Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Sign in to follow this  
Monica Bhide

Indian Breads Class on eGCI

Recommended Posts

Peshwari naan please. Since what I get is filled with a range of ingredients I'd like to know a range of acceptable ingredients.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Stevie -- welcome to eGullet.. I will certainly include that in the class. Other breads you would like to know about. looking forward to more posts from you :smile:


Monica Bhide

A Life of Spice

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Onion Kulcha is my go to bread when I am at a restaurant that serves it.


Bill Russell

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Roomali Roti? Or is that too ambitious for the home cook?

Might be hard -- I am not sure I know anyone here who makes these -- let me poke around and see what I can find


Monica Bhide

A Life of Spice

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'll second the request for dosas - I have found few recipes, but would really like to make them at home.


Kathy

Cooking is like love. It should be entered into with abandon or not at all. - Harriet Van Horne

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As always, I'm a fervent advocate of south Indian breads. Its not just because they are lesser known compared to the north Indian ones, as because some of them are really outstandingly delicious.

So apart from the dosas, iddlies, appams that most people are familiar with, why not go for flaky Kerala parottas, or ultra-delicate pathiri, or spongy starfish shaped ney-patal, or light steamed neer dosas, or thick and hearty adais, or thick tasty puri-like Konkani vades, or healthy mung-dal pancakes (pudla), or hard crisp thalipith which a food writer friend from the Asian Wall Street Journal dubbed one of the best new things he'd eaten in Asia?

Some of these, I think, like pathiri and parottas are really quite difficult to make since a lot of the secret is in the technique which only comes with practice. But others like pudlas and thalipith and adais should be easier,

Vikram

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
As always, I'm a fervent advocate of south Indian breads. Its not just because they are lesser known compared to the north Indian ones, as because some of them are really outstandingly delicious.

So apart from the dosas, iddlies, appams that most people are familiar with, why not go for flaky Kerala parottas, or ultra-delicate pathiri, or spongy starfish shaped ney-patal, or light steamed neer dosas, or thick and hearty adais, or thick tasty puri-like Konkani vades, or healthy mung-dal pancakes (pudla), or hard crisp thalipith which a food writer friend from the Asian Wall Street Journal dubbed one of the best new things he'd eaten in Asia?

Some of these, I think, like pathiri and parottas are really quite difficult to make since a lot of the secret is in the technique which only comes with practice. But others like pudlas and thalipith and adais should be easier,

Vikram

Great suggestions Vikram. I guess it would be a great way for eGullet to show it really can make a difference in the world of cooking classes. Whilst these breads are not difficult to prepare, they do take practice and I can well imagine the teaming of Monica and Bhasin, with the trained eye of a photographer to find it easy in sharing the process of exploring these lesser known breads easily and successfully.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'd like to see ones that can actually be done well by home cooks, without needing extra equipment - e.g ones that can be cooked on a griddle, rather than in a tandoori oven.


I love animals.

They are delicious.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I'd like to see ones that can actually be done well by home cooks, without needing extra equipment - e.g ones that can be cooked on a griddle, rather than in a tandoori oven.

Good call. The breads Vikram suggests, can be made at home.

And without much need for specialized equipment.

Parathas, chapatis, rotis, pooris, bhaturas, cheelas, dosas, uthappams, adai etc can all be made at home and with great ease.

In fact, it would do some restaurant chefs well to get trained in preparing home style breads, and especially the unknown Southern Indian ones. They are really wonderful breads that are yet largely unknown outside of Southern India... or Southern Indian homes around India. If each chef in a restaurant can master one such bread each year, they would hardly need to worry about fusing any foreign elements into their repertoire. These breads alone could open up their culinary horizons onto something wonderfully different without great ceremony or fuss.

I am looking forward to learning in this class. I am delighted that Vikram thought of these breads. We can all now learn about them in greater detail through EGCI.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

After reading this discussion, I am going back to a thought I had of doing a two part series of this class -- North Indian Breads and South Indian Breads...

Vikram -- some of the south Indian ones, as you clearly indicate, might be harder for the home cook. Although i would really like to do one on appams.

Okay -- back to the drawing board. Please keep these suggestions coming. they are very helpful


Monica Bhide

A Life of Spice

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
After reading this discussion, I am going back to a thought I had of doing a two part series of this class -- North Indian Breads and South Indian Breads...

