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Winnipeg Restaurants


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My wife and I are visiting family in Winnipeg for a week in January. We love to dine but we have been somewhat dissapointed in past with the upper level restaurants in this city.

Fusion Grill was good in spite of the grumpy owner. We had wonderful sushi at Wasabi but the prices were very high. (I understand you have to pay for good fresh seafood in the prairies.) Average to poor quality at The Inn in the Park (I think it's called), La Vilelle Gare, The Loop (terrible), and most establishments on Corydon. That's about it as far as previous visits.

Anyone?

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How about "529 Wellington", in case you haven't heard of it. They have probably the best wine list in Winnipeg, about 500 different wines. It's mostly a high-end steak house, but they serve seafood as well, and their quality is very consistent.

"I hate people who are not serious about their meals." Oscar Wilde

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I haven't been in Winnipeg since last summer, but assuming no changes: Pineridge Hollow, just out of town, is quite good if you go for dinner and give Chef Alex some notice that you want a serious meal (they also cater a lot of lowest-common-denominator customers with grilled-cheese sandwiches and the like). Edohei is a surprisingly good sushi restaurant -- sit at the sushi bar and have the owner deal with you. The Velvet Glove, which is in the Fairmont (where by the way the club-floor staff is one of the best in the hotel industry), is also good. There's a roundup of most of the places I visited in Winnipeg here (the Winnipeg material is in the second half of the article).

Steven A. Shaw aka "Fat Guy"
Co-founder, Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, sshaw@egstaff.org
Proud signatory to the eG Ethics code
Director, New Media Studies, International Culinary Center (take my food-blogging course)

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There are much better restaurants in Winnipeg than the ones you visited. Unfortunately (or perhaps fortunately) most are sheap to moderately-priced rather than "upper-level." Of moderately to upper-level restaurants, some suggestions include:

Tre Visi--fabulous Italian food in the Exchange District. Their carpaccio is a rare find in the Prairies.

Amici's and Bombolini's--Amici's is the more expensive of the two, though the food from both comes from the same kitchen. I much prefer the menu at Amici's. I've had some disappointments with menu choices at Bombolini's, but everything I've tried from Amici's has been excellent. If I could choose just one Italian restaurant, however, it would be Tre Visi. Their gnocchi outclasses any others in Winnipeg (Bombolini's were heavy and were as large as rocks).

Dubrovnik's--I've never eaten there but have had food prepared by the chef. His osso bucco is tender and flavourful. During the early '90s, the quality of the food suffered as the current (and original) chef left for a period of time. He has since returned and as I understand it, he has brought the menu back to its former glory. But as I said, I have never eaten there so I cannot personally vouch for the menu.

Bistro Dansk--Danish and Bohemian food (strange combo, but it works!). Wonderful schnitzel, excellent roasted potatoes, and the most amazing hazelnut pie I have ever eaten. Their homemade liver pate is also a treat. Sometimes the hazelnut pie is a tad overbaked, but it is always delicious. I would stay away from their puff pastry (really a giant cream puff)--it's delicious, but they overdo it with the chocolate sauce. Competely ruins it, imo.

Edohei--far better sushi than Wasabi. Chef Ono is a real sushi chef, unlike those working at other establishments, and the attraction at Edohei is the food rather than the schmoozy, pretentious atmosphere. I generally stay away from sushi in Winnipeg, however, since frozen fish (and pretty much all the sushi in Winnipeg is from frozen fish) makes poor sushi, but Chef Ono does a pretty good job with what he can get. For lunch, his donburis are the best in the city.

Velvet Glove--I haven't eaten there in years but it was good then. I don't know if I would have raved about it but I have heard some good things about it recently.

I haven't eaten at 529 Wellington but I think for the money, you can get far better quality beef and cook it yourself. I tend to think of it as being more for those who are interested in restaurants rather than food.

For cheaper eats, Winnipeg really shines with 'ethnic' foods. For example:

Massawa--for Ethiopian food. Service is mediocre to bad at times, but the food is quite good. I haven't been there in some time, though, so that may have changed.

Siam Thai Cuisine--the best Thai food I've had outside Asia (I'm half Thai, so I think I know my Thai food). Servings are small but that is because the chef uses the best quality ingredients she can find. My favourites including the Golden Cups (stay away from the satay--it has little flavour) and Prawn Wrap appetizers, choo chee pla, beef salad, pla dook foo (catfish salad--hard to find elsewhere), and sticky rice with coconut custard (sounds pedestrian, but their version is one of the better ones I've had). One caveat--the quality of the food depends on who is cooking. Try to make sure Samloy (the owner/chef) is preparing your food. It's just not as good otherwise.

