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Fun with a centrifuge


Nicholo P
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COOL! My wife has a centrifuge at her workplace... I could see slipping in after hours some night to spin up some culinary treats!

-drew

www.drewvogel.com

"Now I'll tell you what, there's never been a baby born, at least never one come into the Firehouse, who won't stop fussing if you stick a cherry in its face." -- Jack McDavid, Jack's Firehouse restaurant

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  • 3 years later...

I'm considering getting a PrO-Xtract5 or a ProXtract5R and I have a few questions.

 

Is 4000rpm enough for most applications?

 

Do I need the refrigerated version? What applications require cooling? I do understand bacteria may grow if I spin stock for several hours at room temperature, but are cycle time so long that cooling is required?

 

Is this unit good? It seems to be constructed for food.

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If you spin for even an hour bacteria are a concern if there's no cooling.  Room temp is bad enough, but the air friction will heat the centrifuge.  I'd use refrigeration.

Edited by gfweb
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36 minutes ago, gfweb said:

If you spin for even an hour bacteria are a concern if there's no cooling.  Room temp is bad enough, but the air friction will heat the centrifuge.  I'd use refrigeration.

 

 Thanks, I will probably go for the refrigerated version. Is 4000rpm good enough or are there applications that require more than that?

 

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It's not the RPM that is important, but rather the g-force it can produce.  You can have two centrifuges running at 4,000 rpm, but the one with a larger diameter rotor will be generating more g-force.

 

The Centurions you're interested in have a maximum force of 4,800g.  By way of comparison, Modernist Cuisine recommends a 30,000g centrifuge and many of their recipes specify 27,500g.  This probably means that there are certain effects that would not be possible with the Centurion centrifuges you're looking at. That said, most everything will be possible.  The difference is that it will take longer.  Let's say that the Modernist Cuisine recipe says that you should spin something at 27,500g for an hour.  You would need to spin it for around six hours to get a similar effect at 4,500g.

 

Good discussion here.

--

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  • 4 months later...

A week ago I recieved my centrifuge, A Pro-Xtract3R capaple of 4 * 750ml at 4000rpm. However when running it for 1-2 hours I have several times got a "drive error" message and the unit shuts down.
The manufacturer claims that this is beacuse i'm overloading the unit and that the buckets should only be filled with 2/3 of their volume if the contens density equals water (500gr). This is not specified anywhere in the documentation. Has anyone heard of similar limitations on other fuges?

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