Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Edit History

kitchen_muse

kitchen_muse


forgot to mention my equipment and fixed my first statement

On 11/15/2018 at 5:25 PM, jackmash said:

I usually take 30 gms of coffee beans (ground) and a cup of water (200 ml) with a temperature of 90 degrees C to make my Espresso. But the thing is, the bitterness is so strong and the taste of the espresso is way off. I have experimented with different combinations. For example, I tried with 25, even 22 gms of coffee beans. But, I always missed out the ideal combo. I usually stir it for 20 seconds, not more. And, I use the frothing wand that is common in espresso machines to steam my milk. I don't know how long we are supposed to steam though. But, for me, it won't take more than 10 seconds. I don't know when I will be able to make an ideal espresso. Can someone please help?

 

Just passing by - since it's hard to add something worthy after previous comment. But I'd like to add that freshness of beans really matters a lot. I read once that oils start degrading right after the roasting, that's why the fresher the roast the better. That's not a gospel truth, though, and some coffee makers like to experiment older beans (up to 1/2 of a year). Thanks to weinoo for pointing it out. 

Don't forget that you'll need a proper storage for your beans as well. Vacuum sealed dark glass jar would be perfect - just don't left it under the sun.
And another tip from a coffee enthusiast, try to document each step you made before you got a good cup of espresso. Bean type, origin, size of grounds, which water you used... That will help you to reproduce the whole process since, it's a chemistry after all. 

On 11/29/2018 at 2:08 PM, jackmash said:

Do you guys mind sharing what beans you use to make the espresso? Do you always try to get new beans and grind it yourself? I heard even the age of beans play a crucial role in making a good espresso! 

I love to mix Colombian with Guatemalan. My equipment is not the best, but it works fine for me. 
upd: and as a result I totally forgot to mention it! Breville BS810 for espresso machine and Baratza grinder.

kitchen_muse

kitchen_muse

Just passing by - since it's hard to add something worthy after previous comment. But I'd like to add that freshness of beans really matters a lot. I read once that oils start degrading right after the roasting, that's why the fresher the roast the better.

Don't forget that you'll need a proper storage for your beans as well. Vacuum sealed dark glass jar would be perfect - just don't left it under the sun.
And another tip from a coffee enthusiast, try to document each step you made before you got a good cup of espresso. Bean type, origin, size of grounds, which water you used... That will help you to reproduce the whole process since, it's a chemistry after all. 

On 11/29/2018 at 2:08 PM, jackmash said:

Do you guys mind sharing what beans you use to make the espresso? Do you always try to get new beans and grind it yourself? I heard even the age of beans play a crucial role in making a good espresso! 

I love to mix Colombian with Guatemalan. My equipment is not the best, but it works fine for me. 

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×