Vikram -- some of the south Indian ones, as you clearly indicate, might be harder for the home cook. Although i would really like to do one on appams.

Okay -- back to the drawing board. Please keep these suggestions coming. they are very helpful

Monica, that sounds wonderful.

I would not worry about the hard factor of what you want to teach. Teach us.. .and with BBhasin and you together, I am sure we will get all the technical details and all the technique factors well explained and that is what makes bread making become an easy task.

It would be wonderful if you could share with us here breads such as the ones Vikram suggests. How wonderful to have EGCI be one of the first places on the internet exploring these breads.

As you head back to the drawing board, do consider revising the plan some.... what is detailed in technique, is not always hard. I am sure you can demystify whatever makes these breads hard. Give us and those breads a chance. Please. Appams are the easier one.... and many can make them without having to take a class.. lets learn about the flaky Kerala parottas, the ultra-delicate pathiris, the starfish shaped ney-patal, the steamed neer dosas, the thick and hearty adais, Konkani vades, or healthy mung-dal pancakes (pudla), and the hard crisp thalipith. This would be most amazing and will give EGCI a great edge over any other such teaching program. To my knowledge, there have not been many courses offered on these breads.

Thanks for making the effort to share the technique behind these breads. I thank you in anticipation of learning from the two of you everything there is to know about making these home style breads at home and without much drama. :smile:

I have emailed some students of mine to come become members and join in this class. The prospect of having you all teach us about these lesser known breads, will only make those already familiar with so many of the more commonly known breads find eGullet even more of a wonderful discovery.

The two part series is a perfect way of handling this. You could even do one on the familiar easier breads. And the other could be on the lesser know breads.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Suvir - thanks for the note. Bhasin and I will be doing the North Indian breads. I am going to try to work with a very talented Chef from Kerala to do the SOuth Indian breads. Ofcourse with all your talent, you could easily teach any of these with much ease


Edited by Monica Bhide (log)

Monica Bhide

A Life of Spice

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Suvir - thanks for the note. Bhasin and I will be doing the North Indian breads. I am going to work with a very talented Chef from Kerala to do the SOuth Indian breads. Ofcourse with all your talent, you could easily teach any of these with much ease

Monica, I am a student for this one.

And I am a student even as I teach.

One learns daily. From diners at the restaurant and from published authors such as yourself.

Talent really comes in being open to learning and I would certainly gain far more than I would in teaching myself.

Hence my greed for learning from you and this very talented chef from Kerala.

I am sure together the three of you will make these classes very memorable and my talents will pale in comparison. Though comparisons are not necessary.

Also, even as a mere member, I wish eGullet well, and hence would want a class on eGullet to be more than just a thread to be documented. Vikrams suggestions will make the class you teach with these very talented two people, become quickly something unique and wonderful. Dosai, Appams, Utthapams, Nans, Parathas, Pooris and Rotis are all familiar and relatively easy for they are so mainstream.

I would rather showcase EGCI and eGullet by highlighting the novelty of a class such as the one on the hard to find Southern Indian breads.

I am sure with your own talents, and that of your two very talented mates, you will not be short of whatever it takes to demystify what you think is hard.

And certainly, with encouraging words from you and those I meet, even as I learn each day, I do my bit of sharing. Through food cooked and served at the restaurant and classes I teach.

I never had talent for making these breads, I had great teachers. Not unlike yourself. They taught me by unfurling the intricacies involved (which in the case of these bread classes, should be largely easy, for you can do so with cameras and video if you so plan) and encouraged me to practice and not get upset by my failures. I travel a lot around India and mostly to work with mothers, in kitchens where they make dishes one would hardly every find in restaurants. The generosity of these women, keeps the likes of me learning forever and realizing how little we really know. It is these mothers I learn from that I consider talented and smart. I only learn from them, and hope someday I will find myself doing the same.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Hi All, I am working with BBHasin on a class for eGCI teaching Indian breads.  ANy favorites that you would like to learn about?

Looking forward for these classes as it seems it is getting very interesting even before it's started.

