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Bisquick


snowangel
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Some of the recipes actually have the bisquick replaced with a flour, baking powder and melted butter combination that I use in it's place.

Does anyone remember the Bisquick "Velvet Crumb Cake"? With the broiled coconut icing on top? Anyway, I'd love to try to duplicate it without the Bisquick (a little too much of a chemical taste in the cake) so if you have the proportions of flour and butter and bp, Kerry, I'd love to know!

Thanks.

Replace 1/2 cup bisquick with 1/2 cup flour, 1 tsp baking powder and 3 to 4 tbsp butter. I'd love to see this velvet crumb cake.

Thanks, Kerry. Can't wait to see if the texture of the homemade cake resembles the really soft (hence the velvet!) texture of the Bisquick cake! I'll try to remember to take a picture before we devour it.

kit

"I'm bringing pastry back"

Weebl

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The best thing to do, though, is to get yourself a dutch oven-type thing, fill it with peaches [...]  some personalized mix of sugars and cinnamon, throw a layer of Bisquick on top and bake yourself a cobbler. Idiot-proof.  Delish.  Especially served warm with homemade ice cream.

MMMMMMMmmmmm!!!

I love Bisquick cobbler - I add some pecan pieces to the Bisquick mix and spoon it over sliced peaches mixed with a bit of lemon juice, sugar and cinnamon.

I use different fruits and vary the type of nuts (almonds with blueberries, for example).

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I used to make these when the kids were little, and recently dug the recipe out to make again.

Place 2t. butter and 2t. brown sugar and 3 pecan halves in each of 12 muffin cups. Sprinkle cinnamon in each and heat in 450 degree oven until the butter melts.

Mix 2 cups Bisquick, 1/3 cup applesauce and 1/3 cup milk until dough forms, then beat 20 strokes. Spoon into the muffin cups and bake 10 minutes. Invert onto cookie tray. Delicious.

Stop Family Violence

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I imagine Bisquick, like most packaged foods, has gotten more packaged with ingredients of lesser quality over time.

My mom also made everything on the Bisquick box -- pancakes, biscuits and shortcake, mostly. And they were excellent. I still haven't had a strawberry shortcake that comes close to my mom's. The pancakes in Joy of Cooking are not unlike how the Bisquick version used to taste.

(I myself, however, use a recipe with a hoooooooge amount of butter in it.)

Impossible Pie -- I have been thinking about this all afternoon, even though I don't think I've ever had it. During my performance review I was sitting there thinking, "cheesy, ground beefy mass held together with eggs and flour" and I'm starving.

I like to bake nice things. And then I eat them. Then I can bake some more.

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My mom was a Bisquick Queen, too. To this day I cannot eat anyone else's cobbler having grown up eating her Bisquick-topped peach cobbler.

I won't offer anyone apolgies for using it myself. There are some dishes that just aren't the same without using Bisquick.

Her biscuit cutter had a red-painted wooden knob. She'd make the Bisquick biscuits and then invert the cutter, pressing the knob into the biscuit, making a little valley in the center which she would fill with apricot preserves (for her and my dad) or grape jelly (for us kids). Those Bisquick biscuits with jelly in the center would make Soup Night bearable for us kids.

 

“Peter: Oh my god, Brian, there's a message in my Alphabits. It says, 'Oooooo.'

Brian: Peter, those are Cheerios.”

– From Fox TV’s “Family Guy”

 

Tim Oliver

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I make a scone mix that I keep in my freezer.

3 cups flour

4 teaspoons baking powder

1/2 teaspoons baking soda

1/2 teaspoon salt

1/2 cup of sugar

combined and pulsed in the food processor with 4 ounces frozen butter diced small

If I left the sugar out of this mix, would it make a decent sub for Bisquick? I'm not a fan of shortening.

If only I'd worn looser pants....

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I make a scone mix that I keep in my freezer.

3 cups flour

4 teaspoons baking powder

1/2 teaspoons baking soda

1/2 teaspoon salt

1/2 cup of sugar

combined and pulsed in the food processor with 4 ounces frozen butter diced small

If I left the sugar out of this mix, would it make a decent sub for Bisquick?  I'm not a fan of shortening.

It is similar. But I would not expect it to perform to impossible feats like Bisquick does. Butter has water & milk in it and melts more than shortening. It might work but I can see it getting soggy and dense rather than it should in the impossible series of stuff.

To me it's like the folks that wanted to make a better German chocolate cake by improving the chocolate. Fine but you can't call it German chocolate then. Shortening is integral in those formulas and it just wouldn't be the same.

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Upthread there's another recipe for homemade Bisquick.

I want to want to use it myself, but I know that the last time I tried, I was disappointed.

I like to bake nice things. And then I eat them. Then I can bake some more.

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All this talk of Bisquick reminds me of a story from my youth.

I had been married to this wonderful farm girl from Missouri for a year or two when we decided to visit my grandparents on one of our trips. I think it was in '71 or so.

All the way there I kept telling how Grandmother made what I thought to be the best biscuits ever until I'm sure I was endangering the very pillars of marriage.

As Grandmother was preparing lunch my wife told her that she had been told of Grandmothers wonderful biscuits and would she please show her how to make them.

Grandmother replied, " Ain't nuthing to it , Honey." Whereupon she open a cupboard and pulls out a box of Bisquick.

I still get reminded of that visit every so often after these 35 or so years.

Robert

Seattle

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