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Found 568 results

  1. I am looking for a roadside shack type place with a lot of rustic charm which makes great jambalaya or gumbo to shoot a short video at. Must be within short driving distance from New Orleans since we'll be there shooting other stuff. Any ideas please???
  2. Okay, I've been seen a lot of tomato jam type recipes lately and have made a compote and bought a jam. They were both so sweet, but also a little savory and the tomato taste is still very much present. At a loss as to what to do with them. The only thing I can come up with is maybe as part of a cheese plate or as a cheaper version, served with some cream cheese and crackers. To me its too sweet to serve as a type of chutney with meat, but too tomatoey to put on toast. Hmmm... is it just me or is there something else to use it for?
  3. Raw tomatoes are available in plenty these days.This chutney is ideal as an accompaniment for chapathis or rotis and can be prepared ahead of time and stored in the refrigerator.the ingredients needed are: raw tomatoes -1/2kg, sesame seeds- 1 1/2 tbsp, green chillies- 4 or 5, salt and curry leaves.For the seasoning:oil ,mustard seeds,turmeric powder and asafoetida. Wash and cut the tomatoes into pieces and keep aside. Roast the sesame seeds till light brown in colour and keep aside.Heat oil in a kadai and at first roast the green chillies and curry leaves and keep aside.Then add tomatoes to it and let cook till tender.When cooked allow to cool and grind all the ingredients together with a little salt.The chutney is ready Add the seasoning and serve.
  4. Pumpkin Preserves These things are delicious. They're made the same way Eggplant Preserves are made. We used the lighter colored flesh of white pumpkins so that the end product is not too dark. Peel and cut pumpkin into small pieces and soak overnight in a solution of water and pickling lime. Use 1 cup lime per liter of water. Make enough to cover the pumpkin pieces. Use a plate to keep them submerged. Recommended pickling lime, can be found at Kroger. Rinse the pumpkin pieces thoroughly two to three times. Squeeze every piece by hand to get rid of excess moisture. In a pot, add 1 kilo water (1 liter), 1 kilo sugar, 1 T lemon juice and 5 Cloves for every kilo of pumpkin. Bring the syrup to a simmer then add the pumpkin. Simmer for 2.5 hours. Let cool and place in jars, distribute syrup evenly among them.
  5. Last night's balmy skies graced our cocktail hour in the garden of the James Beard House. Apparently there are a lot of Bordeaux Wine Lovers a bout since this sold out event was subscribed by a diverse age group. The only 'difficult' part of the evening was making one's way past the swarm of staff from The Highlawn Pavilion & Manor who were hard at work in the petite kitchen to make each plate picture perfect. The appetizerrs [Frogs Legs w. black garlic, Spoons of Lobster w. mango, shots of spring pea soup w. jamon froth, wagu beef w. leeks and FG torchon] lept off the plates. Perhaps it was the Perrier-Jouet that helped them slide down? As Chef Mitchell Altholz slaved away in the kitchen ad the Knowles dynasty kept a laid back but watchful eye, the rest of us enjoyed this multi-course meal that began w. a plate of assorted crudo and ended with desserts typical of Bordeaux. An oil poached halibut, pheasant w foie gras & truffle & beef w. Bordeaux & blue cheese filled the gap between first and last courses. Michael Giulini of Deutsch & Sons supplied some excellent wines from Chateau Bonnet Rose to Ch Coucheroy Blanc to a Margaux, and a St Emilion. Surely the spirit of James Beard was hovering overhead on this wonderful evening...and me, I was the luckiest, as I got to enjoy all of it!
