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Food History Articles and Links


liuzhou
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41 minutes ago, Anna N said:

Quite fascinating. Although almost all the dishes are quite familiar you might be hard-pressed to find many of them on a modern restaurant menu. Grilled cheese and bacon probably not show up on the menu in any Canadian restaurant. 

 

A few of the dishes would still appear on some menus in London. The sort of places working people use for lunch, rather  than a night out kind of venue.

 

Is grilled cheese on that menu? I can't see it. And the  grilled bacon accompanies kidneys, so that would still apppear in London, too.

P.S. Of course, they are using the British English meaning of 'grilled'. What you may call 'broiled'.
 

...your dancing child with his Chinese suit.

 

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52 minutes ago, liuzhou said:

Is grilled cheese on that menu? I can't see it. And the  grilled bacon accompanies kidneys, so that would still apppear in London, too.

Nope. Poor copy editing on my part. I dictated kidney, I think but it got changed to cheese, I think!

I think I did understand what they meant by grilled. I am not quite sure that what I think of as a mixed grill would necessarily be correct. I would think of lamb chops lamb kidneys, beef steak, tomatoes and mushrooms. 
 

I have had many mixed grills over here but they have been of cuisines other than British.

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

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1 hour ago, Margaret Pilgrim said:

Nor might grilled kidneys and bacon.

My original post has been corrected. 

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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2 minutes ago, Anna N said:

I am not quite sure that what I think of as a mixed grill would necessarily be correct. I would think of lamb chops lamb kidneys, beef steak, tomatoes and mushrooms. 

 

Yes. Probably sausages (pork) and fried eggs, too. I haven't had one in decades!

 

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Quite fascinating. do you happen to know the meaning of  “A Harrico of Mutton“.  This dish comes up elsewhere on something you posted. I believe it was a restaurant menu from the turn of the last century. Does not seem to have any relationship to beans. But I could be missing something. 

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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8 minutes ago, Anna N said:

Quite fascinating. do you happen to know the meaning of  “A Harrico of Mutton“.  This dish comes up elsewhere on something you posted. I believe it was a restaurant menu from the turn of the last century. Does not seem to have any relationship to beans. But I could be missing something. 

 

The original meaning of harrico or haricot was: 
 

Quote

haricot, n.

(ˈhærɪkəʊ, -kɒt)

 

Also 7 aricot, 8 arico, harricot, 8–9 harico, harrico.

 

[a. F. haricot (16th c. in Littré), in 14th c. hericoq de mouton (Hatz.-Darm.), hericot (Littré), in sense 1; in sense 2 Hatz.-Darm. cite fevre de haricot of 1642. Origin uncertain: see Littré.]

 

1.1 A ragout (originally of mutton, now sometimes of other meat). Also attrib.

 

[1611 Cotgr., Haricot, mutton sod with little turneps, some wine, and tosts of bred crumbled among.] 1706 Phillips (ed. Kersey), Haricot, a particular way of dressing Mutton-cutlets, or several sorts of Fowl and Fish in a Ragoo with Turneps; also a kind of French beans.    
1769 Mrs. Raffald Eng. Housekpr.

(1778) 102 Harico of a Neck of Mutton.    
1816 Catherine Hutton in W. Hutton's Autobiog. Concl. 90 Harico of mutton and gooseberry pudding. 1870 Daily News 16 Nov., Irish stew or haricot mutton.


The name for the beans came later. Haricot beans were the beans commonly used in harricots of mutton.

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3 minutes ago, liuzhou said:

The original meaning of harrico or haricot was: 

Thank you so very much. 

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...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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“Who loves a garden, loves a greenhouse too.” - William Cowper, The Task, Book Three

 

"Not knowing the scope of your own ignorance is part of the human condition...The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” - psychologist David Dunning

 

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“Who loves a garden, loves a greenhouse too.” - William Cowper, The Task, Book Three

 

"Not knowing the scope of your own ignorance is part of the human condition...The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” - psychologist David Dunning

 

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  • 2 weeks later...
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“Who loves a garden, loves a greenhouse too.” - William Cowper, The Task, Book Three

 

"Not knowing the scope of your own ignorance is part of the human condition...The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” - psychologist David Dunning

 

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Meant to post this a few days ago, when I saw it initially, but forgot...

https://qz.com/1176962/map-how-the-word-tea-spread-over-land-and-sea-to-conquer-the-world/

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“Who loves a garden, loves a greenhouse too.” - William Cowper, The Task, Book Three

 

"Not knowing the scope of your own ignorance is part of the human condition...The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” - psychologist David Dunning

 

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Pushing back the "known" date for animal husbandry...

https://www.pnas.org/content/118/25/e2100901118

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“Who loves a garden, loves a greenhouse too.” - William Cowper, The Task, Book Three

 

"Not knowing the scope of your own ignorance is part of the human condition...The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” - psychologist David Dunning

 

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Posted (edited)

It's National Gin Day! Who decides these things? Anyway, here is an interesting, if short, article on the history of gin.

 

https://www.historic-uk.com/CultureUK/Mothers-Ruin/

I'm off to celebrate with a G+T.

 

686949959_BombayGin.thumb.jpg.85003450d716123ced244bd70922b524.jpg

Edited by liuzhou (log)
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...your dancing child with his Chinese suit.

 

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4 hours ago, liuzhou said:

but then I read this.

What a fascinating exploration of a strange behaviour. I may never look at a potato again without wondering if it’s  boneless.  

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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“Who loves a garden, loves a greenhouse too.” - William Cowper, The Task, Book Three

 

"Not knowing the scope of your own ignorance is part of the human condition...The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” - psychologist David Dunning

 

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Posted (edited)
45 minutes ago, chromedome said:

 

I'm sorry, but that article is nonsensical. Medlars were common when I was growing up in the 50s and 60s. My grandparents had them growing their large garden.

Medlars are still commonly grown. I saw them in England in 2019. oth growing and the fruit one of the supermarkets selling them, although the article says no supermarkets sell them!

 

Nor were either Shakespeare or Henry VIII 'medieval' as the article states.

Edited by liuzhou (log)
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Posted (edited)
5 hours ago, Tropicalsenior said:

This article indicates just how far back some of our favorite foods actually go. Much of the dating seems to be on conjecture but it does show that even the ancients gave a lot of thought to food preparation.

 

That article is riddled with errors, most notably regarding the Forme of Cury. They grudgingly concede that 'cury' came into English from the French  and simply meant 'cookery', but then stubbornly go onto insist it has something to do with curry. It doesn't in any way. Also, the "curry recipe" in the 1747 book by Hannah Glasse called The Art of Cookery they reference bears no resemblance to anything anyone would consider a curry today. India certainly would disown it!

Edited by liuzhou (log)

...your dancing child with his Chinese suit.

 

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1 hour ago, liuzhou said:

That article is riddled with errors,

You're right. Reading back through it some parts of it almost makes me laugh. The idea of Mayan warriors running through the jungles with tamales in their pockets 7000 years ago is pretty ridiculous. My idea in posting the article was to show that many of our foods of today do have a similarity with Foods of past civilizations and that even then, they were taking care in the preparation  of food using spices and aromatics.

Edited by Tropicalsenior (log)
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