Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Sign in to follow this  
Suzanne F

eG Foodblog: Suzanne F - at the risk of shattering my image

Recommended Posts

Yeah, I know a blog is supposed to be one-way, but Hey, I'm getting lonely here!  Doesn't anybody want to say anything?  Pretty please??  :unsure:

Well, I WAS waiting for hourly reports at the farmer's market, but no one came. :sad:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
In defense of Maggi... Zarela makes a killer vinegarette that has Maggi in it. It is one of my staples. It is in her first book, Food From My Heart.

Maggi is The Devil's Head Oil.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
In defense of Maggi... Zarela makes a killer vinegarette that has Maggi in it. It is one of my staples. It is in her first book, Food From My Heart.

Maggi is The Devil's Head Oil.

Ah... But you would be surprised how often it shows up in "authentic" Mexican cooking. And I mean really authentic. As does evaporated milk, sweetened condensed milk, Knorr chicken base, and more. When I say "authentic" I mean the little cafe's, and the abuelitos kitchens. And that cooking is GOOD!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Fifi, be that as it may, IT STILL STINKS. :laugh: See why I say "authentic is just a way to keep the masses down" :raz: ?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Did you all miss me??

Let's see: another half a peach this morning (different peach, though) and a cup of instant Bustelo with skim milk, and vitamins. Then off to the Food Emporium on the other side of town. I hate that store since they started giving "bonus points" instead of discounts. I mean, do I really need a free meal at The Olive Garden, or some such place? :angry: No. I want lower prices, dammit!!

Once home, nibbling while putting stuff away:

- Terra Chips Zesty Tomato and Mediterranean, 2 new flavored versions of the veggie chips. Pretty darn good, the Mediterranean having a slight edge over the tomato, because the flavoring is sprayed on unevenly.

- a couple of pieces of cheddar cheese (nothing special).

- a couple of glasses of La Gitana, followed by a bottle of Bass Ale. :biggrin:

- and . . . and . . . ?? I think that's been it so far today. :shock:

But I started a big old pot of turkey stock, because they had some reduced-price wings: 4 huge ones, about 7 pounds, plus a couple of leeks, several carrots, celery stalks, parsley sprigs, whole peppercorns, and a dried bouquet garni that I'd forgotten I had. And the rest of the chicken broth I used for last night's pan sauce.

Now I've got to strain the stock and throw the bones back in while I reduce it some. Bye.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

:cool:

*Inhales deeply, tries to smell simmering turkey stock from Chicago office.*

:wink:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Lady T, if the turkey stock smells rather strange, it's because I made some "roast garlic stock" at the same time. When I went to puree the garlic cloves I roasted yesterday, I discovered they were rather well done, rather than done well. :sad: But with extra oil in the blender jar, they did become a tar-like paste. Usually I puree with the food mill, and have just a mush of skins left. But since the skins were still whole, and the puree so thick, I thought perhaps I would make "stock" by boiling the garlic clove skins. Then I could use the stock to thin the puree. The stock is now cooling, but I have yet to combine it with the paste.

While HWOE has been making the salad now, I've been enjoying an aperitif of Paumonok Festival Chardonnay (left from last night's sauce), followed by another white grape/peach spritzer. Gotta go now to finish my part of dinner: reheated penne from a couple of days ago, and "product" (frozen crab cakes, not homemade, alas).

PS: Elyse, the check is in the mail. :wink::raz:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Unfortunately, dinner was as warned:

- Leftover squid ink penne with a cuvee of tomato sauces (nuked)

- Mrs. Paul's so-called Crab Cakes

- French's "GourMayo" in supposed Wasabi and Chipotle flavors. Hey, I had coupons, so I figured I'd try them. And I can tell you now:DON'T BOTHER. Not as disgusting as Ranch Dip, but not worth the space they take up in the fridge.

- HWOE's salad w/olive oil and (supermarket) balsamic -- but about half the vegetables were from the Greenmarket, so it was still pretty good.

- Red Hook IPA.

When putting my leftover salad in the fridge, I found YESTERDAY'S l.o. salad I'd forgotten about. :unsure: No wonder there's no room in there.

I think I'll transfer the turkey stock to the slow cooker before I go to sleep. It needs to reduce more.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Put the stock in the oven on about 200. It will be fine until morning. So says the SSB.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

at the risk of shattering my image (thread sub-head)

Well, Suzanne, you have succeeded in doing so for me. :shock::laugh: I know you warned us...

"...don't expect any gourmet tap-dance."

But, still....

