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Suzanne F

eG Foodblog: Suzanne F - at the risk of shattering my image

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Oh, shit, I guess I tagged myself. I warn you all: don't expect any gourmet tap-dance.

Okay, yesterday, Monday, August 25:

vitamin pills, with instant iced coffee (Bustello dissolved in boiling water, ice cubes, water, and skim milk. No Sweet 'n' Low this time)

1 Le Petit Ecolier 70% Extra-Dark Chocolate-covered cookie

Lots of tap water (mmmmmmmm, NYC water)

"Lunch" (around 3pm): salad with balsamic vinaigrette, left over from Saturday's dinner, kind of limp but not yet slimy, with some kasseri cheese microplaned on top, and freshly ground black pepper.

Dinner:

Only one glass (!) of La Gitana fino sherry

Lamb and artichoke stew out of the freezer, plus chickpeas (canned :shock: ) and artichoke paste.

Potato-plantain spatzl (how's THAT for fusion? :raz: ), also from Saturday.

Stir-fried green Swiss Chard

The ever-present salad, with doctored Marie's Feta Dressing (extra feta, oregano, dill, and yogurt)

1/2 of the bottle of Wagner (Finger Lakes) 1998 Cabernet Franc

That's it. HWOE finished off the Lychee and Lime sorbet that Rachel and Jason brought to the potluck, but I was too full.

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OOOh Where did you get the Kasseri from? I've been trying to find some outside Greece for ages

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You have trouble finding it? I'm really surprised. I'm used to seeing it in all kinds of cheese stores, and even some supermarkets. I'm in lower Manhattan, and do a lot of my shopping at a supermarket/gourmet store called Jubilee. They and another similar place nearby have some decent cheeses, if you don't mind them pre-cut and shrink-wrapped.

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HWOE finished off the Lychee and Lime sorbet that Rachel and Jason brought to the potluck

Mmm, I was thinking about that one just the other day. Note to self: Get ahold of some lychees.

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I just got some kasseri the other day and wanted to flame it and say OOOPPAAAHHHH but I chickened out.

Can you saute it up like haloumi?

:huh:


I love cooking with wine. Sometimes I even put it in the food.

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Suzanne, remind me what HWOE stands for again?

I think it stands for He Who Only Eats.

I've got one of those, too.

While we were standing in his kitchen the other day, I told him I was going to buy him a fabric cover for his range, like the kind you put on fancy cars in the winter time.

He has a brand-new range that has never :huh: been used.


Noise is music. All else is food.

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Yes, NeroW is correct. But really, it is unfair of me to call him that. He is the salad maker par excellence (mainly because he eats 4 times as much of it as I do, so it's his job :raz: ) and the ne plus ultra of oatmeal cookers. Oatmeal he learned from his father -- thick, dry, and chunky :wub: -- rather than his mother -- wet and slimy :angry: . I mean the style of oatmeal; not his parents themselves. And he's the house sommelier.

But to continue the blog: While out taking a walk and doing errands, I took in :wink: chicken onigiri from Daikichi, and a few "chicken fritters" (breaded fried slices of chicken breast) from Jubilee market. (As I just said on the Les Halles thread, I love chicken.) Then when I got home, a big glass of grapefuit juice cocktail, the kind with other fruit juices instead of sugar-water. And more NYC DEP 2003 (our house name for water).

Mmm, I was thinking about that one just the other day. Note to self: Get ahold of some lychees.

Doesn't it seem that lychees are in season so much longer this year? Is it because they're growing them in Florida now???

Onward to dinner! (I'm not really a snacker, nor a dessert eater, as you'll see.)


Edited by Suzanne F (log)

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Oh, shit, I guess I tagged myself.  I warn you all: don't expect any gourmet tap-dance.

I thought this was gourmet LAP dance. :biggrin:

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:cool:

Hm? What? Does Tommy know about this?

:biggrin:


Me, I vote for the joyride every time.

-- 2/19/2004

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Just wondering where all these "food blog" topics came from. Was there a writing contest assignment i missed?

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Ahh, cool. This particular phrase had me giggling for a good few minutes, and then again every time I thought of it:

"accompanied by an obviously expensive California chardonnay that tasted like having a stick of butter jammed into your mouth and getting it whacked down your throat with a freshly cut oak stump"

Thanks, Fat Guy.

And of course, Malawry's blog. I could never forget that.

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The thread that was linked to me when I asked where the food blog trend started. It was fat guy's blog. Sorry I didn't properly quote it but I don't know how to quote from a different thread.

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I'm liking the green glass better and better, but your attitude less and less. :biggrin:

How bout this: I try my hardest to remain ignorant and just say stupit shit?

Oh yeah. THANKS TOMMY!


Edited by elyse (log)

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How bout this:  I try my hardest to remain ignorant and just say stupit shit?

22.

:angry:

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:cool:

Possibly what five as well.

Tommy's simply ticked off because he missed a lap-dance reference.

Elyse: Ask all the questions you'd like (this is eGullet, after all!). Watch out for some of them answers, though.

:cool:


Me, I vote for the joyride every time.

-- 2/19/2004

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