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helenjp

helenjp


clarity

I used to work in a Chinese grocery way back when. In English, we called this type "cloud ear". This is what I think is in your photo, though the underside is hard to see.

"Cloud ear" (Japanese kikurage = "wood jellyfish", but written with the characters for "wood ear", which gives you some idea of how closely related cloud ear and wood ear are) and the pale "snow" or "jelly" fungus or mushroom (Japanese shiro-kikurage "white cloud ear/wood ear) are usually almost the same color on both sides when dried, and more translucent when soaked than wood ear. I think they expand more than wood ear.

Wood ear have a dark top side and a slightly fuzzy pale underside. There is a special name for this "light underside" type in Japanese, but they are not common here, so they are usually called "black wood/cloud ear" (kuro-kikurage). They are usually a bit cheaper than cloud ear, but in many dishes where they are shredded, it is possible to sub one type for another.

One reason why people are so eager to call everything by the same name is that the translucent type used to be called Jew's ear in English. 

helenjp

helenjp


clarity

I used to work in a Chinese grocery way back when. In English, we called this type "wood ear". When dried, it is usually blackish on one side and beige or cream on the underside. They are slightly tougher than cloud ear and usually cheaper. They are closely related to the translucent type we called cloud ear (kikurage in Japanese). There is a special name for this "light underside" type in Japanese, but they are not common here, so they are usually called "black wood/cloud ear" (kurokikurage). This is what I think is in your photo, though the light underside is hard to see.

 

"Cloud ear" (Japanese kikurage = "wood jellyfish", but written with the characters for "wood ear") and the pale "snow" or "jelly" fungus or mushroom (Japanese shiro-kikurage "white cloud ear/wood ear) are usually the same color on both sides when dried, and more translucent when soaked. I think they expand a bit more than wood ear.

One reason why people are so eager to call everything by the same name is that the translucent type used to be called Jew's ear in English. 

helenjp

helenjp

I used to work in a Chinese grocery way back when. In English, we called this type "wood ear". When dried, it is usually blackish on one side and beige or cream on the underside. They are slightly tougher than cloud ear and usually cheaper. They are closely related to the translucent type we called cloud ear (kikurage in Japanese). There is a special name for this "light underside" type in Japanese, but they are not common here, so they are usually called "black wood ear" (kurokikurage). This is what I think is in your photo, though the light underside is hard to see.

 

"Cloud ear" (Japanese kikurage = "wood jellyfish", but written with the characters for "wood ear") and the pale "snow" or "jelly" fungus or mushroom (Japanese shiro-kikurage "white cloud ear/wood ear) are usually the same color on both sides when dried, and more translucent when soaked. I think they expand a bit more than wood ear.

One reason why people are so eager to call everything by the same name is that the translucent type used to be called Jew's ear in English. 

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