The one thing your blog and the others have done is make me feel pretty good about my eating habits. :biggrin:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Glad I could make you happy, Roz!! :laugh: It's kind of like those perennial "What do great chefs REALLY like to eat?" articles. Not that I'm anywhere near a chef, but. . .

Just a quick post for today:

"Jamon Serrano" from a company in Virginia on Balthazar baguette, with butter

1/4 of a not-very-good canteloupe

Cranberry cocktail spritzer.

Now we're off to the Aquarium. See y'all later!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A trip to the NY Aquarium must always be accompanied by a visit to Nathan's. That's just a given. Usually we stop there on the way home, which can wreak havoc with my ability to eat dinner. So today we stopped there first -- easy to do, since we had to take the subway to Stillwell Avenue, right where Nathan's is located (the stop closer to the Aquarium is closed).

So I had 1 hot dog with mustard, and a small order of fries with ketchup. And a sip of HWOE's root beer.

We had a terrific time at the Aquarium, as always. Ah, California sea otters! And they have a new exhibit called "Alien Stingers" on jellyfish, sea anemones, and coral -- my favorites!. But of course we were getting hungry by the time we left. Shall we have fish at Thalassa ($$$) or shore. ($)? Or stay in Brooklyn and eat somewhere by Sheepshead Bay (not Lundy's)? Or Middle Eastern on Atlantic Avenue near Court Street? We ended up deciding that 1 hot dog each had not been enough, so I would make hot dogs at home.

On the subway home, I had some water and a bite of fabulous Greenmarket peach; HWOE ate the rest of the peach and a half-awful, half great nectarine.

So dinner was Hebrew National Reduced Fat hot dogs, 2 each, one on a regular white Arnold hot dog roll, the other on an Arnold whole wheat hot dog roll (okay, but why bother?). With (not all on the same hot dog): Dijon mustard, grainy mustard, sauerkraut, sweet pickle relish, and pickled tamarind sprouts. Plus, of course, salad. And beer -- I had a Bass Ale. Followed by a little more of that Haagen Dazs coffee/chocolate ice cream with some coffee liquer and chocolate-infused tequila poured over.

It's about time I gave this up. How about . . .

fifi! :biggrin:


Edited by Suzanne F (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

ARG! You forget. I don't eat. It is really pathetic.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oh... I'll do it. Have to pay my dues.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Oh... I'll do it. Have to pay my dues.

Three days of corn dogs, here we come!! :laugh:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Woman cannot live by corn dogs alone. Although I tried to live on regular hot dogs, yesterday. :raz:

Thanks, fifi. Remember you can always give us the scientific analysis of what little you DO eat!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
Sign in to follow this  

  • Similar Content

    • By Mullinix18
      I'm thinking about starting a blog featuring the recipes of antoine Carême that I've translated from 1700s French? No English versions of his works exist and his work is hard to find, even though he is the greatest chef who ever lived. After I get through his works I'd add menon, la Varenne, and other hard to find, but historically important masters of French cuisine. 
    • By Duvel
      Prologue:
       
      Originally, we intended to spend this Chinese New Year in Hong Kong. We have travelled a lot last year and will need to attend a wedding already next month in Germany, so I was happy to spend some quiet days at home (and keep the spendings a bit under control as well). As a consequence, we had not booked any flights in the busiest travel time of the year in this region …
       
      But – despite all good intentions – I found myself two weeks ago calling the hotline of my favourite airline in the region, essentially cashing in on three years of extensive business travel and checking where I could get on short notice over CNY on miles. I was expecting a laughter on the other side of the line but this is the one time my status in their loyalty reward program paid out big time: three seats for either Seoul or Kansai International (earliest morning flights, of course). No need to choose, really – Kyoto, here we come !
       

    • By Tara Middleton
      Alright so as of a few months ago, I decided to take an impromptu trip to Europe--mostly unplanned but with several priorities set in mind: find the best food and locate the most game-changing ice cream spots on the grounds of each city I sought out for. One of the greatest, most architecturally unique and divine cities I have visited thus far has gotta be Vienna, Austria. But what in the heck is there to eat over there?! (you might ask). 'Cause I sure as hell didn't know. So, I desperately reached out to a local Viennese friend of mine, who knows and understands my avid passion for all things edible, and she immediately shot back some must-have food dishes. Doing a bit of research beforehand, I knew I had to try the classic "Kasekreiner". Please forgive my German if I spelled that wrong. But no matter how you say it- say it with passion, because passion is just about all I felt when I ate it. Translated: it basically means cheese sausage. Honestly, what is there not to love about those two words. Even if that's not necessarily your go-to, do me a favor and give it a shot. Trust me, you won't regret it. A classic Austrian pork sausage with pockets of melty cheese, stuffed into a crisp French Baguette. No ketchup necessary (...and as an American, that's saying a lot). YUM. Best spot to try out this one-of-a-kind treat?! Bitzinger bei der Albertina – Würstelstand. Now here's a shot of me with my one true love in front of this classic Viennese green-domed building-- Karlskirche. Now, go check it.
       
