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maxmillan

Oolong Teas: a complex world between green & black

155 posts in this topic

I received this tea and was told to pour hot water over it for a few seconds and then pour the water out. It was suggested that I clean the leaves before steeping it. This tea is highly expensive and I would like some expert opinion on this. When I first saw this tea, it looked like poo from a large rodent.

I also had some Dragon Eye tea made by a friend and it was beautiful. I like to get some of this and wonder what the steeping method is for this type of tea? The leaves are wrapped very tightly into little balls and only requires one or two balls per cup. When it unravels it looks like spiders!

Thanks!

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Yes, this is the proper way to prepare most oolong teas-

water is not boiling-160-180 degrees

the tea is rinsed and first water is thrown away-it is rinsed with only a small amount of water-

this allows for tea leaves to open-and also" to clean it"

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And if it is really a high quality oolong, then expect to be able to get at least 4 or 5 infusions out of each dosage of leaves... don't throw them away after just one steeping (which should only be around 2 minutes).

All this is predicated on your making it in a little pot and pouring all the tea off the leaves after each steep is done. Don't know how it would turn out if made in a big pot and the leaves were left to slosh around in the tea as you drank your way through the pot.


Christopher D. Holst aka "cdh"

Learn to brew beer with my eGCI course

Chris Holst, Attorney-at-Lunch

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Oolongs have become my favorite category of teas. The range of flavor profiles in these teas from mainland China and Taiwan is substantial and the best have complex layers. From the lighter floral to the darker roasted.

US-based sellers are generally more expensive than ordering from China directly, but shipping is faster and cheaper if you're in the US.

I have had several fine Oolongs from The Cultured Cup over the last few years. One of the largest Mariage Frères retailers in the US, they also have a small selection of fine teas sourced elsewhere.

Recently I have been trying several wonderful Dan Cong Oolongs from Hou De Fine Teas. US-based. Pricey, but high quality.

I am putting together an order for jingteashop and will report on the Oolongs after they arrive. A recent sample from them that came in another order was very good. China-based. SAL shipping typically takes about 3 - 5 weeks.

What Oolong teas have you explored and enjoyed? Any tea vendors that have great Oolongs or good-deal everyday Oolongs you can rcommend to us?

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beside www.houdeasianarts.com

www.shanshuiteas.com and www.thefragrant leaf .com have some of the best of the best oolongs.

i have ordered from jingteashop but i have been disappointed-

which teas have u ordered from them

joanne

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beside www.houdeasianarts.com

www.shanshuiteas.com and www.thefragrant leaf .com have some of the best of the best oolongs.

i have ordered from  jingteashop but i have been disappointed-

which teas have u ordered from them

joanne

I have not ordered Oolongs from Jingteashop yet. I have only had the sample I mentioned in the What's in your tea cup today? topic, which I enjoyed. The sample came with an order of teaware.

Which Oolongs have you had from Jing that disappointed you?

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there r 2 shops

www.jingtea.com in uk

and www.jingteashop.com

i have ordered from both-

it has been awhile since i ordered tea from either-i can't remember the names of teas

but i have ordered glass teaware from jingtea.com(the items have arrived safely and r used frequently)

and also from jingteashop-

joanne


Edited by jpr54_ (log)

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I've ordered from South Silk Road and had good experiences.

http://www.southsilkroad.com/catalog/teas.php#oolong

I'm no expert in tea but i've ordered and enjoyed:

Cold Summit Tung Ting

http://www.southsilkroad.com/catalog/produ...products_id=335

and

Early Spring Mei Jia Wu Long Jing

http://www.southsilkroad.com/catalog/produ...products_id=346

and

Silver needle King

http://www.southsilkroad.com/catalog/produ...products_id=271

They also included a few small samples of four teas for free which i appreciated.

regards,

Brian


Yield to Temptation, It may never come your way again.

 --Lazarus Long

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I go to their tea shop occassionally-

the staff r friendly and helpful-they r also knowledgeable -i always have a good experience there-

joanne r.

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I love oolong tea, and it's popular as a cold bottled drink in Japan. My question is - how does it differ from other kinds of tea? Is it a black tea?

That's a great question. While not a black (or red) tea and not a green tea, the Oolongs have a wide range in between the two -- from the lighter (green) end to the darker, roasted end of the spectrum.

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I love oolong tea, and it's popular as a cold bottled drink in Japan. My question is - how does it differ from other kinds of tea? Is it a black tea?

I think brewed oolong tea is a vastly different product than the stuff in the bottle. (That goes for brewed green teas, too.)

One of my co-workers once brought in some peach-flavoured oolong tea that was quite nice. I'd never had a flavoured oolong tea, and didn't even know they existed!

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Hello- The family that owns the Chinese Tea House I frequent import their teas directly from China.They ship their teas all over. Contact them here.Lately, I have been drinking "4 Seasons of Spring Oolong" and "Honey Phoenix Oolong".


Edited by Naftal (log)

"As life's pleasures go, food is second only to sex.Except for salami and eggs...Now that's better than sex, but only if the salami is thickly sliced"--Alan King (1927-2004)

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2007 Winter Feng Huang Wu Dong

Old Bush Dan Cong Huang Jing

Medium-light wood hand roasting

35% Fermentation

Source: Hou de Fine Teas at http://www.houdeasianart.com/

This is the last of this Dan Cong in an order of three Dan Congs from Hou de last year. I brewed it gongfu style in a 130 ml Yixing with the last of these large, beautiful leaves (sorry no photos, but you can see them on the Hou de site). I heated the water to 195 f for the first three infusions and then 208 f for the last one, since I decided to end the session early.

