Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

The Mint Julep


donk79
 Share

Recommended Posts

I believe that Death & Co. currently has a tequila julep on the menu. Two kinds of tequila (can't remember which two) with a Del Maguey Chichicapa float.

"I'll put anything in my mouth twice." -- Ulterior Epicure
Link to comment
Share on other sites

The problem with this is that it seems, in theory at least, to be such a good idea. Except in practice it just doesn't work that way. I was in a Mojito competition a while back and was thrilled that my friend (a former sous chef I'd worked with before) who now runs and herb and flower stand, was at my local farmer's market with absolutely drop dead gorgeous Pineapple mint. He brought me a big bunch just before the competition. And for as aesthetically beautiful and gorgeously scented that mint was, once it was muddled it tasted like the clippings out of a lawn mower bag. I'm convinced it's one of the reasons I did so poorly at that competition.

I have to agree with Sam. Spearmint is the way to go. Thai Basil is lovely in cocktails, and something I use with frequency, but not in a Julep. It does make for a nice variant of a Gin-gin Mule, however.

Perhaps, using spearmint as usual in the drink and garnishing with a big, spanked bunch of a different kind or different herb would be the way to go. Seems to me the julep is more about the smell anyway. Don't forget to trim the straw so the drinker has to get their nose right down in the garnish.

It's almost never bad to feed someone.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It's also true that mint barely needs to be bruised. "Muddling" is perhaps too strong a word for it. Gently pressed is better. Or even simply left to briefly soak in the spirit. I didn't always understand this, but a good experiment is to make something like a Martini and stir a single mint leaf (un-pressed, muddled or bruised) together with the spirits. The resulting drink will have plenty of mint flavor. When one is making a drink with a fair amount of mint in it, such as a Julep, the only point of gently pressing the mint is to make sure that it fully contacts all the booze and gives up its oils. Muddlng almost always creates vegetal flavors.

--

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 9 months later...

Derby Day 2011 is almost here. Anyone have any new twists on the Mint Julep? Did you ever buy the silver julep cups you lusted over (I haven't done that yet). What kind of Bourbon are you using this year? I'm looking for suggestions! I will need to have drink in hand at the call to the post.

Jeff Meeker, aka "jsmeeker"

Link to comment
Share on other sites

How about this one from the Beta Cocktails thread?

No Mint Bittered Cynar Julep

by Chris Amirault, eGullet

1 1/2 oz Rum, Matusalem Classico

1 oz Cynar

1/2 oz Branca Menta

1/2 oz Demerara Syrup (scant)

1 ds Angostura bitters

1 sli Lime (end slice, squeezed, turned inside out)

Stir with ice and strain over fresh ice. Squeeze lime slice over drink -- like it's a twist, not a wedge, with skin out -- and drop it in.

Very challenging drink to be savored. The original would be too sweet for me. Added 1/4 oz lemon and omitted the syrup.

Edited by EvergreenDan (log)

Kindred Cocktails | Craft + Collect + Concoct + Categorize + Community

Link to comment
Share on other sites

is there any real benefit to steeping the mint in the bourbon in advance? I could see how it could be an advantage if you needed to make a lot of them really quickly.. But I won't be doing that. Just making one or two for myself.

Jeff Meeker, aka "jsmeeker"

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 year later...

To my mind, the more interesting direction to go if one would like to branch out in the Julep category is to step away from the hegemony of bourbon and explore other base spirits. The Prescription Julep is always a winner, especially if you can get Louis Royer Force 53 (106 proof cognac). I have made and enjoyed Juleps with aged rum, tequila, London dry gin, Old Tom gin, and one of my favorites is a Julep with genever.

Fully agree. I made myself a mini Prescription Julep last night and the combination of cognac and rye is great, smooth entry with a lot of spice from the rye, rich and delicious. I had something similar at the Varnish but now that I check my notes I see that it was actually a cognac + dark rum combo that they call a Thomas Mint Julep and that they top with powdered sugar. Also excellent.

8557883977_8d873a0624_z.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Here is the Thomas Mint Julep that they serve at the Varnish made with Pierre Ferrand 1840 cognac and Smith and Cross Jamaican rum.

8569800763_3fd80578d0_z.jpg

Recipe as shared by Chris Bostik on Thirsty in LA

Thomas Mint Julep
Ingredients:

  • 2oz Cognac
  • .25oz Jamaican Rum
  • .25oz simple
  • Sugar cube
  • 7-9 mint leaves
  • Powdered sugar

Start by adding mint and sugar cube. Add the simple and gently press leaves to release oils in mint. DO NOT MUDDLE MINT!!! Next add crushed ice and lightly swizzle. Top off and cap w/ crushed ice. You want a nice little dome here. Drizzle rum over top of julep. Garnish w/ generous mint bouquet. Make sure to wake it up by lightly slapping it to release oils. Sprinkle powdered sugar on top.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 year later...

There is currently a heatwave in San Diego, so I made myself a Mint Julep last night. I went with Buffalo Trace bourbon, a barspoon of simple syrup, mint from the garden, Orinoco bitters (2 dashes), and the David Embury Julep No. 1 method of preparation.