When are these classes starting? How about SHEERMAL ? :cool:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sheermal is by far one of my most favorite breads. We are in the process of now designing the class. My estimate is that it should be compeleted and online in a few weeks


Monica Bhide

A Life of Spice

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Dear Friends,

Hello,

Have been reading eGullet for a few days and find it very interesting. This is my first post. I dont know if anyone has heard about this or not. It is called "Doli ki Roti". It is a deep fried thick bread made from a very fermented dough. Usually it is stuffed with chana dal, onions, paneer etc, but one can make it plain also. Best done during the summer time as fermentation is good.

It is a considered to be a unique and classic bread from Multan region (now in Pak). My parents hailed form there and back in Delhi where I grew up, we used to go to a place called Multani Dhanda, near Pahar Gunj and get the starter dough and then used to make that bread that same day.

It is to die for...

May be you would like to include that in the class.

Also, how are the classes conducted??

regards,

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Welcome to eGullet. Great to have you post here and share this bread with us.

Do you have a recipe? Are you based in India or elsewhere?

I had grand-aunts that hailed from Multan and some cousins too. And yes it is most tasty... never made it or even saw it being made. :sad:

Would love to know more about it. I have had it with chana dal.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Dear Friends,

Hello,

Have been reading eGullet for a few days and find it very interesting. This is my first post. I dont know if anyone has heard about this or not. It is called "Doli ki Roti". It is a deep fried thick bread made from a very fermented dough. Usually it is stuffed with chana dal, onions, paneer etc, but one can make it plain also. Best done during the summer time as fermentation is good.

It is a considered to be a unique and classic bread from Multan region (now in Pak). My parents hailed form there and back in Delhi where I grew up, we used to go to a place called Multani Dhanda, near Pahar Gunj and get the starter dough and then used to make that bread that same day.

It is to die for...

May be you would like to include that in the class.

Also, how are the classes conducted??

regards,

Both sides of my parents families are from Multan and they still make the best Doli Ki Roti ever. Multani Dhanda is still a very interesting place. We used to frequent it for moong dal chawal with the Khatta masala. What sweet memories!

Nice of you to post. Welcome to eGullet. If you have a recipe, do post it here. Also tell us a bit about yourself -- it is always fascinating to read about eGulleeters

To see how the classes are being held -- go to this thread here: eGCI

We are beginning the Indian classes next week with a very simple menu for Diwali, sort of Indian food 101 recipes if you will.


Monica Bhide

A Life of Spice

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am based in Herndon, VA and regarding the recipe... I'll have to check on that. I am sure that my wife has it somewhere. We actually made it last year. Created the starter material from scratch. My mother was visiting and she said that it tastes the same (seal of approval)

I think we have one ball of dough still in the freezer and we are gonna try to create more dough one of these days. Will let you know when I do that.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I am based in Herndon, VA and regarding the recipe... I'll have to check on that. I am sure that my wife has it somewhere. We actually made it last year. Created the starter material from scratch. My mother was visiting and she said that it tastes the same (seal of approval)

I think we have one ball of dough still in the freezer and we are gonna try to create more dough one of these days. Will let you know when I do that.

Well in that case we are neighbours! Welcome and do take some pics when you prepare this -- would love to see it being made -- ofcourse would love even more to taste it :wink:


Monica Bhide

A Life of Spice

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Monica, thank you for doing a class on this!

The Doli ki Roti deliad (welcome to egullet :smile: ) describes sounds wonderful.

I'd say I'm looking for any instruction/tips I can get for naan, but, as someone mentioned earlier, perhaps emphasis on breads that can be made without a tandoori? I can beg for naan tips another day - I'm content for it to be a challenge that keeps me busy for a long time anyway. :biggrin:

I'd hoped someone would do a class on indian breads ever since the thread on them.


". . . if waters are still, then they can't run at all, deep or shallow."