India Palace or Taste of India--I'm not sure which I prefer, but I often judge Indian restaurants by the quality of their samosas. Both of these places have excellent samosas and tamarind sauce to boot. India Palace has better desserts, though.

Dim Sum Garden--not just for dim sum, but for the other food, as well. They are one of the only places left in the city that does poached chicken with ginger and scallions. Kum Koon Garden used to have the best dim sum, but since their spectacular renovation, the quality of the food has changed. It's not nearly as good as it used to be so Dim Sum Garden has regained its Number 1 position (at least on my list). If you go to Dim Sum Garden between 2pm and 5pm Mon-Sat, all the dim sum menu is $1.95/dish. Best to go on Saturdays when they have a full selection, otherwise you'll end up ordering from a much reduced menu, but go at 2 or you'll have a long wait for a table.

Other good Cantonese food--North Garden and Sun Fortune which are both in the south end of the city.

Asia City--Cheap Vietnamese food (very cheap though not as tasty as other places) and the best bubble tea anywhere. Their bubble tea is more like a slush than most other bubble teas. Get a fresh fruit one--the young coconut one is rich and creamy, mango tastes just like mango, and avocado is perfect.

Caribbean Delight--while I haven't had a full meal there, their patties are very good. Winnipeg has a number of Caribbean/West Indian restaurants though the quality has declined greatly over the last 10 years. I judge Caribbean restaurants by their patties, and Caribbean Delight had the best of the bunch (Tropikis even microwaved their patties!!!).

I'm sure there are other places I've forgotten, but this should give you at least an idea of what's out there.

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Prasantrin, welcome and thanks for a great post! It would be great to have you around here regularly to help keep us up to date on Winnipeg.

Steven A. Shaw aka "Fat Guy"
Co-founder, Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, sshaw@egstaff.org
Proud signatory to the eG Ethics code
Director, New Media Studies, International Culinary Center (take my food-blogging course)

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I think Green Gates and Pasta la Vista are both worth a try. Green Gates focuses on local and regional cuisine, while Pasta la Vista has nouveau Italian stuff (whatever that may mean).

Pasta la Vista is hit and miss though. I have ambivalent feelings about this place because I remember the first couple of years when it was open and the menu and the food itself seemed like incredible effort was put into each and ever dish. I've been there about ten or fifteen times, and the last time was a huge disappointment. Extremely oversalted food to the point where it was inedible. The soup was burnt as well. But generally speaking, I've had good experiences there. Pasta is for the most part prepared fresh and it shows. But nowadays, I get the impression the effort is no longer there.

East India Company is good if you're into the big feed of buffet restaurants. Although it does try to develop the upscale image.

I would have to disagree with prasantrin's assessment of Dim Sum Garden. Their dim sum is mediocre at best, and dare I suggest substandard at worst? The $1.95 deal is an excuse to provide poor quality in preparation and ingredients at a cheap price. The texture of the dumplings and freshness of the ingredients are the most prized aspects of good dim sum. Dim Sum Garden fails miserably on both counts.

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I think Green Gates and Pasta la Vista are both worth a try.  Green Gates focuses on local and regional cuisine, while Pasta la Vista has nouveau Italian stuff <snip> East India Company is good if you're into the big feed of buffet restaurants.  Although it does try to develop the upscale image.

I would have to disagree with prasantrin's assessment of Dim Sum Garden.  Their dim sum is mediocre at best, and dare I suggest substandard at worst?  The $1.95 deal is an excuse to provide poor quality in preparation and ingredients at a cheap price.  The texture of the dumplings and freshness of the ingredients are the most prized aspects of good dim sum.  Dim Sum Garden fails miserably on both counts.

I suspect our difference in opinion stems from very different taste buds. I thought Green Gates was terribly overrated--flavourless overcooked food. I may have visited on an off-night, but nothing about that experience has made me want to give it a second chance or recommend it to anyone. It has changed its menu recently, though, and is trying to appeal to the "average" Winnipeger. Perhaps the quality of food has also changed. Pasta la Vista is good, but nowhere near the range of Tre Visi or Amici's. I don't think their food is much above the Olive Garden in terms of quality. I've only been to East India Company once and at that time, their buffet was definitely geared to those who had little experience with Indian food. Everything tasted the same. I have heard that recently, though, their food has improved greatly and one can actually differentiate between dishes based on taste rather than name and appearance.