 

14071885144_2495a67004_z.jpg
 

The bitters are intensely flavored and their cardamom notes were great with the mint. Based on taste, I would have misidentified it as a rye-based Julep because it was very spicy and green/floral. The bitters transformed the drink and gave it a long complex finish. I was wondering what would happen if I tried this with a rye (I was thinking the High West Double Rye).

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I love those bitters. I'm glad they're (inter?)nationally available now. 

DrunkLab.tumblr.com

”In Demerara some of the rum producers have a unique custom of placing chunks of raw meat in the casks to assist in aging, to absorb certain impurities, and to add a certain distinctive character.” -Peter Valaer, "Foreign and Domestic Rum," 1937

Link to comment
Share on other sites

As a substitute for Angostura, in any drink with some amount of dark rum, in various Old Fashioneds with different spirits, and in drinks with orgeat (Army & Navy, Japanese, Cameron's Kick). Also, of course, in The Dead Rabbit's own drinks. Honestly I haven't played around with them too much myself so I'm open to suggestions. I love the idea of turning bourbon into rye with a few healthy dashes. 

  • Like 2

DrunkLab.tumblr.com

”In Demerara some of the rum producers have a unique custom of placing chunks of raw meat in the casks to assist in aging, to absorb certain impurities, and to add a certain distinctive character.” -Peter Valaer, "Foreign and Domestic Rum," 1937

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You can probably get away with using another light whisk(e)y in some of those drinks, or a peated Scotch in the ones that call for Connemara. 

DrunkLab.tumblr.com

”In Demerara some of the rum producers have a unique custom of placing chunks of raw meat in the casks to assist in aging, to absorb certain impurities, and to add a certain distinctive character.” -Peter Valaer, "Foreign and Domestic Rum," 1937

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Punch has a nice article on the Julep, as well as some good recipes for contemporary spins. 

DrunkLab.tumblr.com

”In Demerara some of the rum producers have a unique custom of placing chunks of raw meat in the casks to assist in aging, to absorb certain impurities, and to add a certain distinctive character.” -Peter Valaer, "Foreign and Domestic Rum," 1937

Link to comment
Share on other sites

There is currently a heatwave in San Diego, so I made myself a Mint Julep last night. I went with Buffalo Trace bourbon, a barspoon of simple syrup, mint from the garden, Orinoco bitters (2 dashes), and the David Embury Julep No. 1 method of preparation.

 

14071885144_2495a67004_z.jpg

 

The bitters are intensely flavored and their cardamom notes were great with the mint. Based on taste, I would have misidentified it as a rye-based Julep because it was very spicy and green/floral. The bitters transformed the drink and gave it a long complex finish. I was wondering what would happen if I tried this with a rye (I was thinking the High West Double Rye).

 

1. That looks awesome in every way. Your mint looks phenomenal!

 

2. Where does one acquire these bitters?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Why not wait a few weeks and acquire them at the Rabbit?  :wink:

  • Like 1

DrunkLab.tumblr.com

”In Demerara some of the rum producers have a unique custom of placing chunks of raw meat in the casks to assist in aging, to absorb certain impurities, and to add a certain distinctive character.” -Peter Valaer, "Foreign and Domestic Rum," 1937

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 months later...

There is currently a heatwave in San Diego, so I made myself a Mint Julep last night. I went with Buffalo Trace bourbon, a barspoon of simple syrup, mint from the garden, Orinoco bitters (2 dashes), and the David Embury Julep No. 1 method of preparation.

 

14071885144_2495a67004_z.jpg

 

The bitters are intensely flavored and their cardamom notes were great with the mint. Based on taste, I would have misidentified it as a rye-based Julep because it was very spicy and green/floral. The bitters transformed the drink and gave it a long complex finish. I was wondering what would happen if I tried this with a rye (I was thinking the High West Double Rye).

 

So I also made one with the Double Rye and the Orinoco bitters a few days later and it was great of course.

 

14626807104_956b8ce3b3_z.jpg

 

 

Last night I decided to use the mint that has been flourishing on my patio for another Julep.  I went with Natasha David's Torino Julep. No whiskey in this one, but a mix of sweet vermouth (I used Punt e Mes), Smith & Cross, and Fernet-Branca, with a pinch of salt to temper the bitterness. I reduced the Demerara syrup to 1/4 oz, which was plenty already (I think it could be skipped altogether).  

 

Very good. The only critic is that it is very lightweight for a julep, so it's no longer a sipper.

 

14623006484_6d79472737_z.jpg

 

Doing some reading afterwards I found this article from Time Magazine that has a lot of good Julep ideas, including one with Fernet snow that has potential.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

You get an excellent frost on your julep cups. 

DrunkLab.tumblr.com

”In Demerara some of the rum producers have a unique custom of placing chunks of raw meat in the casks to assist in aging, to absorb certain impurities, and to add a certain distinctive character.” -Peter Valaer, "Foreign and Domestic Rum," 1937

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...