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NYC Foodies, Get Thee to New Jersey


Fat Guy
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Oh yeah LPS, you want IH

IH Rice Cooker

The heating method known as Induction Heating (IH) occurs when a magnetic material is placed in a magnetic field. In our case, coils within the bottom of the rice cooker create the magnetic field. When the special 2 ply inner cooking pan (nonstick coated aluminum with stainless steel outer lining) is placed into the rice cooker and the unit is turned on, a magnetic field is generated to create instant heat. Through this technology, the whole inner cooking pan itself becomes the heat source utilizing both high heat and finely tuned heat adjustments to control the cooking process. The results? Higher and quicker heat response that's more evenly distributed for perfectly cooked rice every time!

Great info, Raji...thanks! Although I couldn't make it out to NJ tonight, I did do our fellow Nipponophiles proud by eating not one, but TWO Japanese dinners back to back. First Aburiya Kinnosuke, then immediately off to Sakagura. Very full now...

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t]

Great info, Raji...thanks!  Although I couldn't make it out to NJ tonight, I did do our fellow Nipponophiles proud by eating not one, but TWO Japanese dinners back to back.  First Aburiya Kinnosuke, then immediately off to Sakagura.  Very full now...

LOL Sakagura's coat check gal just left my place early morning... we're friends and I was helping her drink her way through her jetlag.... good job on the BETSU-BARA (2nd stomach)

What's new at AK? I owe them a visit, haven't been there in a minute...

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t]

Great info, Raji...thanks!  Although I couldn't make it out to NJ tonight, I did do our fellow Nipponophiles proud by eating not one, but TWO Japanese dinners back to back.  First Aburiya Kinnosuke, then immediately off to Sakagura.  Very full now...

LOL Sakagura's coat check gal just left my place early morning... we're friends and I was helping her drink her way through her jetlag.... good job on the BETSU-BARA (2nd stomach)

What's new at AK? I owe them a visit, haven't been there in a minute...

Luckily, it's not cold out yet, so the coat check gal doesn't have to be on the top of her game. I love the term BETSU-BARA...will be using it a lot now.

Didn't note a lot new (other than a big shipment of Yebisu beer) at AK...went to revisit the "best of", such as two kinds of tsukune, octopus rice, various pork bits, etc.

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How about their humongous daily/weekly specials menu? That's always changing. Notice anything?? Ordering off of that is as good as putting together your own kaiseki....

We're getting a little OT here, but I definitely had the salmon collar (they were out of the hamachi kama) and the octopus rice off the specials menu. I'll list more if I think of them.

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Last night I had a pretty rough New Jersey experience, demonstrating some of the risks of travel to the Garden State. I was taking a reporter and a photographer to Moksha in Edison in an attempt to prove my point about the categorical superiority of New Jersey South Indian. Moksha performed admirably, however the traffic situation was insane.

I left my apartment on the Upper East Side at 6:30pm and fought my way into Midtown to pick up my traveling companions, then we dealt with traffic getting to and through the Lincoln Tunnel. Then, at the Turnpike tolls, there was a major accident -- police, fire, ambulances, tow-trucks, helicopter circling overhead -- right where all the cars enter the Turnpike. It created something on the order of an hour-long delay. We got to Moksha in Edison at 9pm.

Then, on the way back, the Turnpike was closed -- closed! -- just before the Lincoln Tunnel exit. So us and a lot of other irritated people were redirected to the Holland Tunnel along the 1/9 truck route. I dropped my passengers in two locations and got home around 1:30am.

The food was really good, though. And, happy ending: when I got home a guy was just pulling out of a parking space on my block on the good side.

Steven A. Shaw aka "Fat Guy"
Co-founder, Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, sshaw@egstaff.org
Proud signatory to the eG Ethics code
Director, New Media Studies, International Culinary Center (take my food-blogging course)

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Last night I had a pretty rough New Jersey experience, demonstrating some of the risks of travel to the Garden State. I was taking a reporter and a photographer to Moksha in Edison in an attempt to prove my point about the categorical superiority of New Jersey South Indian. Moksha performed admirably, however the traffic situation was insane.