  6. Tamarind chutney (Imlee kee chutney) Tamarind makes a sweet and sour chutney with the consistency of hot fudge sauce. It's an important element in the street- and snack-foods of northern India. Suvir Saran 1 T canola oil 1 tsp cumin seeds 1 tsp ground ginger 1/2 tsp cayenne pepper 1/2 tsp fennel seeds 1/2 tsp asafetida 1/2 tsp garam masala 2 c water 1-1/4 c sugar 3 T tamarind concentrate Combine the oil and the spices in a medium saucepan over medium-high heat and cook, stirring, 1 minute Add the water, the sugar and the tamarind concentrate. Bring to a boil, turn the heat down and simmer until it turns a chocolaty brown color and is thick enough to coat the back of the spoon, 20 to 30 minutes. (While still warm, it will look like a thin chocolate sauce and it will thicken a bit as it cools.) Makes about 1 1/4 cups. Keywords: Easy, Condiment, Indian, The Daily Gullet ( RG181 )
  7. Thai Basil Pepper Jelly This is good as: an appetizer when spread over cream cheese or goat cheese and served with crackers or toasted bread rounds or a condiment with pork or lamb (or even chicken!). This recipe is adapted from one called "Walt's Habanero Jelly" which can be found in various places on the net including "recipesource.com". 2 c chopped red and yellow bell pepper 1 c fresh thai basil leaves 1-1/2 c vinegar (1/2 & 1/2) rice wine and cider 5 c sugar 1 T lime or lemon juice 5 habanero chiles (orange and/or red) 1 tsp butter 1 pkg pectin (powder, sure-jell) Prepare jelly jars according to directions (wash w/ hot soapy water, sterilize lids by pouring boiling water over). I like to use the little 1/2 cup jars. Seed and stem bell peppers, chop finely CAREFULLY seed and stem habanero peppers (I highly recommend you wear a mask and gloves when you do this...these are the most toxic things I have worked with outside the lab!). Chop finely (I use a small food processor/chopper for this). Measure sugar into a bowl. Place the chiles, bell peppers, dry pectin, vinegar and butter in a large stainless steel pot. Bring to a rolling boil, stirring constantly. Add sugar immediately, return to a rolling boil and boil exactly one minute. Remove from heat and fill prepared jelly jars. Wipe rims with damp cloth, cover with lid and screw on bands tightly. Invert for 5 minutes then turn over and let cool slowly. After jars are cool check seals by pressing top of jars. If lid springs up, jar is not sealed (But can be kept in fridge!). I shake these occasionally as they cool to distribute the peppers so it looks nice. Tastes just as good if you don't and just stir before serving. ;-) Variations: You can use from 5-15 habaneros, depending on how much heat you want! I usually use about 10. I have made rosemary by subbing about 1/4-1/2 cups of chopped rosemary leaves. You might want to use all cider vinegar for that version. Keywords: Hot and Spicy, Easy, Appetizer, Condiment ( RG1106 )
  8. Nuka-zuke Ricebran pickles Bags of dry seasoned nuka-doko (ricebran pickling bed) mix are available, and vary in quality. Boxes of ready matured wet mixes are usually better quality. It isn't hard to make your own, but it takes a week or two (depending on temperature/season) to mature. It's easiest to start in spring, when temperatures are warm but not hot, and the pickle bed matures just as the first summer vegetables become available. Pickling bed 2 kg rice bran 300 g coarse natural salt (15% of weight of ricebran) 2 l water, boiled and cooled (roughly equal weight with ricebran) Additives strip of dried kelp, wiped clean 10 dried chile peppers (adjust to taste) 3 pickled sansho berries Japanese type not Chinese Dry ground mustard, a handful, slows fermentation Vegetables to pickle eggplants, halved or quarted whole cucumbers bell peppers chunks of cabbage daikon (Japanese radish) in quarters carrot sticks Boil water and allow to cool. You can boil the salt with the water if you like. Use fresh ricebran, and use as soon as possible after purchase so that the oils do not become rancid. Some people like to dry-roast the ricebran over a gentle heat in a wok, stirring constantly. Allow to cool to room temperature. Mix water, salt, and rice bran. Add enough water so that the mixture forms a ball when squeezed, but remains loose and