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alanjesq

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    http://Www.steinberglaw.com. Www.Culpeppers.com

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    St. Louis, Missouri
  1. alanjesq

    Combo Steam and Convection Oven

    I just bought one today. Will be putting it through its paces soon. Replaced a Sharp Steam oven that I have owned for about five years. We shall see. alanjesq
  2. I have a thanks too. I have just finished reading all volumes of MC. Just outstanding. alanjesq
  3. I have been reading MC bypassing the Kitchen Manual until today. I just noticed that my Kitchen Manual table of contents begins with Roman V. Chapter 8???? Can anyone suggest how I can bring this to the attention of the "powers that be" so that I can obtain what I believe should be an index starting at the beginning of the books. I am up to Volume 4, and just having the best time. alanjesq PS: if someone with a full index can tell me where the list of "stuff" for Pressure Cooker Beef Stock or Brown Stock is located, I would be greatful. I want to make PC stock today.
  4. alanjesq

    Best Ways to Cook Bacon

    This method works great for regularly sliced bacon but I find it makes shoe leather out of the thicker stuff. No way! This is a huge waste - no drippings for use in various applications, such as cornbread and flavoring green beans &etc. I will stick to my old fashioned method which gives me both the bacon and the drippings. Double "No Way". My great Dane would eat my face if I did not pour the fat over his kibble. Gives him great dog breath too.
  5. alanjesq

    Pressure Cookers – what's cooking?

    Where does one buy calcium chloride, as above? alanjesq
  6. alanjesq

    Eye of the Round treatment

    I have never been a fan of "eye of the round". Tasteless, lean to dry, flavorless. Yet, I was wondering how eye of the round would fare SV. After a two day cook at 131f, I can tell you it will be fed to our three dogs. Makes paste taste good. I seasoned with salt and pepper with light Rosemerry. I wasn't expecting much from this 3 pound cheap cut of meat, but I received less. Any comments. Result: lean, mush, paste like texture. Surprisingly, it was not dry, thanks, I guess to the SV bag. Would like to know if anyone had success with this product??? alanjesq
  7. Just finished Vol I. Again, I say "wow, wow and double wow" So on point, so focused and so filled with info. Even some of the sidebars that I could care less about, I care about. Go figure. Staggering. I can see where the series can be like a drug: "Everybody out of the room, and don't come back for a year or so" Worth every penny. Thanks MC alanjesq
  8. "seal in the juices" That is the one that gets me. It doesn't. Not unless you add a dab of Super Glue.
  9. alanjesq

    Exploring Mexican Soups

    Any chance of someone posting an authentic Menudo Soup Recipe? alanjesq
  10. What do you use for casing? I remember when we made it we used synthetic casings -- the turkey skin seems like a better option. It would add flavour that synthetic casings obviously wouldn't. I purchase Beef casings which are sold on line by various sausage maker supply houses. www.sausage maker.com, for example. The recipe for Kishka is so simple, but the implementation is sooooooooo difficult, unless you know the unwritten ins and outs which I will write soon. Many of the recipes say "boil" the stuffed kishka for X time. Try boiling and you will have exploded the Kishka all over your pot. Stuff the Kishka, sure, but unless you leave room for expansion---Poof, all over your pot. No recipe I have ever read instructs one to have a needle at the ready to pop the aneurisms, as they appear, or "all over your pot. Or, start the cook in cold water, or----see what I mean. Each of those "all over the pot" moments have happened to me, until I said "I am mad as hell, and I am not going to take it any more!!!". I then started making Kishka in earnest over a weekend, and did not stop until I got it right. I will post soon. alanjesq
  11. Hello everyone. I have just stumbled on this string, though I have been an e gullet member for a year of so.If this post is too verbose, I hope the editor will edit or delete. I am a home cook, 70 years old who hosts Passover yearly for the family. For years I have made the Matzo Ball Soup, Gefilta Fish, Schmaltz Herring, Chopped Liver, Kishka, Brisket, Salmon, Chrain (horseradish, both red and white) while my wife handles the sweet side of the menu, i.e. Charoset, Kugels, all sweet, and such. We both fight as to who will make the Matzo Balls and the Soup. This year, I conducted extensive research pertaining to Kishka, which for years has been hit and miss. Now after using tempreture probes, and making notes, and about 15 or so "cooks", many of which ended in disaster, I set out a batch that was consumed. I plan to publish the recipe somewhere on e gullet soon. I can tell you there are no recepies out there that I could find that is right on for Kishka. Pam: After reading your e gullet comments, I wonder if you make Kishka?? The Schmaltz herring is another recipe I am considering publishing in memory of the gentleman that gave it to me many years ago. You will like it or hate it. No one in my immediate family is interested in the tradition of the ethnic foods, and I am determined not to let this go into the ether alanjesq
  12. alanjesq

    Rethinking the prep of a whole turkey

    The only suggestion I have is to Brine it. We do that with the 59 cent per pound holiday turkeys sold at Xmas and Thanksgiving, that we freeze and use later in the year. I don't buy Butterballs any more. When cooking, I personally suggest separating the white meat from the dark meat and cook accordingly, but that is just me. I no longer cook turkeys whole, though brining provides a wider window of forgiveness as to doneness. alanjesq
  13. alanjesq

    Making Schmaltz ...

    Find as much yellow chicken fat as you can find from any source, (Oriental stores sell chunk Chicken Fat, like american butchers sell suet) including, whole chickens, but preferably, old stewing hens, and cut into manageable pieces (size of marbles) and heat on a low fire (cast iron recommended) or low if using electric and just wait . When the fat chunks don't give up any more liquid, you are done. You have made Schmaltz. Drain off the liquid and refrigerate. Incidently, when you make Chicken Soup, skim off the fat that accumulates on top after cooling and save that too. It contains a bit more liquid, but can be used. alanjesq
  14. alanjesq

    Best Ways to Cook Bacon

    I too, use a cast iron griddle. But in order to prevent curling, I have an identical cast iron griddle that I place on top as a press. The curve of the top griddle fits right over the curve of the pan upon which the bacon frys. Works very well. alanjesq
  15. I have a question about the Kitchen Manual. My kitchen manual does not lie square. The first few pages, perhaps 10 or so, are out of kilter. Now, I am not a perfectionist, but having said that, I am just curious as to why this is happening on a ring binder? Is there a fix. Believe me when I say, this will not keep me up at nights. The Books, and I am only 50% through Volume One are just awesome. In my 70 years, I have never seen anything like them. alanjesq
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