'd previously been using whatever gin was lying around, and M&R vermouth. The latter, I've come to realize, is disgusting. I've found a lot of debate online about this. There may be something in it that freaks out the taste buds of certain people. Some knowledgeable cocktail folks seem to like it but mine is going down the drain.

I find this issue quite fascinating. I've gone back and forth between M&R and Cinzano for years, and enjoy both. I wonder if bottle age has something to do with it - not how long the bottle has sat open in your fridge (or on your bar), which everyone knows causes it to deteriorate, but how long it's been sitting on the shelf, and under what conditions. Because M&R and Cinzano are the only two sweet vermouth options in my local liquor monopoly (at least most of the time), I know they have pretty decent turnover. Obviously I'm just guessing here, though; it could be that you (and others) just don't like it.


Matthew Kayahara

Kayahara.ca

@mtkayahara

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Mine was brand new from the store around the corner (admittedly it may have been on their shelf forever). I haven't had Cinzano. One of the M&R haters in a cocktail forum suggested that Cinzano had a similar flavor profile and yet he found it inoffensive. The cocci tastes nothing like M&R—darker, less sweet, some bitterness, orange peel and spices.

 

The flavors I get from M&R are like sweet bathwater and imitation oregano. This is drinking it straight. In a negroni the campari is powerful enough that I don't find the M&R terrible. But I also don't find the overall effect magical.

 

Edited to add: I'd be curious to hear a description of the flavors of M&R from some of the people who like it. Is this one of those cilantro-like things where we're tasting something completely different?


Edited by paulraphael (log)

Notes from the underbelly

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I haven't tried the Cocchi VdT, but I was relatively unimpressed with Dolin's sweet vermouth, which I found thin and insipid. Next time I open a bottle of M&R, I'll do notes. From memory, it certainly isn't appreciably bitter, but in my book, that's why amari exist.


Matthew Kayahara

Kayahara.ca

@mtkayahara

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Cocchi VdT is delicious, but by far I prefer Punt e Mes in a Negroni. I like the Cocchi with a squeeze of lemon and if I'm trying to stretch it, a bit of seltzer.


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I haven't tried Punt e Mes in a negroni. I've heard others talk about it. I'm surprised it works, since it seems like it's well on the road to being a bitter just like the campari. You find it balanced?


Notes from the underbelly

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