crumbly in the bowl. Additives can be added now or after maturing for a couple of weeks. Transfer bran mixture to a lidded container, and press some vegetables into the pickle bed. As long as they are clean, almost anything will do at this stage -- the first round or two of pickles are normally thrown out. Set container aside in a fairly dark, cool, place. You MUST mix thoroughly every day, up to 3 times daily in hot weather. If this is impossible, move the pickle bed to a plastic bag and "hibernate" it in the fridge. I suspect it would freeze OK, but have not tried it. Vegetables are ready when soft (or for carrot, when somewhat soft). Always take pickled veg out, wash or wipe clean, and store in the refrigerator if not wanted immediately - old pickles will quickly invite bad bacteria or excessive sourness. If you pickle a lot of watery vegetables such as cucumbers, remember that the pickle bed is losing salt, and as salt levels drop, fermentation and lactic acids will increase. Add a sprinkle of salt and dry mustard every time you remove vegetables in this case, and add more rice bran (and proportional amount of salt) if the bed becomes sloppy. You can drain off excess liquid, but this tends to affect the flavor of the pickle bed. Don't overdo the mustard - pickles should not taste bitter or hot. Keywords: Japanese ( RG1089 )
  9. Chevre & Apple Chutney Roll Serves 8 as Appetizer. The chutney part of the recipe (adapted from a recipe in a November 1996 “Bon Appétit” magazine) makes approximately 3 cups of chutney which is more than is needed for the roll. However, the chutney is excellent as a condiment and we never have a difficult time using up the "extra". The chutney is best if made at least one day before using so the flavors can mellow. Use golden raisins for a light-colored chutney and dark raisins for a dark chutney. Also, other dried fruits (prunes, apricots, etc.) can be substituted for the raisins as variations to the basic recipe. Chutney 1-1/2 c apple cider vinegar 2 c sugar 1-1/2 lb tart apples, peeled, cored, chopped into 1/2-inch pieces 10 large garlic cloves, minced 2 oz fresh ginger, peeled, minced 1-1/2 tsp salt 1 tsp dried crushed red pepper 1-1/2 c (packed) raisins, coarsely chopped 2 T yellow or brown (or a mixture of the two) mustard seeds Roll 12 oz chevre, at room temperature 1/2 c apple chutney (from above), cooled or chilled Bring the vinegar and sugar to a boil in a saucepan, stirring until the sugar dissolves. Simmer for 10 minutes. Add the minced garlic and stir. Mix in the remaining chutney ingredients (but not the chevre!). Simmer until the apples are tender and the chutney thickens, stirring occasionally while it cooks. 45-60 minutes. Cool chutney and chill until used. Pat the softened chevre onto a sheet of plastic wrap in a rough rectangular shape. Cover with another sheet of plastic wrap and roll (or pat) into a 1/4"-thick rectangle. Peel off the top sheet of plastic and spread the chevre with a thin layer of chutney. Use the bottom sheet of plastic wrap to help roll the chutney covered chevre, along the long side of the rectangle, into a tight roll. Or, you can line a small loaf pan or other mold with plastic wrap and spread alternating layers of chevre and chutney inside the mold, packing each layer firmly,starting and ending with chevre. Unmold onto a serving plate and peel off the plastic. Chill if not serving immediately (roll can be made up to one day beforehand) and bring to room temperature before serving with crackers or bread. Keywords: Hors d'oeuvre, Vegetarian, Condiment, Appetizer, Easy, Cheese, Snack ( RG1046 )