All three of the above restaurants, imo, are as popular as they are because of their appeal as restaurants rather than for their food. Winnipegers are known for their love of names and pretense. Decorate your restaurant well and throw some fancy names and ingredients on a menu and you're set. Green Gates and Pasta la Vista are the types of restaurants that seem sophisticated and, to a certain degree, ritzy. Wasabi and Sawatdee Thai (or pretty much any of the other Thai restaurants) are two other restaurants that fall under that category. I would bet the Ivory, the newest Indian restaurant, also fits there. People often mistake pleasant atmosphere and pretty decorations as signs of excellent food and in Winnipeg, I find this happens more often than not.

As for Dim Sum Garden, it is nowhere near the level of places like Grand Yatt in Toronto or Luk Yee in Hong Kong, but given the other choices, I believe it is the best. Grand Garden is horrible so there is no need to even try that place. Kum Koon used to be the best, but I believe they changed their recipes when they expanded--either consciously or as a consequence of adding more chefs. Their fried calamari was sweet (!!) and chewy, the shell of the har gau was tough (though the shrimp itself was plump and juicy), the siu mai had a very odd aftertaste, and the filling of the coconut buns was miniscule while the bread was hard and overbaked. Of the other dishes we tried, everything had been sweetened to a degree of unpleasantness. We had been going to Kum Koon for more than 20 years, so it was a great disappointment when the change occured. We did tell the owner's daughter our opinions but have not been back since so I don't know if the food has improved since then. In terms of atmosphere, however, it certainly is the nicest Chinese restaurant in Winnipeg.

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prasantrin:

I do agree with you to a large extent re: your assessment of decorating a few walls, hyping a place up and giving it a fancy name in order to call it a great dining experience. That is why I am so surprised with your assessment of Dim Sum Garden. Are we talking about the same place? The one on Rupert? You may be right. It is perhaps a difference in our taste preferences, but I find that place to be a hole. The bad florescent lighting, the use of white plastic garbage bags as tablecloths, the lack of natural lighting, the substandard cleanliness all make this place seem like a cheap joint. But putting aside physical appearances (for these are minor concerns when the food is top rate), the dim sum I truly believe is not even of professional standards. Seriously, I have made better dim sum as a non-professional cook. I refer specifically to one of the most important elements of dim sum preparation - the wrapping or skin of the har gow i.e. the shrimp dumpling. Dim sum is not dim sum without har kow. I think same goes for the rice rolls or cheung fun. Those in my humble opinion are the cornerstones of dim sum, and when the texture of those two items are compromised, it is said among dim sum diners that the chef lacks the "chefness" to make good dim sum. My experience with Dim Sum Garden has been oily, crumbly, scant, poorly constructed dumplings combined with the lack of expertise to make the all-important wrapper.

I'm not even talking about rating it to the same quality as the place you mentioned in Toronto. I'm just talking about basic preparation and knowledge of making a few good dumplings.

As for your reviews of Green Gates, I have not been there in probably seven or eight years so your assessment may be more on the mark then mine. As for Pasta la Vista, as I had mentioned I do have ambivalent feelings about the place because I think they showed some real effort in the first couple of years. I still think they are worth trying though.

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Wow- Winnipeg is waking up...this is a great post. I used to go there quarterly in the early 90's and some of these names were still there- Dubrovnik, Pasta la Vista, Amici.

But seriously, what do you guys think of 529 Wellington? Is it just a pretty restaurant with a Wine Spectator list or do they serve some decent food?

"I hate people who are not serious about their meals." Oscar Wilde

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prasantrin:

I do agree with you to a large extent re: your assessment of decorating a few walls, hyping a place up and giving it a fancy name in order to call it a great dining experience.  That is why I am so surprised with your assessment of Dim Sum Garden.  Are we talking about the same place?  The one on Rupert?  You may be right.  It is perhaps a difference in our taste preferences, but I find that place to be a hole.  The bad florescent lighting, the use of white plastic garbage bags as tablecloths, the lack of natural lighting, the substandard cleanliness all make this place seem like a cheap joint.  <snip>

Oh, it's definitely a hole. The lack of natural lighting gives it a basement-like feel and the fake plants are just so...fake but Kum Koon Garden pre-renovation had much the same atmosphere. All the Chinese Chinese restaurants (i.e. places you might actually find Chinese people) in Winnipeg (and many in other parts of the world) lack in cleanliness (except maybe North Garden--it's got the cleanest washroom of them all) so I can't really fault DSG on that (found dried hork in the sink at KKG once--completely ruined my dining experience, and in Macau some guy horked and spat on the *floor* inside a restaurant). The white plastic sheets (they aren't really garbage bags, just sheets of plastic) are rather ugly though I have seen them used elsewhere, (they used to use them at KKG but I can't remember if they still do) so they are not unique to DSG.

