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fou de Bassan

persian red currants?

14 posts in this topic

I was taught to make persian rice, in Montreal, by a lovely woman whom I have lost contact with. The last time I saw her I coaxed these from her.

gallery_17623_661_12713.jpg

She called them dried red currants. She was mysterious as to her source and I have not been able to find more, either on the internet or in middle eastern markets.

Can anyone tell me their Persian name and where I can find more? I used all that I had to make the ?(then I put them back in the freezer)

Thanks in advance :biggrin:

kathryn


If only Jack Nicholson could have narrated my dinner, it would have been perfect.

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those look like barberries-zereshk in persian.

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Gingerly,

Thanks! I'll do a search for sources. I was taught to plump them in hot water and put them on top of the rice with a bit of saffron tinted rice for contrast. Is this common?


If only Jack Nicholson could have narrated my dinner, it would have been perfect.

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I thought that they where called Berberis in Persian, guess I was wrong..

I don't get it, but is it the same berry that you use when you make sumac..

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you're welcome!here's a recipe

and a possible online source http://sadaf.com/store/product108.html

my experience is limited to periodic dabbling, but that treatment sounds correct. the barberries i've bought in persian stores seem much darker-may just be the stock.delicious little things anyway!that is a lovely photograph.

Hector,i believe sumac is rhus coriaria and barberries as grown in iran would likely be Berberis vulgaris var. asperma

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Gingerly, thanks again!

I've bookmarked both links and the photo does look almost exactly like those I have. Now that I have a source I will not be so sparing with them. Seriously, no one could touch them because I was afraid to not have enough for the next polow.


If only Jack Nicholson could have narrated my dinner, it would have been perfect.

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Appearantly only the berry is edible on the whole berberis-bush.. the rest of the bush is filled with poison!

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Barberries are relatively common in Middle-Eastern food stores. They were once very popular in European cooking as a soaring agent, until it was discovered that they were an intermediate host for one of the rust fungi. At this point erradication occured. In the UK, they are now a very common hedging plant (mostly the purple forms).

They are excellent in many dishes.

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They are also very good for eye health. I make an infusion from the dried berries that I mix with tea. The local middle eastern market carries them. Even though they are dried, they should be stored in the refrigerator.

I saw an article about the various fruits that support eye healt in Prevention magazine 3 or 4 years ago and have been buying them ever since. They are also great sprinkled on salads, in sandwiches and etc.


"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

My blog:Books,Cooks,Gadgets&Gardening

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Thanks all.

Persian rice is on the menu for this weekend. I'll try to remember to take pictures and post on this thread for the sake of interest.

Andie, I'll try them in salads. That sounds really good!

Kathryn


If only Jack Nicholson could have narrated my dinner, it would have been perfect.

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You can get them in Turkish grocery stores, in my experience.

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Does anyone know how these might be related to the Cranberry or the the German Preiselberren ?

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Does anyone know how these might be related to the Cranberry or the the German Preiselberren ?

This might answer some of your questions.


"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

My blog:Books,Cooks,Gadgets&Gardening

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Andie,

You never cease to amaze me. What a wealth of information!

I wasn't able to make the rice this weekend, just too hectic. Soon, maybe.


If only Jack Nicholson could have narrated my dinner, it would have been perfect.

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