  10. Shorshe bate Macch – Mustard Fish This recipe is from The Beginner's Guide to Regional Indian Cooking in th eCGI ¼ cup black mustard seeds ¼ cup white mustard seeds A touch of garlic (Not traditional but the Chef loves it so we added it!) 4 fillets white fish (small Tilapia fillets) 1 tsp turmeric salt to taste Mustard oil to panfry the fish 2 Serrano green chilies, slit Soak mustard seeds (I use 50% black and 50% white) in water for 10-15 minutes. In a blender, grind mustard seeds and garlic with enough water. Start with a relatively less water and slowly keep adding water as needed. The final consistency will be a bit more liquid than Dijon mustard. Make sure that there are no whole seeds left over. In my blender, this process takes about 10 minutes. This will be your gravy. Don't forget to add a bit of salt and mix some more. Set aside. Marinate fish fillets with the turmeric and the salt. Heat a shallow pan with a little bit of mustard oil, over medium high heat. When oil starts to smoke, add in the fish pieces so they are in a single layer. After a minute or so, turn them over, and cook until brown. Remove from heat. In the same oil add the mustard paste. Add some slit green chilies for some heat. Cook the mustard paste until it starts boiling and then add the fish. Simmer for another 3 – 5 minutes. Serve hot. Keywords: Main Dish, Fish, Indian, eGCI ( RG884 )
  11. Green Tomato Jam Makes about 8 3/4 cups of jam; about ten 1-cup (8 ounce) jars. This recipe is adapted from the General Foods Consumer Center. 1-3/4 lb green tomatoes 1/2 c lemon juice 7-1/2 c sugar (3-1/4 pounds) 2 pkg (pouches) fruit pectin jell Wash the tomatoes. Grind, and measure 3 cups of tomatoes into a 6- to 8-quart nonreactive pot. Add the lemon juice. Add the sugar and mix thoroughly. Place over high heat and bring to a boil, stirring constantly. As soon as it reaches a boil, stir in the pectin. Bring to a full rolling boil, and boil hard for 1 minute, stirring constantly. Remove from heat. Skim off any foam. Ladle immediately into hot, sterilized canning jars, filling to within 1/8 inch of the top. Wipe the rims and threads of the jars. Cover the jars with 2-piece lids and screw the bands tightly. Invert the jars for 5 minutes, then turn upright. Let cool for 1 hour, then check seals. Variation: I added some finely minced lemongrass and very finely julienned lime leaf, for a little more "exotic" flavor. Keywords: Intermediate, Vegetables, Condiment ( RG731 )
  12. Next week I will be volunteering at the James Beard house as a student chef. I figured that this will be a good opportunity to get in a little practice and learn some new techniques. I was told that the typical work will be prep and maybe some plating. My main concern is that I studied baking and pastry in culinary school. I was not taught knife skills, meat fab, etc... that I might have to do. The volunteer coordinator at the James Beard Foundation assured me that I will be able to be of use. Given that i am paying approx $35 round trip train ticket from New Haven, CT to volunteer, I want to make sure that i will be of service. What do you think? Thanks, Dan
  13. On a recent visit to North Carolina I had a great cocktail called a "Hot Date." It was made with jujube preserves (Chinese red dates?) and I've been looking for them ever since--and on line--to no avail. Can someone help with a NYC or mail order source?
  14. I am canning pickles today and would like to do some with asian flavors. I have in mind to add a few drops of sesame oil for flavor to one of my brines. Is this O.K. or will the oil throw off the preserving factor?
  15. I live in the Baltimore/DC area which means that I have access to some great Peruvian chicken places. Whenever I get the chicken I am usually served a green and yellow sauce. I know how to make the green one (easy enough), but it is the yellow one that I am more concerned about. I searched high and low (even on chowhound, google, etc.) and didn't even find anything remotely close. I know it has mayo in it, maybe mustard, and maybe aji amarillo sauce. I found a bunch of recipes for something similar that involves feta cheese but I don't think that is even in the sauce. I recently started going to this new place in College Park, MD called Sardi's Pollo a la Brasa. This place is different from all the rest, because it serves an additional white sauce on the side. Wish I knew what that was too, but the yellow sauce is more important. Figured I'd post this on this board instead of the South American one because this one gets the most action (:
  16. The Maille produced in France is reportedly a far superior product to the one produced in Canada, and I'm having a hard time finding it. Kalustyan's lists Maille Dijon Originale "product of France," but upon arrival it turned out to be the same Canadian product that I can buy in my grocery.