I guess my preference for DSG is relative. They are relatively good, especially if comparing them to other dim sum places in Winnipeg. I don't really care that much about atmosphere when it comes to Chinese food; I just want to eat and of the dim sum places in Winnipeg, right now it's the only one I would go to. I should try KKG again, but last I went, their prices were just too high for the quality of the food. Perhaps Jeff listened to my mother and made some changes, but I doubt his daughter even passed our concerns on to him.

I will say that I find that none of the dim sum places are very consistent with the quality of their dim sum (Grand Garden excluded--their dim sum is just plain bad all the time). I've had bad dim sum at DSG, but I've also had very good dim sum there. My Hong Kong Chinese friends often go to DSG for dim sum so it can't be all that bad (then again, if Canadians like to go to Earl's, does that make it good Canadian food? :smile:

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As an aside, I find it interesting eatbc put this post under "Toronto, Ontario, and Central Canada". I have always considered Winnipeg as western Canada, due mostly to the political regionalism of the country. I guess its different when you're talking geographically. Just an interesting observation.

I have not been to Kum Koon Garden since the renovation. I have actually heard similar things about KKG since the renovation - that the prices are much higher, but the food quality has not seen the same upward movement. I suppose he's got to find a way to pay for those renovations, although yes, I'm sure it is nice.

Do you go to Marigold (the one in Chinatown) for dim sum at all? I find that place to be very oily as well. As for Grand Garden, yes, I have to concur - it is disgusting.

I am only in Winnipeg two or three times a year now so I do not have the benefit of seeing any changes or updates to the restaurants. I haven't been to 529 Wellington, but I'd be interested in hearing how the menu fares.

I was at The Loop in the Exchange District back in December 2002. Sadly, it did not live up to the expectations I had of it from the FoodTV show, Opening Soon. What was I expecting though? Opening Soon isn't exactly about introducing the great culinary experience.

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As an aside, I find it interesting eatbc put this post under "Toronto, Ontario, and Central Canada".  I have always considered Winnipeg as western Canada, due mostly to the political regionalism of the country.  I guess its different when you're talking geographically. Just an interesting observation.

I have not been to Kum Koon Garden since the renovation.  I have actually heard similar things about KKG since the renovation - that the prices are much higher, but the food quality has not seen the same  upward movement.  I suppose he's got to find a way to pay for those renovations, although yes, I'm sure it is nice.

Do you go to Marigold (the one in Chinatown) for dim sum at all?  I find that place to be very oily as well.  As for Grand Garden, yes, I have to concur - it is disgusting.

I am only in Winnipeg two or three times a year now so I do not have the benefit of seeing any changes or updates to the restaurants.  I haven't been to 529 Wellington, but I'd be interested in hearing how the menu fares.

I was at The Loop in the Exchange District back in December 2002.  Sadly, it did not live up to the expectations I had of it from the FoodTV show, Opening Soon.  What was I expecting though?  Opening Soon isn't exactly about introducing the great culinary experience.

Winnipeg--east or west, interesting question. It's the geographic centre of Canada. Think a lot of people in Alberta and BC consider it a sort of suburb of Toronto, while people in Ontario and eastwards are inclined to think of it as the capital of one of the prairie provinces.

Arthur Johnson, aka "fresco"
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I was at The Loop in the Exchange District back in December 2002.  Sadly, it did not live up to the expectations I had of it from the FoodTV show, Opening Soon.  What was I expecting though?  Opening Soon isn't exactly about introducing the great culinary experience.

I just re-saw The Loop episode of Opening Soon FoodTV Canada show. Whatever happen to their executive chef Rolf Hagen? He was the focus & really hyped up on the television program.

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Steve

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Winnipeg--east or west, interesting question. It's the geographic centre of Canada. Think a lot of people in Alberta and BC consider it a sort of suburb of Toronto, while people in Ontario and eastwards are inclined to think of it as the capital of one of the prairie provinces.

Well, you know the whole "western alienation" concept studied to death in the 1980s? Manitoba figured into that debate. I think it might be considered last of the western provinces. But Alberta and BC probably see Winnipeg as the hinterland between that and Toronto. Sadly, Winnipeg is often left high and dry between the wild west and the so-called worldly Toronto. Admittedly, it fights for an identity, but I think Winnipeg is alot more sophisticated than most people give it credit. When you're an underdog, you have to look outward and upward.

