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liuzhou

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Everything posted by liuzhou

  1. I've seen a mother and daughter literally come to blows over fish eyes. Pig snouts are so commonplace I don't really notice them any more.
  2. Well if you insist. I'm not at home now, but I'll be back tomorrow. Gives you time to brace yourself! But you may have opened the floodgates for things you wouldn't believe (well, you might believe, but perhaps not want to see!) My local market is nothing if not interesting. The eye. That's why I"ve always hated the 'nose to tail' expression.There are all sorts of things happening before the nose.
  3. There is one stall in my local market which only seems to sell pigs' eyes. I do have a photo, but I think it's best to leave it to your imaginations. I wouldn't want to put you off your dinners, no matter how regrettable.
  4. The blades are made in the USA.The assembly is done in Mexico.
  5. Haha! Yeah. America - where cows were invented. That part of the cow was been eaten long before America even existed. America only gave it a name. Not that it didn't already have several.
  6. liuzhou

    Dinner! 2013 (Part 4)

    It is in Sichuanese. At least it can be. It is used in Sichuan to refer to fermented vegetables including cabbage and mustard leaf. Dunlop has a very peculiar and annoying habit of sometimes using Mandarin, sometimes using Sichuanese dialects without always informing the reader which she is using. She also uses traditional Chinese characters which are not generally used in Sichuan. Green beans with smoked bacon is a very common dish in Hunan, although they would also add a bunch of chili..
  7. Hemp oil is commonly used in a culinary context by at least one ethnic minority here in Guangxi, Southern China. With typical forthright language they don't resort to euphemism on the labelling It is used in a soup which is served at least once a day. And also in dipping sauces. It contains negligible amounts of THC. I'm not suggesting you cultivate it in your garden. That may lead to complications! I don't have a garden or a usefully positioned balcony, but if I did it would be herb central. Everything else I leave to the local farmers who know what they are doing a lot better than I ever will.
  8. What irritates me most are the clots who line up at the checkout, take forever bagging what they buy then seem utterly astonished that they are required to pay. They then spend another half a day trying to find their money, count out an approximation of the the correct amount, subtract the coupons and try to remember their own names. Checkout people are usually astonished that can I work out the price I have to pay in my head before the till tells them the answer and that I already have the correct amount in my hand. My ex-wife- would just mutter over and over again under her breath "Don't do it! Don't do it!" She knew I was about to pick the cretins up and deposit them in the nearest freezer cabinet. So she stopped coming shopping with me. After which, I was free to freeze the feeble out. I won't say the end of our marriage was entirely down to shopping, but it certainly contributed.
  9. liuzhou

    Rabbit

    Yes. the flavour is different. I'm not going to say it is better. Or less good. It's different. I cook duck more than most meats, but I'm not going to compare that to rabbit any more than I'm going to compare rabbit to salmon. I'm struggling to work out what your point is. So far it seems to be that, at best, rabbit is the same as chicken and at worse a lot less good. Both of which are, in my opinion and experience, nonsense.
  10. liuzhou

    Rabbit

    Here is one I made earlier. Well, today. Leg of rabbit, slow braised (about 8 hours) in red wine with onions, garlic, a basic bouquet garni and a shake of dried chilli flakes; fresh straw mushrooms; rice. Not a string in sight; full of flavour and cheap.
  11. liuzhou

    Dinner! 2013 (Part 4)

    Leg of rabbit, slow braised (about 8 hours) in red wine with onions, garlic, bouquet garni and a shake of dried chilli flakes; fresh straw mushrooms; rice. There was also a side of stir fried water spinach which I forgot to picture. And the red wine sauce was served in a jug.
  12. liuzhou

    Rabbit

    I think you need to change your butcher. The rabbit I buy is neither stringy, flavourless or particularly expensive (it's cheaper than the chicken). I'll grant you that wild rabbit is different - not necessarily better. Ditto, hare.
  13. I too live alone and therefore almost always shop alone. This is not a problem. I love checking out what the market has today and chatting with some of the vendors whom I have come to know over the twenty years I've been shopping there. Even the supermarkets can be interesting. However, I do have two dear friends who very occasionally accompany me (never both at the same time). This is a nice change. Fortunately both are as inquisitive as I am and have to check out everything they don't recognise and question the vendors. I usually learn a lot when they are with me - and they say the same. I also have other friends who I wouldn't take shopping if they paid me! The list shoppers. The 'I'm not really interested in food' shoppers. The 'what's cheapest' shoppers (I know too many people have no choice but to shop for the cheapest, but these people do. They will happily allow themselves to be ripped off in a restaurant, but won't pay ¥0.50 more than necessary in the market.) Back when I first arrived in China, I was teaching and students would always offer to come to the market with me 'to help me'. They hadn't a clue. They only knew how to make scrambled eggs with tomato but weren't sure which eggs to buy! I took to sneaking out a little known back door from the university (I lived on campus, as most college teachers still do), desperately praying no one would notice me and decide to 'help'.
  14. I went to a different supermarket today and they have the same long skinnier type, too. However they refer to it as ' 卷同青'. Two different names within 2 kilometers. I remember the first time I came across avocados in my local supermarket here in China. The sign by the vegetable shelves had one name (I forget what now.) I took then to the weigh station and the price label had a completely different name. Then the checkout receipt had a third name. All in a day's shopping here.
  15. Whether it is public domain, I don't know. But linking to copyright material is always OK. Copying and pasting it here isn't.
  16. liuzhou

    Rabbit

    That's definitely going on my list. I remember the first time I ate it - in a restaurant in Putney, London. It was one of those never-to-be-forgotten dishes. It was superb. Only hope I can do it justice.
  17. liuzhou

    Rabbit

    I've recently found myself a regular supply of rabbit (farmed, but good quality). It comes both in the whole beast and jointed. I've made a couple of dishes (braised in red wine with wild mushrooms and later a sort of stir fry riff) with which I was reasonably happy, but wondered what else I can do with it. It is a meat I do like.
  18. One of the things I love about the markets here in China, apart from trying to guess what weird things are, is that everything is very seasonal. No strawberries flown in from Peru when they are out of season here. So every day is kind of an adventure. What will they have which they didn't have yesterday? And it's great to watch the seasons spin round and greet old friends when they arrive - the first asparagus, the first button mushrooms, the first pineapples. You could set your watch by the pineapples! Right now it's straw mushroom season. In a week or two they will disappear for another year. But something else will turn up!
  19. Here it seems to refer to this specific 'skinnier type'. Most places, it refers to cabbage in general, as I said. You really should learn proper Chinese instead of that obscure minority language you insist on using! (That was a joke. Laugh.)
  20. Round this part of China it is known as 卷心菜 (juǎn xīn cài), which roughly translates as 'rolled heart greens'. But in other parts of China, this can mean 'cabbage' in general. Vegetable nomenclature in Chinese is a minefield.
  21. I've never actually tried myself, but agree they are unlikely to keep giving. I'd try a few hours or maybe overnight and see how it goes.
  22. Yes. But you'll soon find each one has dozens of names.
  23. Never heard of it. 90% of my house and its utensils and my dinner is bamboo. I use oil with my dinner!
  24. liuzhou

    Dead Chicken

    I think it's a personal / cultural choice. Most home and pro cooks here in China only buy live chickens, wring their necks, pluck, chop and cook immediately. To have them hanging around dead for a day or two would be anathema. On the other hand there are those who prefer a gamier taste, although you aren't going to get much of that from most chickens today..
  25. Seldom have I seen a more appropriate typo. Or is it Freudian?
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