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Charcuterie and Salumi by Michael Ruhlman


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Good afternoon

 

I am considering Charcuterie or Salumi by Mark Rhulman. Before I make the purchase, I am wondering if either of these books are useful for someone who keeps kosher and therefore does not eat pork. Beef, poultry, and lamb are all possible and easily available. 

 

Thanks! 

Edited by Smithy
Corrected title spelling (log)

"Salt is born of the purest of parents: the sun and the sea." --Pythagoras.

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Charcuterie has several recipes involving beef as well as duck, other fowl, fish, and even veggies. Lots of pork, too, of course. I don't recall lamb, but there may be some in there.

 

Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

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The only caveat to that is that even some of the non-pork sounding dishes use pork fat.  I did the chicken galantine recently and that has pork fatback.  The venison terrine does as well.  You might see if there is instead a book focused on kosher charcuterie.  

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My friend Lloyd makes a lot of kosher charcuterie... https://kosherdosher.blogspot.com/

The basic techniques and rules are the same no matter what meat you're working with.

Curing tool here, some background here.

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~Martin :)

I just don't want to look back and think "I could have eaten that."

Unsupervised, rebellious, radical agrarian experimenter, minimalist penny-pincher, and adventurous cook. Crotchety, cantankerous, terse curmudgeon, non-conformist, and contrarian who questions everything!

The best thing about a vegetable garden is all the meat you can hunt and trap out of it!

 

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Thanks for the advice everyone. I'll have to give it a good look again before buying.

"Salt is born of the purest of parents: the sun and the sea." --Pythagoras.

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  • 5 months later...
On 4/16/2020 at 9:19 AM, DanM said:

Good afternoon

 

I am considering Charcuterie or Salumi by Mark Rhulman. Before I make the purchase, I am wondering if either of these books are useful for someone who keeps kosher and therefore does not eat pork. Beef, poultry, and lamb are all possible and easily available. 

 

Thanks! 

Hello,

I cannot  comment on either book however I just finished reading about ALL BEEF HARD SALAMI... The basic recipe was the same as one using some {or all} pork... This recipe did not allow  the use of any but artificial casings made  from BEEF collagen... The lean to fat was the same at 80/20... Thinking of trying it myself... Joe Wood

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On 10/1/2020 at 11:52 AM, Joe Wood said:

Hello,

I cannot  comment on either book however I just finished reading about ALL BEEF HARD SALAMI... The basic recipe was the same as one using some {or all} pork... This recipe did not allow  the use of any but artificial casings made  from BEEF collagen... The lean to fat was the same at 80/20... Thinking of trying it myself... Joe Wood

Has anyone experienced a batch of hard salami "slowing down" the curing process? By this I mean it's almost three weeks in , covered completely with nice white penicillium nalgiovense, but not getting any drier... Temp and humidity are within normal range...  Any thoughts?

 

On 10/1/2020 at 11:52 AM, Joe Wood said:

Hello,

I cannot  comment on either book however I just finished reading about ALL BEEF HARD SALAMI... The basic recipe was the same as one using some {or all} pork... This recipe did not allow  the use of any but artificial casings made  from BEEF collagen... The lean to fat was the same at 80/20... Thinking of trying it myself... Joe Wood

 

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Hello to all hard salami buffs... I've been reading several recipes for hard aged salami containing POWDERED MILK... One such recipe calls for ONE FULL CUP OF POWDERED MILK to every five lbs. of meat... I read it was used as a BINDER {?}

Can anyone who does this or is familiar with it explain what it does ? How it effects the final product? 

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