As for Regina and Saskatoon, I dare not even try to define it.

I just re-saw The Loop episode of Opening Soon FoodTV Canada show. Whatever happen to their executive chef Rolf Hagen? He was the focus & really hyped up on the television program.

I don't know what happened to Rolf. But do you remember the Hunger Hut some nine or ten years ago? It was a restaurant housed in a HOUSE! Did he not cook there as well?

Edited by cwyc (log)
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I just re-saw The Loop episode of Opening Soon FoodTV Canada show. Whatever happen to their executive chef Rolf Hagen? He was the focus & really hyped up on the television program.

I don't know what happened to Rolf. But do you remember the Hunger Hut some nine or ten years ago? It was a restaurant housed in a HOUSE! Did he not cook there as well?

In The Loop episode, they say Rolf had worked at the Liberty Grill.

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Steve

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I just re-saw The Loop episode of Opening Soon FoodTV Canada show. Whatever happen to their executive chef Rolf Hagen? He was the focus & really hyped up on the television program.

Last I heard, Rolf was working somewhere out of town--Garson, Manitoba. It might be at a golf course/country club, but my memory is hazy.

I just thought of two more upscale-type places to dine. The Manitoba Club and St. Charles Country Club. I have been to neither though an acquaintance (who is very knowledgable about food and wine) raves about both. The chefs at both have competed on Canada's World Cup culinary team at some point (if that means anything). Unfortunately, one must be a member, or be dining with a member, to eat at either of them.

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  • 4 weeks later...

When people here talk about the East India Company restaurant, are they specifically refering to Chutneys? From what I`ve gather, the East Indian Company, could have several restaurants in Winnipeg, with Chutneys being their upscale restaurant. I just saw something on Chutneys the other day(that`s why I`m asking). I wonder if the food at Chutneys is any good.

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Steve

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When people here talk about the East India Company restaurant, are they specifically refering to Chutneys? From what I`ve gather, the East Indian Company, could have several restaurants in Winnipeg, with Chutneys being their upscale restaurant. I just saw something on Chutneys the other day(that`s why I`m asking). I wonder if the food at Chutneys is any good.

I think, but am not entirely sure, that Chutneys is East India Company's branch at the Forks. I have not eaten there (most of the "ethnic food" at the Forks isn't worth eating), but I just ate at EIC (the main branch on York, I think) last week. I went because I had been told that the food had improved a great deal since my last visit (admittedly, a few years ago). I can say that I was very disappointed. Many of their curries tasted only of salt with a bit of heat. Once every few bites I could taste cumin, but that's it (I'm sure there were other spices, but none in any discernable quantities). I was pleased to find lamb on the menu, but less pleased to find that there was very little meat on the very big bones in the curry (about 1x1x.5 inch of meat to a 4-6 inch bone). I tried a little of each of about half their curries (they had a dozen or so) and the only one I would eat again was the spinach paneer one. It didn't have a lot of flavour, either, but I liked its texture--very creamy. They did have a wide range of curries (both vegetarian and meat) but what's the point of having a wide range if they all taste the same? As for desserts, their burfy (burfee, burfi) was stale and flavourless but their jilebi was not bad. A little stale, but not as greasy as some I've had.

On that note, I sincerely doubt Chutneys would be much better. In Winnipeg, ethnic restaurants that are "upscale" are generally not very good and if EIC is Canadianized Indian food, then Chutneys is likely more so.

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When people here talk about the East India Company restaurant, are they specifically refering to Chutneys? From what I`ve gather, the East Indian Company, could have several restaurants in Winnipeg, with Chutneys being their upscale restaurant. I just saw something on Chutneys the other day(that`s why I`m asking). I wonder if the food at Chutneys is any good.

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Steve

I was just at the Fork's yesterday and it seems that Chutneys is no more. In its place is another Sushi Train (like Winnipeg needs yet another inferior sushi place). I guess East India Company is concentrating on their main restaurant and the new pub-style place they are opening soon (it may have already opened).

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Thanks prasantrin, for your two recent responses on my query about Chutneys(unfortunately I only saw your Sept 30 posting for the first time ever today, as I've been experiencing problems with my home computer the past month). Did some checking now, Chutneys was at the Forks Market.

