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I need to prevent skin on a curd


Sethro
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I'm sure I'm having a brain fart and there's a simple solution to this.

Basically I'm doing a layered dessert, and the top layer is a yuzu curd. I'm making half sheet size batches with a rectangle mold, so I have to pour the curd before it's too cool, and then set it in the walk in.

Of course its forming a skin (which I wish I had though of before) and I can't wrap the surface because it's the top layer of the dessert and the glossy surface is what I want. Pulling off plastic wrap would obviously ruin that.

If I wrap over the rectangle mold (not touching the surface) I'm afraid I'll get alot of condensation that will drop onto the surface and leave those discoloration spots.

I'm at a mental roadblock and I'm about to say F it and just give it a clear napage next time, but I'd rather not.

Any ideas?

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perhaps you could mount it inverted, or upside down

use fine tefal silpat or acetate to line the tray

that way the top is protected and charged to be shiny

and you can wrap the bottom

ps i find mounting inverse to be superior in almost all regards

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Try paper towel over the frame, plastic wrap over the paper towel (and around and underneath, so it'll hold). Don't know if that'll keep it from forming a skin, but it should solve the condensation issue.

“Who loves a garden, loves a greenhouse too.” - William Cowper, The Task, Book Three

 

"Not knowing the scope of your own ignorance is part of the human condition...The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” - psychologist David Dunning

 

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perhaps you could mount it inverted, or upside down

use fine tefal silpat or acetate to line the tray

that way the top is protected and charged to be shiny

and you can wrap the bottom

ps i find mounting inverse to be superior in almost all regards

That's not a bad idea, but unfortunately it's a layered dessert, and the bottom two layers are baked (shortbread and yuzu mascarpone cheesecake). I actually bake it again briefly with the curd layer too, so it sets a little firmer.

I guess I could do it right side up, freeze it, and then invert it out of the frame onto a acetate to store it. Then I could invert and cut what I need for service from that...

I may try it, thank you!

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Have you tried spraying the plastic wrap with Pam? Or how about a garnish element to mask the marred surface? I've used cookie crumbs, crushed nuts, citrus zest, or whatever goes with the dessert.

Ruth Dondanville aka "ruthcooks"

“Are you making a statement, or are you making dinner?” Mario Batali

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You could also elevate your plastic wrap over the curd using toothpicks strategically placed at about 2-inch intervals along the curd.

I always attempt to have the ratio of my intelligence to weight ratio be greater than one. But, I am from the midwest. I am sure you can now understand my life's conundrum.

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Maybe I'm not totally following this, but it seems to me the problem lays with what your using as your top layer, the curd. Typically curd isn't used as a finishing layer on tortes because of the reasons you sited.

So basicly you just need to re-work it alittle.

If you mold it wrong side up as mentioned I'm not aware of any mirror or high gloss finish that won't be dulled by assembling that way, nor would your curd retain it's shine. Upside down assembly works great if your freezer area gets a beating, that will protect your cake top from dents or scratches, as would keeping them in your ring or pan while frozen. You can assemble tortes upside down but the nappage or mirror still gets put on last when you have it right side up. You can do a gelatinized glaze as your top layer that you can freeze the assembled torte on upside down, but it won't be a high shine.

Why not pour a clear mirror glaze over your curd to seal it?

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Maybe I'm not totally following this, but it seems to me the problem lays with what your using as your top layer, the curd. Typically curd isn't used as a finishing layer on tortes because of the reasons you sited.

So basicly you just need to re-work it alittle.

If you mold it wrong side up as mentioned I'm not aware of any mirror or high gloss finish that won't be dulled by assembling that way, nor would your curd retain it's shine. Upside down assembly works great if your freezer area gets a beating, that will protect your cake top from dents or scratches, as would keeping them in your ring or pan while frozen. You can assemble tortes upside down but the nappage or mirror still gets put on last when you have it right side up. You can do a gelatinized glaze as your top layer that you can freeze the assembled torte on upside down, but it won't be a high shine.

Why not pour a clear mirror glaze over your curd to seal it?

Well I wanted to try to avoid a glaze or napage, because frankly I just don't like them (not a huge fan of fruit tarts as you can imagine). Eventually I'll sucumb if nothing else works. I know curds aren't usually used as a top layer, but it looks so damn pretty. The whole way I'm doing it this dessert is kinda convoluted, but I'm really happy with the finished product except for a couple servings I have to put out for familly meal due to patches of skin.

Thanks to everyone for the response so far, btw.

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I'm sure I'm having a brain fart and there's a simple solution to this.

Basically I'm doing a layered dessert, and the top layer is a yuzu curd. ...

Any ideas?

How firm is the curd after it sets up? Might try letting it set up in a bowl covered with plastic wrap so you don't get a skin, then after it's cool, mix it just enough to spread into your mold. I've done this with extra lemon curd to fill tarts, etc. but it's not a really firm set.

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In my past life as a pastry chef.. we would rub the top of the pastry cream with a stick of butter, which would prevent the forming of a skin.

Hold the stick up butter in your hand and lightly run across the top, this also smooths the cream.

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It sets enough that I can cut it and have clean layers.

Those are some interesting ideas.

I'm not sure I understand the spray bottle suggestion though--I'd be misting it with water and then covering it?

I need to make another batch tommorow, so I'm going to make some exrta and try some of your suggestions. I'll be back to let you know what turns out.

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Funny story:

I added a little cornstarch to the mix to adjust the firmness, and behold--NO SKIN!!!

Now I can just wrap over the mold till it's cut, and then just pack it in a plastic case.

YAY!!!

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