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chappie

Scrapple and its culinary cousins

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Having grown up in and around Philadelphia I am fond of scrapple.  Just not the idea of scrapple.

 

One might add pepperpot soup.

 

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She gets her scrapple from Boston?

 

That's like going to Philly to find under-inflated footballs.

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1 hour ago, gfweb said:

She gets her scrapple from Boston?

 

That's like going to Philly to find under-inflated footballs.

HATER..... and some of us understand what "under inflated footballs" really means..........

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On 9/4/2006 at 1:19 PM, mrbigjas said:

chappie, i was out at borders here in philadelphia, today, and came across this book called country scrapple: an american tradition, by william woys weaver. that's the amazon link; i thought of this thread when i saw it.

 

I am reading this now and so far it is a great read.  I am particularly taken by a passage describing some of the "other" parts of the pig that might be employed in making scrapple:

"...other parts of the pig were also frequently employed. They included the feet, ears, tail, and snout; although separately each of these items was considered a worthy subject for specialized recipes. The feet could be used for making souse, the ears could be cut into strips and cooked like pasta, and the snouts could be pickled."

It really doesn't sound appealing to me, yet I still find myself fascinated by the idea of pig ear pasta.

 

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Cambridge is not Boston.

 

Night and Day , or day and Night.

 

they don't know anything about footballs in Cambridge.

 

Harvard plays the game across the river , in Boston.  Not in Cambridge.

 

the place in Cambridge , MA that made the srapple is very chichi.

 

and as the presenter figured out early on

 

scrapple is not sliced thinly.

 

it has to be thick enough to get a good crust on each side w the middle remaining soft.

 

freshly ground pepper is nice after its fried.

 

I have not tried any made with buckwheat.

 

my loss no doubt.

 

PS :

 

https://www.formaggiokitchen.com

 

makes WF feel like a Bus Stop.

 

 


Edited by rotuts (log)
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