  17. ANDIE'S ABSOLUTELY ADDICTING BREAD & BUTTER PICKLES Here’s the thing about pickles: if you’ve never made them, they may seem to be an overwhelming (and possibly mysterious) project. Our listener Andie – who has offered some really valuable help to the show several times in the past – has sent this recipe which provides an opportunity to “try your hand” at pickle-making without much effort. Andie suggests that making a small batch, and storing the pickles in the refrigerator (without “processing”) can get you started painlessly. Our Producer Lisa says that the result is so delicious that you won’t be able to keep these pickles on hand - even for the 3-4 months that they’ll safely keep! The basics are slicing the cucumbers and other veggies, tossing them with salt and crushed ice and allowing them to stand for awhile to become extra-crisp. You then make a simple, sweet and spicy syrup, (Andie does this in the microwave), rinse your crisp veggies, put them in a jar, pour the syrup over, and keep them in the refrigerator until they’re “pickled” – turning the jar upside down each day. In about 2 weeks you’ll have pickles – now how much easier could that be? If you are inspired, I hope you’ll try these – and enjoy! MAKES ABOUT 1 QUART. FOR THE PICKLES: 4 to 6 pickling cucumbers (cucumbers should be not much larger than 1 inch in diameter, and 4 to 5 inches long) 1/2 to 3/4 of one, medium size onion. 1/2 red bell pepper. 1/4 cup, pickling salt (coarse kosher salt) 2 quarts, cracked ice water to cover 2 tablespoons, mustard seed. 1 heaping teaspoon, celery seed FOR THE SYRUP: 1 1/2 cups, vinegar *NOTE: Use cider or distilled white vinegar, do not use wine vinegar. 1 1/2 cups, sugar 2 heaping teaspoons, pickling spice mix. PREPARE THE PICKLES: Carefully wash the cucumbers and bell pepper. Slice all vegetables very thin, using a food processor with a narrow slicing blade, or by hand, or using a V-slicer or mandoline. Toss the sliced vegetables together in a glass or crockery bowl large enough to hold twice the volume of the vegetables. Sprinkle the salt over the vegetables, add the cracked ice, toss again to blend all ingredients and add water to just barely cover the vegetables. Place a heavy plate on top of the vegetables to keep them below the top of the liquid. *Set aside for 4 hours. PREPARE THE SYRUP: Place the vinegar, sugar and pickling spices in a 4-quart Pyrex or other microwavable container (the large Pyrex measure works very well) Microwave on high for 15 to 20 minutes. [if a microwave is not available, simmer the syrup in a narrow saucepan on the stovetop, over low heat, for the same length of time.] Allow the syrup to cool. Strain the syrup and discard the spices. ASSEMBLE THE PICKLES: Place one wide-mouth quart canning jar (or two wide-mouth pint jars) with their lids in a pot of water to cover, place over medium heat and bring the water to a simmer (180 degrees). Remove the pot from the heat and allow jar(s) and lid(s) to remain in the hot water until needed. *After the 4 hours are up (crisping the vegetables as described above) pour the vegetables into a large colander and rinse well. The cucumber slices should taste only slightly salty. Return the rinsed vegetables to the bowl, add the mustard seeds and celery seeds and toss well until evenly distributed. Set aside. Return the syrup to the microwave, microwave on high for 8 to 10 minutes [or heat the syrup on the stovetop] until an instant read thermometer shows the temperature of the syrup is 190 to 200 degrees. Place the vegetables into one wide-mouth quart jar, or in 2 wide-mouth pint jars that have been scalded as described above. Pour the syrup over the vegetables, place the lids on the jar or jars, tighten well and place in the refrigerator overnight. The following day, turn the jar upside down - then continue to turn every day for 2 weeks. (This is to insure that the pickles are evenly flavored) After 2 weeks open the jar and taste. The pickles should be ready to eat. Pickles will keep in the refrigerator for 3 to 4 months. ( RG2154 )
