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Spaghetti Aglio e Olio (garlic and oil)


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I look forward to some tips on the technique to cook a nice spaghetti Alio Orio?

Thanks you,

Alex

主泡一杯邀西方. 馥郁幽香而湧.三焦回转沁心房

"Inhale the aroma before tasting and drinking, savour the goodness from the heart "

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I look forward to some tips on the technique to cook a nice spaghetti Alio Orio?

Thanks you,

Alex

In Italian it's Aglio (garlic) e (and) Olio (oil). It varies in Italian dialects but it is never called Alio Orio. This is one of those dishes that people have strong opinions about. Some people slice the garlic, some mince, some put whole crushed into extra virgin olive oil in a saute pan. Some allow the garlic to darken in the oil and remove it before serving. Some swear by the addition of red pepper flakes others say parmesan cheese should never be in it. I could go on but you hopefully get the point. It is a simple quick dish that can be prepared at a minutes notice with ingredients usually at hand. For me it consists of minced fresh garlic, extra virgin olive oil, crushed red pepper flakes, chopped fresh parsley, cooked spaghetti and (optional) freshly grated parmesan cheese plus salt and pepper.

I saute minced fresh garlic in extra virgin olive oil till softened, add crushed red pepper flakes and let saute for a few seconds then season with S & P. Toss drained cooked spaghetti in the pan along with a little pasta cooking water and add some chopped fresh parsley and mix well. Serve at once with freshly grated parmesan cheese.

So easy and so good!

Kate

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Thats about it...I used thinly sliced garlic and crushed dried Thai chilis. I usually warm the oil with the garlic and chilis when I start the pot of water and then let it sit until the spaghetti as almost cooked. Tops with fresh parsley and cheese.

one of the first things I learned to cook...after scrambled eggs of course

tracey

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Me too -- minced fresh garlic, crushed dried chilli and olive oil. I don't really saute the garlic and peppers, just warm them very slowly while the pasta cooks: the garlic shouldn't colour, I think. Not too little oil. O, and I think it helps if you only use part of the oil to warm, and add some cold oil as well, because the flavour of the oil tends to get lost in cooking.

I don't salt the sauce.

I will usually add parmesan, but only a little, and it's not essential.

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Kate, Tracey and Paul, thanks for sharing. Sorry I spelled it wrongly. It should be, spaghetti "Alio e Olio" Many version and style of cooking. I learned the finer point. Many thanks and good days. Alex

主泡一杯邀西方. 馥郁幽香而湧.三焦回转沁心房

"Inhale the aroma before tasting and drinking, savour the goodness from the heart "

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While the spaghetti is cooking, warm a generous amount of extra-virgin olive oil gently in a large frying pan. Add a piece of dried chili or a whole small one (broken for more strength, left whole to be milder) and either a crushed clove or two of garlic or a couple of thin-sliced cloves. The garlic should become soft but not brown. If you are using a whole crush clove, remove it (or them) and discard when golden. Remove the pepper too. When the spaghetti is al dente, lift it out of the pot with a hand-held colander, big fork, or whatever works for you, and drop it into the frying pan. Toss it over low heat and serve immediately. You can top it with chopped parsley but not cheese.

Maureen B. Fant
www.maureenbfant.com

www.elifanttours.com

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  • 5 weeks later...

I make this sauce a lot. About fifty-fifty on adding the crushed red peppers. I do make a version of it though where I add equal parts butter and olive oil. It isn't technically Aglio e Olio anymore, but it's still very good. I do this when I feel like a richer sauce.

"...which usually means underflavored, undersalted modern French cooking hidden under edible flowers and Mexican fruits."

- Jeffrey Steingarten, in reference to "California Cuisine".

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  • 7 years later...
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