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eG Foodblog: Monica Bhide - Thoughts without a thinker


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No not with the seeds -- do you have flat brown seeds?? I am not sure if I have seen red fenugreek -- can you describe it? Do you have a picture?

It is at home right now, but I will take a photo when I get there. It is a sort of medium rusty brown red color, and all crushed up.

I'm with you Nullo. I have some of the tan to reddish-coloured seeds and based on Monica's advice I may pick up the leaves as the seeds have little to no discernible taste or flavour.

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This is what we do. Take a fistful of leaves and grind them even further using your fingers. They almost become like coarse powder. Bake the tandoori plain parantha, slather some butter/ghee/oil on it and sprinkle the methi leaf powder.

Heavenly Methi Paranthas!!!

:wub::wub::wub:

This is one of my weaknesses.

Monica Bhide

A Life of Spice

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Monica,

Very good and quick adaptation of Aloo Methi. You are right, cleaning fresh methi leaves is a pain.. We have started using the frozen one because I like a lot of methi and this Kasoori methi packet is better for this version that you show here. Good job.

:blush: thanks

Monica Bhide

A Life of Spice

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Monica, i'm having the best time checking your blog every few hours- it is fabulous!! I'm going to the grocery now to get what i need to make the potatoes (the interesting twist is that i'm keeping kosher for passover this week and your recipe fits right in!)

As for the fritters for my son, can you do one that combines potatoes and lentils or peas- i want to show him that he might like things that are out his normal (and sadly limited) diet and plain potato fritters feel too much like his usual french fries. Thanks!!!!

Helen Kimmel

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Well, you can do potato and pea cakes that are panfried? My son loves them --no deep frying and all the goodness of vegetables (God forbid  :laugh: )

Aloo Tikki by another name.. Correct??

Or you can come over here and we can do a Pakora Chai Party...!!!

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I'm with you Nullo. I have some of the tan to reddish-coloured seeds and based on Monica's advice I may pick up the leaves as the seeds have little to no discernible taste or flavour.

whoa! must be kidding! the seeds have a pronounced bitterish

medicinal flavor.

the leaves are also a little bitterish, but in recipes i really don't think

you can substitute one for another.

fenugreek seeds are used in many south indian dishes, the leaves

are less widely used, but they are used.

typically you temper with them, or grind them with other things

(e.g. coconut) into various tasty pastes...

milagai

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fenugreek seeds are used in many south indian dishes, the leaves

are less widely used, but they are used.

typically you temper with them, or grind them with other things

When you both say temper, are you talking about seasoning a new cooking pan?

Kathy

Cooking is like love. It should be entered into with abandon or not at all. - Harriet Van Horne

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fenugreek seeds are used in many south indian dishes, the leaves

are less widely used, but they are used.

typically you temper with them, or grind them with other things

When you both say temper, are you talking about seasoning a new cooking pan?

Sorry - let me clarify. In Indian cooking tempering refers to heating oil and then adding selec spices to it. This tempered oil is then poured on a dish as the final seasoning.

Monica Bhide

A Life of Spice

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Thank you! I've always seen the word tarka used for the same thing, so I was confused.

Kathy

Cooking is like love. It should be entered into with abandon or not at all. - Harriet Van Horne

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Yes - coriander was a good two heaping teaspons, 1/4 teaspoon turmeric and 1/2 teaspoon red chili. Salt -- take a pinch and sprinkle lightly over the whole dish.

Does that help?

Yes! Thank you so much, I am anxious to try the dish.

If you can't act fit to eat like folks, you can just set here and eat in the kitchen - Calpurnia

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Well, you can do potato and pea cakes that are panfried? My son loves them --no deep frying and all the goodness of vegetables (God forbid  :laugh: )

Aloo Tikki by another name.. Correct??

Or you can come over here and we can do a Pakora Chai Party...!!!

Aloo Tikki sound perfect! Will you be making them this week, or can you provide us with a recipe? No deep frying AND has vegetables- WOW! Don't know what I'd do without egullet- first I learned about roasted cauliflower (my favorite thread) and now aloo tikki- without you my kids would eat no vegetables. Thanks Monica!!!

Helen Kimmel

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Monica, my dried methi has little stems, should I just crush them along with the leaves or clean them out?  The first time I crushed them but the stems were a little "distracting" in the mouth.

bbq4meanytime, you and I must be using the same brand of dried methi then! My brand has these little sticks that won't crush at all, so I either remove them or rub the mixture through a sieve (provided I don't mind powdered methi for the dish).

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  :smile:  (And a picture of the monkey.)

Well here he is - my life my monkey

gallery_6825_1143_63337.jpg

That's the cutest monkey I ever saw! I didn't think there were many moms like me who called their children monkeys, but obviously I'm not alone. It has to be my fault that my 2-yr old daughter thinks 'Monkey' is a term of endearment - sometimes she'll just give me a big, squeezy cuddle and say 'Amma (Mom) Monkey'.

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Well, you can do potato and pea cakes that are panfried? My son loves them --no deep frying and all the goodness of vegetables (God forbid  :laugh: )

Aloo Tikki by another name.. Correct??

Or you can come over here and we can do a Pakora Chai Party...!!!

Aloo Tikki sound perfect! Will you be making them this week, or can you provide us with a recipe? No deep frying AND has vegetables- WOW! Don't know what I'd do without egullet- first I learned about roasted cauliflower (my favorite thread) and now aloo tikki- without you my kids would eat no vegetables. Thanks Monica!!!

I will try to make them -- if time permits. If not here is a link in the India forum to these Aloo Tikki -- I am also happy to PM you a recipe.

But first let me see if I can make some time to do this.

Monica Bhide

A Life of Spice

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Monica, my dried methi has little stems, should I just crush them along with the leaves or clean them out?  The first time I crushed them but the stems were a little "distracting" in the mouth.

bbq4meanytime, you and I must be using the same brand of dried methi then! My brand has these little sticks that won't crush at all, so I either remove them or rub the mixture through a sieve (provided I don't mind powdered methi for the dish).

Try MDH -- really good stuff, no stems :biggrin:

Monica Bhide

A Life of Spice

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Monica

I am enjoying your Blog tremendously. It’s a bit of slow read for me being as unfamiliar with the cuisine as I am. I often have to stop to do a search to familiarize myself with what you are discussing.

Could you point me to a resource or provide me with a list of what to stock in the pantry to be able to try some of the delicious dishes you are discussing?

Thanks

Elie

Eliahu Yeshua

Tomatoes and oregano make it Italian; wine and tarragon make it French. Sour cream makes it Russian; lemon and cinnamon make it Greek. Soy sauce makes it Chinese; garlic makes it good.

- Alice May Brock

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