I left my apartment on the Upper East Side at 6:30pm and fought my way into Midtown to pick up my traveling companions, then we dealt with traffic getting to and through the Lincoln Tunnel. Then, at the Turnpike tolls, there was a major accident -- police, fire, ambulances, tow-trucks, helicopter circling overhead -- right where all the cars enter the Turnpike. It created something on the order of an hour-long delay. We got to Moksha in Edison at 9pm.

Then, on the way back, the Turnpike was closed -- closed! -- just before the Lincoln Tunnel exit. So us and a lot of other irritated people were redirected to the Holland Tunnel along the 1/9 truck route. I dropped my passengers in two locations and got home around 1:30am.

The food was really good, though. And, happy ending: when I got home a guy was just pulling out of a parking space on my block on the good side.

You hit the nail on the head here for those from NYC venturing to NJ for a meal. It is not that there isn't good food to be had in NJ. Clearly there is. It is simply that the potential hassle factor is so high. It doesn't take getting burned too many times to limit one's interest in venturing away. Good thing you got that spot or you might still be out. :raz:

John Sconzo, M.D. aka "docsconz"

"Remember that a very good sardine is always preferable to a not that good lobster."

- Ferran Adria on eGullet 12/16/2004.

Docsconz - Musings on Food and Life

Slow Food Saratoga Region - Co-Founder

Twitter - @docsconz

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I guess it's also a question of temperament. There are people for whom that experience would have utterly ruined the evening and created a deterrent against ever venturing that far afield again. We were lucky to have a group that just used the time to gab and didn't wind up scarred by the delays. I've also resolved, for future weeknight ventures, to be more aggressive about pursuing the public-transportation alternatives.

Of course I've also spent hours trapped on New York City subways, sitting in Manhattan traffic, etc. But yes, the farther off the city grid you go the greater your risk of getting trapped.

Steven A. Shaw aka "Fat Guy"
Co-founder, Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, sshaw@egstaff.org
Proud signatory to the eG Ethics code
Director, New Media Studies, International Culinary Center (take my food-blogging course)

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that sounds like my last attempt at dinner in NYC....

send me good Car-ma for Halloween night

tracey

The great thing about barbeque is that when you get hungry 3 hours later....you can lick your fingers

Maxine

Avoid cutting yourself while slicing vegetables by getting someone else to hold them while you chop away.

"It is the government's fault, they've eaten everything."

My Webpage

garden state motorcyle association

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  • 4 weeks later...

A couple of friends and I went to Mitsuwa this weekend for the annual tuna cut. I learned a couple of things about myself:

1) There is such a thing as too much o-toro. I've never been in a financial position before to discover this, but now I know.

2) If you ever want the backbone from a 700-lb tuna, all you have to do is ask:

http://newyork.seriouseats.com/2008/11/spi...new-jersey.html

That spine easily weighed 40 pounds. We made a broth with some of the bones: not bad, but as I mentioned, we were a little tuna'd out after the sashimi.

---

al wang

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as someone who lives in NJ, works in NYC frequently...I can only really think of 1 reasons to ever come to NJ (for food). Not saying that NJ has bad restaurants (Nicholas is one that stands out for me), but there is always equivalent or better in NYC....except.

1. Delorenzo's pizza

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There is no equivalent in New York (or anywhere else) to the Newark Style Italian Hot Dog invented by Jimmy Buff's in 1932 and only available in a few N.J. counties. New Jersey also has more varieties and styles of hot dogs than New York, although New York is making strides. Crif Dogs is a pretty good knock off of Rutt's Hut. A former owner admitted that Crif's was patterned after Rutt's in order to bring the deep fried hot dog concept to New York. Not only are the dogs deep fried, but they are specially made for deep frying.

The Southern part of Jersey also produces some pretty good cheesesteaks according to even Philadelphia cheesesteak afficionados. There is White House subs, which serves a Philadelphia quality steak. Also Chick's deli which was named as best in the area one year by Philadelphia magazine. And Gaetano's. New York, even with Tony Luke's (which I've heard is far inferior to it's Philadelphia namesake) can't come close.

John the hot dog guy

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