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Steve

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What about the Winnipeg restaurant critics? Any of them influential and/or overly harsh? Can't remember the full story, & based on a foggy memory of it. Around 4 years ago, several Winnipeg restaurants sued(or threatened to sue) a restaurant critic, for this person's overly harsh reviews of their restaurants.

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Steve

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Well, well, well...what a pleasant surprise to see a flurry of posts about the Winnipeg dining scene. Much of the information is accurate - particularly prasantrin's on-the-mark observations. However, the restaurant scene in Winnipeg, as in other centres, is dynamic. For example, chef Terry Gereta has departed from Fusion Grill and has opened an upscale catering company with his pastry chef wife, Sue. A young female chef with experience at both Bluewater Cafe in Vancouver and Scaramouche in Toronto is on her way in, undoubtedly with fresh ideas...PROVIDING owner/maitre'd Scot McTaggart lets her do her thing. Chef Dale Nichols (Velvet Glove at the Fairmont) is long gone. 529 - the aforementioned infamous steak house - has become the haunt of the "beautiful people" (Richard Gere and Susan Sarandon reportedly dined there frequently during the recent filming of "Shall we Dance" with J. Lo - with Gere supposedly raving about the salmon as he's not a meat eater). Quality is good, especially if WoW! Corporation's Executive Chef Michael D'Acquisto is actually in the kitchen. It's loosely modelled - foodwise and pricewise - on Montréal's Queue de Cheval, except the room is much more traditional (the old Khartum Shriner's Temple on Wellington Crescent...if walls could speak!). However, the steakhouse concept is not for everyone, so...

Bright spots: In addition to the little 44 seat restaurant Tre Visi (call chef/owner Giacomo Appice on Monday or Tuesday to pick up market-fresh Mediterranean fish from the Portuguese fish market for Wednesday or Thursday dining), La Vieille Gare shows great promise. Young chef Luc Jean is definitely capable of producing fabulously inventive fare, but I would personally phone him to prepare a "special" menu if dining there...he thrives on a challenge (and a guest who allows him to break free from the owner's strict food cost formula). Chef Lau Young at Provençe Bistro in the Niakwa Country Club (open to the public), is a protegé of the amazing Takashi Murakami. His debut as chef de cuisine was rather ignominious, but he's been slowly finding his style in this restaurant which is owned by the former proprietor of the now-defunct Beaujolais Restaurant, Valerie Anne Owen. Chef/owner Ohno's son, Mak, has revamped the menu at Edohei after doing stages in the Languedoc and in London, and he brings a fresh new touch to the menu that transcends typical sushi/Japanese restaurant fare. Bonfire Bistro, located on an out-of-the-way stretch of Corydon Avenue, is a fun neighbourhood spot with high marks for yum factor. It's been spotty over the summer, but a couple of recent visits have been spot on. A wood-fired pizza with grilled pineapple, smoked Mennonite ham, roasted red peppers, grilled red onions, habanero chilies, monterey jack and cheddar cheeses and finished with a dusting of freshly chopped cilantro was SO good that I had it for lunch AND dinner on the same day. Great value at Bonfire.

I could go on...but I'm sure I've lost most of the readers about 150 words ago.

By the way, enough cannot be said about the influence of the very active Manitoba Chapter of the Confrerie de la Chaine des Rotisseurs in pushing the top Winnipeg establishments to achieve "personal bests", year after year. We are fortunate indeed to have the well-travelled and sage influences of Chefs Takashi Murakami and Bernard Mirlycourtois (St. Charles Country Club and Manitoba Club respectively) constantly prodding and encouraging Winnipeg's culinary professionals through Chaine involvement.

By the way, Winnipeggers hearts generally lie in Western Canada, but we're smart enough to milk the eastern influence for all it's worth. (tongue firmly in cheek, please!)

By the way easterners, I'll be in Toronto and Niagara from the 15th to the 20th of October. Any cutting-edge new spots that are can't miss? I'm travelling with a journalist (NOT the food critic!) from the Winnipeg Free Press, so there could even be a story there, if worthwhile...

's'about the wine...or the food, no - the wine...maybe the food...definitely the wine...but it has to be the food...oh, stop whining! Aarrghh!!!

Winefellow - Proprietor, Kenaston Wine Market. Winnipeg, Canada

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winefellow thanks for your comments on the Winnipeg restaurant scene. Any opinions on Manitoba beef(is it excellent etc.)? Don`t know much about it, except that Steven Shaw(Fat Guy), mentioned it alongside Alberta beef as being the best Canadian beef.

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Steve

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