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quiet1

Purchased truffles - ganache filling has 'cooked' taste?

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A visitor from Switzerland recently brought some exceptionally tasty chocolate truffles as a gift, and I find myself wondering how they were done. I have done a tiny amount of truffle making myself for holiday gifts, but I am nothing near expert with techniques or flavors of different types of chocolate. Given how much everyone in the house enjoyed them, though, I am wondering if I can produce something similar at home when we particularly feel like a treat.

I know that different chocolates will give different flavors, which I am prepared to experiment with a bit. What is stumping me is that the dark chocolate ganache filling has a cooked or almost burnt taste to it to me - not strong, and not caramel. It is very much like the scent that you get when baking something like brownies. Is it possible that they intentionally overheated a small amount of chocolate to get that flavor, or is it something that some varieties of chocolate have naturally?

(I am working my way through various chocolate threads on egullet ATM. I had no idea I'd been quite lucky with my previous ganache efforts as I've never had any major issues with behavior or texture. Though I imagine having done it just for the home in small amounts helps - I never made enough for gifts that long term shelf life would be an issue.)

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