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sign in to follow this  

  • Similar Content

    • By Bhukhhad
      Breakfast in India vs Breakfast in our homes outside India
      My breakfasts have varied from the time I started to cook for myself instead of just enjoying my Mother’s cooking. At first they were a mix-match of meal fixings, or just dinner leftovers. Or the good old breakfast cereal and milk. But as the years passed and I was more organized, the meals I enjoyed in my Mother’s home began to swim in my memories. And I began to prepare those for my family. However, I am no amazonian chef, so depending on  the hectic nature of the days plans, I switched back and forth from convenience with taste, to elaborate and of course tasty breakfasts. We do have both vegetarian and non vegetarian foods but Indian breakfasts will mostly be vegetarian. 
      So here are some of the things I might make: 
       
      1. Poha as in mostly ‘kande pohe’.
      2. Cheela/ Pudla
      3. Masala toast
      4. Indian Omelette
      5. Handwo piece
      6. Thepla
      7. Vaghareli rotli
      8. Dhokla chutney
      9. Idli sambhar
      10. Leftover sabji
      11. Muthiya
      12. Khakhra
      13. Upma
      14. Paratha
       
      1. Kande Pohe: 
      The dish derives its name from Maharashtra where the Kande Pohe are celebrated as breakfast. They can of course like any breakfast, be eaten at any time. 
      Pohe/ Poha are steamed rice grains that have been beaten flat and then again redried. So they are like Rice flakes. Except they are hand pounded, so have a knobbly texture. 
      You get several varieties in the market. I prefer the thick white variety. 
       
      1 cup dry poha per person
      1 medium onion sliced
      1/2 jalapeno deseeded
      1 sprig curry leaves
      2 small garlic cloves
      1/4 t cumin seeds
      1/2 lemon 
      1/8 t asafoetida
      1/4 t turmeric
      small handful of cilantro leaves
      1T fresh grated coconut
      2 T Peanut oil 
      salt to taste
      sugar to taste
       
      In a pan heat some oil and add cumin seeds. When the seeds sputter, add sliced onions and stir. Saute on medium heat till they turn slightly browned here and there. Do not burn the onions. 
      Meanwhile wash the Poha in a colander and drain. Do this two or three times to get rid of any dirt and also to allow them to rehydrate. They do not need soaking. Fluff the poha with a fork. Add salt sugar turmeric asafoetida and chopped cilantro. Mix and set aside. 
      Once the onions are ready add minced garlic and chopped jalapeno along with the curry leaf sprig. 
      Turn the heat to low and add the poha mixture. Stir to coat and to allow the turmeric and asafoetida to cook. The poha will turn mildly yellow and start giving a wonderful fragrance. 
      Turn off the heat. Fluff gently and plate. Garnish with fresh grated coconut and a squeeze of lemon juice. 
      Finger licking good!! 
      Now when I make this next I will post a picture. 
      Update: Ok I felt the urge to have Kande Pohe for tonight’s dinner. So here is a picture. I am certain to enjoy it for breakfast as well. The measurement of 1 cup poha per person is too much for one meal. But carried over to another meal thats super good! I will also have some stir fried bok choy greens made in the same kadhai after the poha was done, and some cooked and sliced beetroot for salad. My family will add some haldiram sev on the poha for extra crunch! And we will all have some chaas to round off this meal. 
      *************
       
      2. Cheela/ Pudla
       
      These are essentially crepes but in the Indian style. 
      1/2 cup sieved garbanzo bean (Besan) flour. 
      Water to form a thin batter
      1T plain yogurt 
      1/2 t ginger garlic paste 
      1/4 or less green chili crushed
      2 t heated oil *
      pinch asafoetida
      pinch turmeric 
      salt to taste
      chopped cilantro (two sprigs)
      some ‘masala’ from a readymade pickle
       
       
      Method:
       
      mix the ingredients together except oil. Heat oil in a separate pan and add about 1 to 2 t of the hot oil onto the batter. It will sizzle. Use a whisk to stir thoroughly. The batter should be pouring consistency. 
      Let the batter soak for about half an hour if possible. 
      On a hot griddle, pour a ladle full of the batter. Turn the griddle with your wrist to spread the batter around. Cook on moderate to high flame. Flip the crepe when all the sides look like they are ready. You can add a little oil to the sides of the frying pan to make the edges crispy. 
       