  18. Honey-Mustard Rotini with Chicken Serves 8 as Main Dish. This is a standby disk that I make whenever I can't decide what else to make. I've made variations with basil in lieu of or in addition to the parsley, adding heavy cream, sour cream or yogurt, adding sun-dried tomatoes, whatever, but at it's base it's a simple, inexpensive, filling dinner. 1 lb Chicken thighs, boned & skins removed, cut into bite-size pieces 1 medium onion, chopped 2 T minced or pressed fresh garlic 1 T olive oil 1/2 c your favorite prepared mustard 1/4 c olive oil 1/4 c honey 1/2 c toasted pine nuts 2 T minced fresh parsley 1/2 c freshly grated Parmesan or other fragrant hard cheese 1 lb rotini or other bite-size pasta, cooked 1. In a skillet, saute chicken, onion & half of garlic in 1 T olive oil until chicken is just cooked. 2. In a bowl, whisk together mustard, 1/4 C olive oil and honey until fully combined. Add pine nuts, parsley, cheese, and chicken mixture; stir to combine. 3. Stir mixture into hot pasta and serve, topping with additional cheese. Keywords: Main Dish, Easy, Chicken, Dinner ( RG2055 )
  19. Green Tomato Chutney Adapted from Bulletin 21 "Home Preservation of Fruit and Vegetables", Her Majesty's Stationary Office, first published 1929 You can adapt this for any garden surplus: apples, marrow, plums etc. Liquidised and sieved you can use it as the basis for a brown (steak) sauce. The long slow cooking and maturing gives a mellow dark brown chutney. The basic ingredients should be cut up and cooked so that the result is not completely smooth, but nothing is directly recognisable. Raisins, small cubes of crytallised ginger etc may be added to give character. 8 lb Green tomatoes 2 lb Apples 1 lb Raisins 2-1/2 lb Onions 2 chillis (more if you like it hotter) 1 oz Ginger 1 oz Salt 2 lb Brown sugar 2 pt Vinegar Cut up the tomatoes, peel and chop the onions and apples. Chop the raisins if they are large. Chop up the giner and the chillis, and tie them in a piece of muslin Place everything in a large pan, bring to the boil and simmer slowly until the desired consistency - about 8 hours. Remove the bag of spices and bottle in preserving jars (canning jars) while hot. Leave for a month or more in a dark cupboard. Keywords: Condiment ( RG1416 )
  20. Joe's Jambalaya Serves 4 as Main Dish. When most people think of Jambalaya, they generally think of a dish that includes rice, tomatoes, and various meats. This recipe is different -- a modern interpretation of an old favorite -- because it follows a more northern Louisiana tradition and omits the tomatoes. I think it makes the dish more elegant and subtle. It refridgerates reasonably well, and I like to serve it with a simple Italian country loaf of bread. It's a fairly flexible recipe, so feel free to experiment. 1 whole chicken breast 2 links of andouille sausage 1 c shrimp or other seafood (optional) 1 c long grain white rice 1 c water 1 c dry white wine 1 c chicken stock (preferably homemade) 1 large red bell pepper 2 ribs of celery 1 hot pepper of your choice (optional) 1 tsp Tabasco (or more) 2 T unsalted butter T fresh Italian parsley 1 tsp dried thyme salt and pepper to taste Dice the chicken breast into 1 inch cubes. Salt and pepper the chicken to taste. Heat a large dutch oven over a medium flame. Add the butter, and when it begins to foam, at the chicken to the pot. Brown slightly, but be sure not to over cook. Add the bell peppers and celery, coarsely diced, and stir for a minute. Then add the rice. While your performing the above tasks, bring the wine, water and stock to a bare boil in another pot. Add the liquid mixture to the dutch oven, along with the thyme, tabasco, and parsley. Add the sausage, cut into 1/4 inch slices to the same pot. If desired add a diced jalapeno, habanero, thai pepper, or whatever. Simmmer covered for 20-25 minutes or until the rice is softened but not pastey. If desired you can add shrimp or other seafood a few minutes before serving. Careful not to overcook the seafood. Taste and add additional salt if needed. Garnish with choped fresh parsley sprigs. Keywords: Main Dish, Easy, Chicken, Dinner, Hot and Spicy, American, Lunch, Pork, Fish, Rice ( RG1225 )
  21. Honey Fig Jam 1 pt figs 1 c honey 1 tsp cinnamon 1 tsp all spice 1/4 tsp salt 1 tsp ginger, freshly grated 1 lemon or small orange, finely grated zest and juice Wash, remove the stem and blossom end of figs, cut in quarters. Put in heavy bottomed pot with the rest of the ingredients. Bring to a slow simmer, cover and cook for 1 hour. Remove lid, remove figs with a spoon to a food mill fitted with large holed disk. Pass fruit through back into pot, discard skin left in the food mill. Stir pulp into liquid. Simmer for another 10 minutes or so then place into clean jar and store in the fridge. Yields about 1 cup. Keywords: Fruit, Dessert, Vegetarian, Intermediate, Breakfast, Topping/Frosting ( RG1156 )
