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Bentley

Converting a ganache recipe from molded to slabbed

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I have a recipe for ganache that I use in molded bonbons but it is too soft to use in a framed ganache. The recipe for the ganache used in the molded bonbons has water content of 24.76%, sugar content of 31.94%, cocoa butter content of 16.3% and milkfat content of 18.3%.  This makes a ganache that pipes in very fluid, self levels and crystalizes to a very soft creamy texture.   

 

Another recipe I did for a framed ganache had water content of  28.74%, sugar content of 22.72%, cocoa butter content of 19.05% and milkfat content of 17.81%.  Higher water content but also higher cocoa butter content, so it would seem that the cocoa butter has the most impact on the firmness of the ganache.    

 

If I want to convert the first recipe to a framed ganache, what would be the best way to go about it? 

 

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18 minutes ago, Bentley said:

I have a recipe for ganache that I use in molded bonbons but it is too soft to use in a framed ganache. The recipe for the ganache used in the molded bonbons has water content of 24.76%, sugar content of 31.94%, cocoa butter content of 16.3% and milkfat content of 18.3%.  This makes a ganache that pipes in very fluid, self levels and crystalizes to a very soft creamy texture.   

 

Another recipe I did for a framed ganache had water content of  28.74%, sugar content of 22.72%, cocoa butter content of 19.05% and milkfat content of 17.81%.  Higher water content but also higher cocoa butter content, so it would seem that the cocoa butter has the most impact on the firmness of the ganache.    

 

If I want to convert the first recipe to a framed ganache, what would be the best way to go about it? 

 

Add more chocolate or just cocoa butter until the cb percentage is high enough to cut. You want 19+% in general, although I have a few dark chocolate ganaches that push the envelope under that percentage. What kind of chocolate?

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Posted (edited)

Thanks.  The recipe I want to convert uses Opalys white chocolate, which is 33% cocoa butter.  

Is it as easy as adding more chocolate or cocoa butter - I don't need to worry about rebalancing the sugar and water?   Is there a difference between adding chocolate (which increases cocoa butter and sugar) and reducing cream (which increases percentage of cocoa butter, reduces water and reduces milkfats)?


Edited by Bentley (log)

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Update:  I reformulated the recipe so that water was 23.43%, cocoa butter was 20.50% and milkfat was 21.9%.  The ganache ending up being too soft and, although I could cut it, it did spread a little so that my little squares weren't perfect.  

I think I will remove some cream and add more chocolate to reduce the water and milkfat and increase the cocoa butter closer to 22%. Trial and error, I suppose. 

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1 minute ago, Bentley said:

Update:  I reformulated the recipe so that water was 23.43%, cocoa butter was 20.50% and milkfat was 21.9%.  The ganache ending up being too soft and, although I could cut it, it did spread a little so that my little squares weren't perfect.  

I think I will remove some cream and add more chocolate to reduce the water and milkfat and increase the cocoa butter closer to 22%. Trial and error, I suppose. 

For slabbed ganaches, Melissa Coppel recommended cocoa butter percentages as follows:

Dark 22%

Milk + Dark 25%

Dark 28%

White 33%

 

Now, I’m not sure I agree 100% because I’ve made ganaches that set just fine at lower percentages, and I like a softer mouthfeel; however, I canNOT imagine that a properly made ganache at these percentages would not be firm enough to cut on a guitar. 

 

Are you tempering the ganache? You can table it on the actual table or in a hotel pan until it gets to about 28C and then frame or you can temper with silk. Another thing, Ramon Morató recommended putting all ganache slabs straight into the fridge or a cold room to crystallize quickly. We had one ganache at the class I just took that was super sticky and he said it hadn’t been tempered properly because he knew the recipe was sound. 

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Posted (edited)

I'm doing white...so I will have to really up the cocoa butter.  33% sounds pretty high, but clearly my 20% was not high enough.   I am tempering the ganache with 1% silk.  

(Also, in your post above, I think you meant "Milk 28%")


Edited by Bentley (log)

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