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weinoo

eG Foodblog: johnder, slkinsey, weinoo (2011) - A tale of two boroughs

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I did. It was so dark it couldn't get any pics at all. The sushi overall was actually very good, but obscenely expensive. I know there would be a price surcharge because it was in Vail Village, but there was also a probably cost increase due to flying seafood in.

The fish was really fresh from what I could tell, but dropping 20 bucks each for the more complicated rolls and 8 bucks for a maki roll is a bit much.

Two of us, without any drinks really (2 beers) set us back about 150.


John Deragon

foodblog 1 / 2

--

I feel sorry for people that don't drink. When they wake up in the morning, that's as good as they're going to feel all day -- Dean Martin

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I did. It was so dark it couldn't get any pics at all. The sushi overall was actually very good, but obscenely expensive. I know there would be a price surcharge because it was in Vail Village, but there was also a probably cost increase due to flying seafood in.

The fish was really fresh from what I could tell, but dropping 20 bucks each for the more complicated rolls and 8 bucks for a maki roll is a bit much.

Two of us, without any drinks really (2 beers) set us back about 150.

That doesn't shock me...I can't even GET good sushi here in Kansas even if I wanted to pay that much. I'm sure it was an eye-opener for you guys, though. At least it was good! I'd pay twice that right now to have it lol.

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I loved this blog and am sorry to see it end. The week went so fast!

Your meal last night looks so good. I wish I could slurp a noodle or two!

Thanks to all three of you for the wonderful look into your world!

Glad you came along, Shelby. next time, we promise to butcher a squirrel :biggrin: .

It has been amazing. Thank you all for doing it. I am homesick now.

You're welcome, ambra.

Thank you all so much for an inspirational blog -I am now inspired to improve my cocktail making skills :rolleyes: . The blog was great!

As long as we convinced you to make a drink, it was a good week!

It was grand fun living vicariously through you three. THanks for inviting us in.

Oh, any time, Peirogi. Thanks for your help on the dumpling names. I've almost recovered from that day's eating.

Two of us, without any drinks really (2 beers) set us back about 150.

The only one who can say "without any drinks really (2 beers)" and get away with it!


Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"

mweinstein@eGstaff.org

Tasty Travails - My Blog

My eGullet FoodBog - A Tale of Two Boroughs

Was it you baby...or just a Brilliant Disguise?

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Thanks for letting us have a peek at your life, guys! I appreciate all your effort!


If you ate pasta and antipasto, would you still be hungry? ~Author Unknown

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Mitch t was actually just one beer each. Which isn't really drinking. :biggrin:


John Deragon

foodblog 1 / 2

--

I feel sorry for people that don't drink. When they wake up in the morning, that's as good as they're going to feel all day -- Dean Martin

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I also enjoyed the blog. It makes New York still be at the top of my 'travel to' list! I remember reading about the tenement museum a while back and just being fascinated with the history that's there. So it was nice to see that got a couple of mentions.


Cheese - milk's leap toward immortality. Clifton Fadiman

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Fine work gentlemen.

A note on the dumplings:

Pierogi are the Polish version, and uszki are Polish, frequently a garnish to soup, as in "barszcz z uszkami." The Polish form of borscht (barszcz) is typically made with fermented beet juice. There are also "pierogi leniwe" or "lazy pierogi" where the dough and the cheese filling are combined into a kind of flat log and cut like biscotti, then boiled. Then there are silesian potato dumplings, and various other kinds of Polish dumplings.

Varenyky are usually the Ukrainian version, though they can also be called that in Russian.

Pelmeni are the Russian version. There are also Russian piroshki, which are baked meat pies.

In practice, pierogi and varenyky can't easily be distinguished, and in Canada, where there are large Ukrainian and Polish immigrant populations, you can see "pierogi" and "varenyky" used interchangeably.


Edited by David A. Goldfarb (log)

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Mitch t was actually just one beer each. Which isn't really drinking. :biggrin:

Dude, that's like drinking water with your meal. :biggrin:

Honestly, I don't know how you refrained from drinking more. After skiing, I'd probably down 10 icy cold COORS lights. Can you even get a Bud light out there in Coors country? You didn't used to be able to.

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Long ago I quit drinking vermouth in my martinis because I couldn't find a vermouth that did not assault my palate. This week I was motivated to try Lillet instead. How delightful....Beefeaters and French herbs.

Thanks Guys. I had a great time following along. I especially loved the parts describing how life effects when and what you cook and why. Some of the best meals I've ever cooked were when I was tired and not trying.

Cheers, Ian

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Boy, do I miss New York! Was a kid there; the fanciest eats were at Schraft's, and the automat was all for fun. Then as a teenager, it was all bars (not clubs, thank you!)and stupid drunk at Greek diners. Good memories!


"Commit random acts of senseless kindness"

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Thanks you guys! This was such fun, living vicariously through your shopping, cooking, eating and drinking exploits. Love the pics of Russ & Daughters, one of my favorite stops when in NYC. Their cream cheese with caviar is a decadent treat on a bagel or thinned with a bit of creme fraiche or sour cream and piped into celery logs. Yum! And the cocktails were inspiring. Thanks for that! I just spent half the day rearranging my bar and unpacking boxes of booze that were all over the place. Lots of small quantities of a lot of random sample bottles doled out to me by various liquor reps. I'm feeling inspired to make some of those go away now in a productive/creative way, rather than simply drinking stuff straight just to get rid of it. It's nice to get a figurative sail full of wind just when you need one. Thanks for that too. :smile:


Edited by KatieLoeb (log)

Katie M. Loeb
Booze Muse, Spiritual Advisor

Author: Shake, Stir, Pour:Fresh Homegrown Cocktails

Cheers!
Bartendrix,Intoxicologist, Beverage Consultant, Philadelphia, PA
Captain Liberty of the Good Varietals, Aphrodite of Alcohol

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