  22. Tataki Kyuuri no Shouga-zuke ( Cucumber pickles with Ginger) Serves 4 as Side. These are a simple cucumber pickle that only need a couple minutes to marinate. Tataki is from the verb to hit or strike and they are called this because the cucumbers (kyuuri) are slightly smashed before marinating in the ginger (shouga) dressing. Try to use Japanese cucumbers if possible, if they are not available then use seedless ones. 3 Japanese cucmbers 1 T grated ginger 1/2 T rice vinegar 3 T soy sauce large pinch of sugar 1. Cut the cucumbers lengthwise into quarters, then cut them in 2 to 3 inch lengths. 2. Place them into a ziploc bag and slightly crush them with the bottom of a pan, you don't want to smash them to a pulp rather you want to just open them up a little so they can marinate faster. Some will be broken. 3 Add the rest of the ingredients to the bag and masssage it gently to mix the ingredients. 4. Let it sit for about 5 minutes then serve. Keywords: Appetizer, Japanese, Side, Vegan, Easy ( RG1041 )
  23. Inner Beauty Hot Sauce Knock-Off This is a knock-off version of Chris Schlesinger's legendary Inner Beauty Hot Sauce, the last bottle of which is the subject of a topic here. This version is based on perusal of the ingredients list and on the recipe in Big Flavors Of The Hot Sun by Chris Schlesinger and John Willoughby. However, that recipe is uncooked, whereas this one is cooked. I've fiddled around with this pretty extensively and like the balance, which resembles closely, to my tongue, that of the original. You can do the same. For example, some of the ingredients that were on-hand in my house (the palm vinegar, say) might not be in yours, and those could easily be substituted. You also might want to add other ingredients -- pineapple juice, say, or ground cloves -- to tweak it. Make it yours. Inner Beauty is fantastic with fried chicken or fish, dashed into collards, and as a jerk-like marinade base with citrus (orange and lime work well) for just about anything. 15 habanero chiles 1 mango 1 c yellow mustard 1/2 c brown sugar 1/2 c white vinegar 1/2 c palm vinegar 1 T curry powder 1 T cumin 1 tsp cinnamon 1 tsp allspice 1 T ancho chile powder 3 T salt (or to taste) 1 T black pepper 1/4 c molasses Seed and devein the chiles with gloves on, and tear them into smallish bits. Peel the mango and slice it into chunks -- size and shape don't matter, since you'll be blending it. Add the rest of the ingredients in a sauce pan. Bring the mixture to simmer over medium heat, turn it down to low, and simmer it for an hour or two, stirring now and then. Add water to keep it from scorching. The sauce is done cooking when the mango and chile flesh easily disintegrate under light pressure from your spoon or spatula. Blend with an immersion blender (or, when cool, in a blender) until the sauce is smooth. Keywords: Easy, Condiment, Hot and Spicy, Sauce ( RG2025 )
  24. spicy pineapple/rhubarb chutney i love chutneys with all kinds of meat, fish and even simple chutney sandwiches, as Monica Bhide suggests in Everything Indian. thanks, snowangel, for suggesting this one i concocted would be good with a sharp cheddar grilled cheese sandwich; it is. this is especially good also with pork, chicken and salmon. makes one pint chutney. 2-1/2 c rhubarb, diced 1/2 inch 1 c unsweetened pineapple, sliced and chopped 1/4 c golden raisins 1/4 c cider vinegar 3/4 c sugar 2 T ginger, minced 1/4 tsp ground cloves 1/4 tsp curry powder 1/4 tsp ground cardamom 1 tsp hot thai chile flakes 2 garlic cloves, minced 1 T grapeseed oil 1/2 tsp kosher salt mix fruits with sugar and vinegar. allow to set for about an hour to extract juices and soften raisins. stir in spices, oil and salt. i wanted to try out the jam setting on my kneadful thing and did so. that was great, no muss, no stirring. otherwise i would have cooked this on medium low heat for about 30 to 45 minutes (depending on preference), stirring as needed to keep it from sticking. store in jar in fridge up to two months. Keywords: Condiment, Fruit, Easy, Hot and Spicy ( RG1975 )
  25. Jelly Roll Sponge I 200 g eggs 120 g caster (superfine) sugar 125 g cake flour 1/2 tsp baking powder 40 g oil sift flour and baking powder together twice whisk egg whites till foamy, and gradually add the sugar. at soft peaks, add the yolks gradually and continue whisking to ribbon stage fold in the dry ingredients, followed by the oil pour into 28cm x 36cm (11 x 14 inch) or 25 x 36cm (10 x 14 inch) swiss roll pan bake at 200C (ummm... I think that's about 400F??) for about 8-10 minutes, depending on oven. Do not overbake. unmould immediately onto a wire rack once cool, spread with filling and roll up Keywords: Dessert, Cake ( RG1810 )
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