      In my home we usually have a Besan cheela with some yogurt its a quick and filling breakfast. You can have a small salad or fruit with it to make it more complete. Or fill the center of the cheela with some cottage cheese and fold for added creaminess! 
      ****************
      3. Masala Toast : 
       
      1 slice of bread (your choice) toasted
      1/2 small red onion minced
      1 medium roma tomato diced (or whatever you have)
      cilantro (few leaves)
      1/8 t cumin (optional)
      1/4 t chaat masala ( available in stores)
      1 inch cube paneer
      1 T peanut oil
      pinch turmeric (optional)
       
      Heat the oil in a pan and saute the onions. Add the tomato and cook down to mush. Crumble the paneer and add the dry spices. Stir for a few seconds to warm the paneer. Add the cilantro and though I have not written it as an ingredient, I like a few drops of lemon juice. Do not overcook paneer.
      I started this topic because someone asked for Indian recipes on the new forum. I don’t think they have seen any yet. I hope they find this useful. I am enjoying it. 
      **************************
       
      I will add recipes to the list slowly. I have to however add that after a certain ‘age’ I have now resorted to having to make sure I have three things for breakfast besides coffee: a glass of water, a small portion of fruit and a small portion of some protein not necessarily meat. 
      Bhukkhad
       

    • By Pastrypastmidnight
      So I tried my hand at croissants for the first time in about 5 years. I used the recipe from the Bouchon Bakery cookbook. Despite the fact that I really struggled rolling them out (the dough was very stiff and resisted rolling), tore the dough layer in small patches quite a bit on the last turn, and probably took too long letting the butter get too warm, I got nice layers on the outside and on the interior and they did shatter nicely on the outside. I did not get that beautiful open honeycomb interior, however. 
       
      I’d love any tips or feedback or advice anyone could offer to do better next time—thanks!
       

    • By curls
      So, what is everyone doing for the pastry & baking side of Easter?
       
      I'm working on the following chocolates: fruit & nut eggs, hollow bunnies, Jelly Belly filled bunnies, coconut bunnies, dragons (filled with rice krispies & chocolate), peanut butter hedgehogs, and malted milk hens. Hoping to finish my dark chocolate production today and get started on all my milk chocolate items.
       
      My father-in-law will be baking the traditional family Easter bread a day or two before Easter. Its an enriched bread and he makes two versions -- one with raisins and one without (I prefer the one with raisins).
       

       
      And I was lucky enough to spot this couple in the sale moulds stock at last year's eGullet chocolate & confections workshop in Niagara-on-the-Lake, Ontario. These love bunnies help so very much with Easter chocolate production!  ;-)

    • By Rene_lorraine
      I'm a pastry cook working in NYC. We have a seasonal bread that we do with chickpeas, garlic (fresh and confit) and pecorino. We drain and rinse the chickpeas and it was working for a while but it hasn't been consistent. Bread turns out flat. What is it in chickpeas that kills the yeast and how can we counteract the effect? I'm taking a long shot by posting but wanted to further educate myself and fellow team members. Thanks so much. 
    • By Deeps
      This is one of my daughter favorite dishes, being mild and less spicy she loves this rice dish.  Its super easy to make and goes well with most Indian curries.
      Do try this out and I am sure you will be happy with the results.
       

       
      Prep Time : 5 mins
      Cook Time: 5 mins
      Serves: 2
       
      Ingredients:
      1 cup rice(basmati), cooked
      1/2 cup coconut, shredded or grated
      1 green chili, slit
      1 dried red chili
      1 1/2 tablespoon oil/ghee(clarified butter)
      1/2 teaspoon mustard seeds
      1/2 teaspoon cumin seeds
      1/2 tablespoon chana dal(split chickpeas)
      1/2 tablespoon urad dal(split black gram)
      1 teaspoon ginger, finely chopped
      A pinch of hing (asafoetida)
      Few curry leaves
      Salt to taste
       
      Directions
      1) Heat oil/ghee(clarified butter) in a pan in medium flame. I used coconut oil here because it tastes best for this dish.
      2) Add mustard seeds, cumin seeds, chana dal(split chickpeas), urad dal(split black gram), green chili, dried red chili, ginger and curry leaves. Fry this for 30 seconds in medium flame. The trick is to ensure that these are fried but not burned.
      3) Add a pinch of hing(asafoetida) and mix well.
      4) Now add the cooked rice and coconut. Stir well for about 15 to 20 seconds and switch off the flame.
      5) Finally add salt into this and mix well. You could add peanuts or cashew nuts if you prefer. Goes well with most curries.
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...