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Two syrah with dinner


Florida Jim
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With grilled chicken breasts; a roasted tomato, black bean, corn and onion salsa; white cornbread, and, a green salad:

1998 Fox Creek, Shiraz Reserve:

powerful blackberry, black raspberry and eucalyptus aromas with a strong American oak overlay/

full body, very focused flavors echo the nose with a slight candied element, concentrated and intense, fair balance/

drying finish.

For those who enjoy the nose, the palate delivers. But I sincerely doubt this wine will get better with age. And, personally, I have no use for it.

1999 Jamet, Cote-Rotie:

red fruit, ash tray, green olive and brett dominate the nose; a bit of spice and meat/

medium body, bright red fruit tones with medium complexity using the olive and spice elements to compliment the fruit, a bit of wood intrudes, moderately concentrated with decent balance/

medium length finish.

Better made wine than the shiraz, but not by much. Its a shame to see Jamet do a less than par job in such a fine vintage. And from what I hear of the 2000’s, this is another producer to cross off the purchase list. Ah, well . . .

Best, Jim

www.CowanCellars.com

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With grilled chicken breasts; a roasted tomato, black bean, corn and onion salsa; white cornbread, and, a green salad:

1998 Fox Creek, Shiraz Reserve:

powerful blackberry, black raspberry and eucalyptus aromas with a strong American oak overlay/

full body, very focused flavors echo the nose with a slight candied element, concentrated and intense, fair balance/

drying finish.

For those who enjoy the nose, the palate delivers. But I sincerely doubt this wine will get better with age. And, personally, I have no use for it.

I wsa surprised to read your conclusion, given that your description of the wine is one generally considered to be favorable when used in today's wine press. You obviously do not have a preference for Mr. Parker's palate :biggrin: I have had the wine and share your description. I do, however, enjoy wines of this style and this one in particular. Your pairing sounds appropriate to me.

John Sconzo, M.D. aka "docsconz"

"Remember that a very good sardine is always preferable to a not that good lobster."

- Ferran Adria on eGullet 12/16/2004.

Docsconz - Musings on Food and Life

Slow Food Saratoga Region - Co-Founder

Twitter - @docsconz

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I was surprised to read your conclusion, given that your description of the wine is one generally considered to be favorable when used in today's wine press.

I try to be objective about the wine, even if it is not to my preference. There are lots of folks who love this wine and many more who simply enjoy it. I am sorry to say that my range is just not great enough.

Best, Jim

www.CowanCellars.com

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Jim - you say the Jamet was full of Brett but was 'better made' than the Australian. Can you elaborate a bit on that.

Thanks,

Craig

Structure and balance are better in the Jamet - that's all I really meant.

Neither was undrinkable by any means; simply not my preference.

And, oh yeah, I have a moderate tolerance for brett.

Best, Jim

www.CowanCellars.com

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interesting how descriptors and preferences may seem at odds, huh? i was surprised to see your conclusion as well, jim, given how you'd described the wine. it sounds an awful lot like one of my drink-now fruit bombs (t vines), which i don't believe will get much better, either. then again.......it's pretty yummy now, for my taste anyway.

on another syrah topic: has anyone had the d'arenberg 'the dead arm' '98? i splurged a year or so ago and picked up 3 of the single vintage labels, the dead arm being one of them. i'd be interested to hear opinions of the wine in general, and some thoughts about maturity.

thanks!

matt

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Jim - you say the Jamet was full of Brett but was 'better made' than the Australian. Can you elaborate a bit on that.

I do not always equate the presence of brett with a defect, especially in the Rhone where a little merde is expected. However, I often find that it is due to other factors than actual Brett. Mourvedre, which of course would not be in the Jamet, often gives a brett-like aroma to wine. I had an Alain Graillot St. Joseph that was fairly funkadelic, to the point where I also assumed some brett had got in. It was not a bad wine, and actually paired well with our food the evening.

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