This is is an intensley floral tea liquor with minimal astringency to start, and more infusion by infusion. It seemed to be a bit thinner than the last time I brewed it, which may be due to the leaf:water ratio. I would bump it up to 7.5 - 8.0 grams next time, that is, if I had a supply of leaf to do it with.

This is a little different than what people think of as the classic Dan Cong flavor profile, but very good on its own terms, and the leaf - both dry and wet - is worth the price of admission. I have never seen Dan Cong leaf like it, or more beautful.

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Just a brief note on this tie guan yin from norbutea.com that we used for the tea tasting discussion earlier this year. I went back to it today and brewed it in a Yixing tea pot instead of a gaiwan. With the gaiwan I felt that the tea was a little weaker than when I originally got it. But today in the 110 ml Yixing it was much better. The first infusion was barely okay, but the 2nd and 3rd were wonderfully floral, the 4th through 7th were slightly less intense but still very good, and the 8th I just drank showed a little more sweetness. This has a few more infusions left in it.

Hard to know what all accounts for the difference. The Yixing pot for sure. Curiously my leaf to water ratio was a litttle lower than I usually start at - a little less than 6 grams rather than 7.

I have come to like these greener tgy Oolongs a great deal, coming from a preference for the more traditional roasted versions.

Anyone else brewing tgy, green or roasted these days?

Anyone tried any of the Spring 2009 crop?

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My wife gave me the Tung Ting Jade Oolong from Teavana a while ago, and I was finally able to try it. It was delicious. Definitely on the floral, lightly sweet side of the spectrum. It took me a few cups to really appreciate it, as I'd gotten hooked on the much stronger Earl Grey Supreme from Harney and Sons. Also, I think I was brewing it wrong. In any case, when I want something light, with nice aromas and not too astringent, then it's the one I'll pick.

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Shu Gu Ping Oolong

from jingteashop.com

Harvesting : Early spring 2008 (pre Qing-Ming) - First Pick

Grade : AA

Origine : Feng Huang Mountain, Shi Gu Ping Town, Chao Zhou city, Guang Dong Province.

Plantation attitude : 650 meters above sea level.

Plantation varietals : Shui Xian variety.

Certification : Small production directly from local farmer.

This is an interesting tea, similar to a Dan Cong and probably difficult or impossible to find in the US. The description on the jingteashop.com site is very much what I found brewing it gongfu style in a tiny 55 ml gaiwan. The first infusion had a strong gardenia aroma and what they called oily and I called buttery mouthfeel. Indeed it did develope a balanced taste profile by the third infusion.

3.1 g leaf. Rinse 10, 1:20, 2: 15, 3: 20", 4: 15, 5: 20", 6: 30"...and more to go, maybe 12.

This package of tea came with an order last year and I opened it a few months ago. Still in great shape.

This is a very nice light Oolong, and worth exploring if you enjoy Dan Cong's.

Has any one else tried this tea?

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Hello- I had a Milk Oolong that was amazing. It really did taste like there was milk in it, even when there was no milk in it at all.


"As life's pleasures go, food is second only to sex.Except for salami and eggs...Now that's better than sex, but only if the salami is thickly sliced"--Alan King (1927-2004)

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What brewing method worked out well for you after experimenting?

I started with s.o.p.: water at a full rolling boil, then scalding a very large mug.

Waiting for the temp of the water to drop a bit (to around 200 degress) I added about 3 teaspoons to a chrome plated brass tea ball placed in the mug. The hot water was poured over the ball, and it was left undisturbed for a good 5 minutes. Finally, I bobbed the tea ball a few times and removed it.

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What brewing method worked out well for you after experimenting?

I started with s.o.p.: water at a full rolling boil, then scalding a very large mug.

Waiting for the temp of the water to drop a bit (to around 200 degress) I added about 3 teaspoons to a chrome plated brass tea ball placed in the mug. The hot water was poured over the ball, and it was left undisturbed for a good 5 minutes. Finally, I bobbed the tea ball a few times and removed it.

Have you tried using an infuser in your cup instead of a tea ball? I think you would find a big difference, since a tea ball restricts the tea leaves from opening up fully. You'll use less tea leaves, too, since they will be infusing the water more efficiently. And you should be able to get at least two or three infusions out of the leaves.

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One of those serendipitous discoveries today. More intuitive than thought out carefully. I tried brewing a 2005 Shui Xian that I got from Guang at Hou de. I have not been wild about this tea and thought that maybe it was just too old, after brewing it in a Yixing pot or two and a gaiwan.

Today it struck me that a little Yixing I had been using for raw Pu-erh may work better with this Oolong. The pot is about 90 ml in a traditional shi piao shape. Yellow in color, I am not sure what Yixing clay it is made from, but it is rather dense.

This pot worked wonders on the Shui Xian - less drying and sweeter. I'll have to experiment with the combination for a few sessions to be sure this isn't a fluke result and to see what works best, but this is a lesson re-learned: matching any Oolong to any Yixing is a trial and error process.

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