       

    • By KennethT
      OK, I'm back, by popular demand! hehe....  After being back for 2 days, I'm still struggling with crazy jetlag and exhaustion - so please bear with me!
       
      This year, for our Asian adventure, we went to Bali, which for those who don't know, is one of the islands in Indonesia.  Bali is a very unique place - from its topology, to the people, language, customs, religion and food.  Whereas the majority of people in Indonesia are Muslim, most people in Bali are Balinese Hindu, which from what I understand is a little like Indian Hinduism, but has more ancestor worship.  Religion is very important to many people in Bali - there are temples everywhere, and at least in one area, there are religious processions through the street practically every day - but we'll get to that later.
       
      Bali has some food unique to it among its Indonesian neighbors, but like everywhere, has seen quite a bit of immigration from other Indonesian islands (many from Java, just to the west) who have brought their classic dishes with them.
       
      Basically all Indonesians speak Indonesian, or what they call Bahasa Indonesia, or just Bahasa, which, anyone who has read my prior foodblogs wouldn't be surprised to hear that I learned a little bit just before the trip.  Unfortunately, I didn't get to use any of it, except a couple times which were totally unnecessary.  When speaking with each other, most people in Bali speak Balinese (totally different from bahasa) - many times when I tried using my bahasa, they smiled and replied, and then tried to teach me the same phrase in Balinese!  As time went on, and I used some of the Balinese, I got lots of surprised smiles and laughs - who is this white guy speaking Balinese?!?  Seriously though, tourism has been in Bali for a very long time, so just about everyone we encountered spoke English to some degree.  Some people spoke German as well, as they supposedly get lots of tourists from Germany.  As one of our drivers was telling us, Bali is heavily dependent on tourism as they have no real industry other than agriculture, which doesn't pay nearly as well as tourism does.
       
      While there are beaches all around the island, most of the popular beach areas are in the south of the island, and those areas are the most highly touristed.  We spent very little time in the south as we are not really beach people (we get really bored) and during planning, decided to stay in less touristed areas so we'd have more opportunities for local food... this didn't work out, as you'll see later.
       
      So, it wouldn't be a KennethT foodblog without photos in the Taipei airport and I-Mei Dim Sum, which we called home for about 4 hours before our connection to Bali...
       
      Beef noodle soup:

       
      The interior:

       
      This was the same as always - huge pieces of beef were meltingly tender.  Good bite to the thick chewy noodles.
       
      Xie long bao (soup dumplings) and char siu bao (fluffy barbeque pork buns):

    • By KennethT
      Recently, there was a thread about stir frying over charcoal, which immediately brought to mind memories of eating in Bangkok in July 2013.  At that time, I hadn't gotten into the habit of writing food blogs, and considering that I had some spare time this weekend (a rarity) I figured I would put some of those memories down on paper, so to speak.  Back then, neither my wife nor I were in the habit of taking tons of photos like we do nowadays, but I think I can cobble something together that would be interesting to folks reading it.
       
      In the spirit of memories, I'll first go back to 2006 when my wife and I took our honeymoon to Thailand (Krabi, Bangkok and Chiang Mai), Singapore and Hanoi.  That was our first time to Asia, and to be honest, I was a little nervous about it.  I was worried the language barrier would be too difficult to transcend, or that we'd have no idea where we were going.  So, to help mitigate my slight anxiety, I decided to book some guides for a few of the locations.  Our guides were great, but we realized that they really aren't necessary, and nowadays with internet access so much more prevalent, even less necessary.
       
      Prior to the trip, when emailing with our guide in Bangkok to finalize plans, I mentioned that we wanted to be continuously eating (local food, I thought was implied!)  When we got there, I realized the misunderstanding when she opened her trunk to show us many bags of chips and other snack foods.. whoops...  Anyway, once the misconception was cleared up, she took us to a noodle soup vendor:


      On the right is our guide, Tong, who is now a very famous and highly sought after guide in BKK.... at the time, we were among here first customers.  I had a chicken broth based noodle soup with fish ball, fish cake and pork meatball, and my wife had yen ta fo, which is odd because it is bright pink with seafood.  I have a lime juice, and my wife had a longan juice.
       
      This is what a lot of local food places look like:

       
       
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×