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Kylie Kwong's MY CHINA


Ce'nedra
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No, I'm just referring to the 'authentic' recipes that are provided in the Chinese cookbook that I have (they were directly translated from recipes the author collected FROM China). Much of it was not to my liking, and I do prefer my own mum's Chinese cooking.

And yes, for sure Chinese cooking is more than about the amount of fats/oils added. Taste and texture, style of cooking are definately some of the major factors in contributing to what constitutes Chinese cuisine. But with that said, Chinese food WITHIN in China seems really love basting their food in fats and oils (yes, this isn't the case amongst EVERYONE, but to a large extent I must say). Has this always been the case? Or is it a newly evolved situation? I don't really believe that Chinese food has always been this way. Health has, after all, been a major factor in the creation of Chinese cuisine.

A question though: Would my mum's cooking still be considered 'authentic'? The produce is Australian obviously and there may be a few changes here and there to create a healthier alternative, but they are essentially still Chinese dishes and definately Chinese in taste. What's your say on that?

The term 'authentic' is very vague in my opinion, because there is no single recipe to making any dish. These different recipes could vary GREATLY amongst themselves too. In my personal opinion, authentic is really just about the recipes that have been passed down in a Chinese household overtime. However, that statement itself is very vague. I'm really not sure how you would define 'authentic'.

But yes, I do agree that alot of Kylie Kwong's recipes should be considered 'fusion'. Although it really depends on which cookbook you're referring to as well. Kylie does have a fair number of Chinese dishes that have been...dare I say, 'refined' (i.e. changed in ways to make it healthier), but are still essentially what I consider good, authentic Chinese.

Btw, I don't think it's a fair judgement to immediately state that Kylie Kwong's recipes are not at all authentic, because the recipes that were listed above, are not from her "My China" book (which you did acknowledge in the above post, I know hehe), but from another, which was not created with the intention of being authentic.

Now "My China" is written for a different audience.

Edited by Ce'nedra (log)

Musings and Morsels - a film and food blog

http://musingsandmorsels.weebly.com/

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Haven't seen My China, but I took a look at the above recipe links (I know, they are not from My China). Chinese food? Nah. Good (australian) fusion recipes? I'd give her the benefit of doubt.

I am not sure that what Ms Kwong is cooking is "fusion." I admit that I wish she would spend more time collecting recipes, and less showing off, but as much as she "bends" Chinese cuisine, her style does not become become "non-Chinese."

Although some of her "touches" are very idiosyncratic (brown sugar comes to mind), they don't "fuse" Chinese cuisine to something else.

BB

Food is all about history and geography.

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Haven't seen My China, but I took a look at the above recipe links (I know, they are not from My China). Chinese food? Nah. Good (australian) fusion recipes? I'd give her the benefit of doubt.

I am not sure that what Ms Kwong is cooking is "fusion." I admit that I wish she would spend more time collecting recipes, and less showing off, but as much as she "bends" Chinese cuisine, her style does not become become "non-Chinese."

Although some of her "touches" are very idiosyncratic (brown sugar comes to mind), they don't "fuse" Chinese cuisine to something else.

BB

I agree. I don't think it's right to consider some of her recipes non-Chinese...

Musings and Morsels - a film and food blog

http://musingsandmorsels.weebly.com/

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Gosh. I just followed the links. From, for eg., this link and others I looked at, which recipe shows the slightest chinese influence? I'd like to see some of her recipes from My China. I guess that would be her translation of the food she experienced in the old country.

A question though: Would my mum's cooking still be considered 'authentic'? The produce is Australian obviously and there may be a few changes here and there to create a healthier alternative, but they are essentially still Chinese dishes and definately Chinese in taste. What's your say on that?
I don't know how chinese you and your mother are, and, how chinese cooking has been passed down from generations. I'd rather not comment.
The term 'authentic' is very vague in my opinion, because there is no single recipe to making any dish. These different recipes could vary GREATLY amongst themselves too.

I don't concur.

My bad for getting my maths wrong and getting myself into the oft-sensitive 'authentic' issue. There are too many things I want to say on this subject but I'm biting my lips.

Peace.

Edited by Tepee (log)

TPcal!

Food Pix (plus others)

Please take pictures of all the food you get to try (and if you can, the food at the next tables)............................Dejah

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LOL I didn't mean to start an argument of any sorts (I don't even believe it was), just commenting that it's not entirely fair to Kylie Kwong to say her recipes are 'non-Chinese'.

But I agree. From your link, those dishes are in no way Chinese.

In fact, it wasn't meant to be. Kylie also cooks Western food; not only Chinese. Which is where I think the misunderstanding arose from. Those were not aimed at being Chinese.

:smile:

As for my mum, she in no way cooks like Kylie Kwong :raz:

Musings and Morsels - a film and food blog

http://musingsandmorsels.weebly.com/

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No, I'm just referring to the 'authentic' recipes that are provided in the Chinese cookbook that I have (they were directly translated from recipes the author collected FROM China). Much of it was not to my liking, and I do prefer my own mum's Chinese cooking.

And yes, for sure Chinese cooking is more than about the amount of fats/oils added. Taste and texture, style of cooking are definately some of the major factors in contributing to what constitutes Chinese cuisine. But with that said, Chinese food WITHIN in China seems really love basting their food in fats and oils (yes, this isn't the case amongst EVERYONE, but to a large extent I must say). Has this always been the case? Or is it a newly evolved situation? I don't really believe that Chinese food has always been this way. Health has, after all, been a major factor in the creation of Chinese cuisine.

A question though: Would my mum's cooking still be considered 'authentic'? The produce is Australian obviously and there may be a few changes here and there to create a healthier alternative, but they are essentially still Chinese dishes and definately Chinese in taste. What's your say on that?

The topic of "authenticity" is indeed a big discussion.

But being "popular" and being "authentic" are two very different things. Kylie Kwong's products (TV shows, books, etc.) may be wildly popular and well-liked, but are not necessarily authentic as her publicists want people to believe.

I have not read any of Kylie's books. But I have seen all her "Simply Magic" cookshows. If the recipes in her books are similar to those presented in her TV shows, then I would question how one can label them as authentic.

I have posted my evals on her show in this thread:

http://forums.egullet.org/index.php?showtopic=93760

Just a repeat of some of my points:

- Why use fresh chilis and sichuan peppercorns in many of the Cantonese recipes? You don't usually find those in Cantonese cuisine.

- "Chinese" Iceberg Lettuce Salad... Huh?

- Fish sauce in Chinese cooking. Why?

- Sesames sprinkled on noodles... Hmmmm

Calling it "her version" of something or Cantonese/Chinese-inspired, I have my peace of mind. Calling that "authentic", I beg to re-evaluate.

W.K. Leung ("Ah Leung") aka "hzrt8w"
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I've been on the lookout for good Chinese recipe books and I must say Kylie Kwong was never on my list. I have seen her cooking shows a couple of times and was never impressed.

I saw her demonstrating one recipe from My China (if I'm not mistaken) cookbook recently, and it was a wood ear fungus salad. Oh dear! Sure, her ingredients are 'Chinese', but her recipes? Far from it. Using Chinese ingredients does not automatically equal Chinese recipes. Although that seems to be what she is trying to promote.

Just my opinion, of course. I may call her a good chef/author, but not one I'd refer to for real Chinese recipes.

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hzrt8w: I agree her Simply Magic book isn't authentic. I would probably see it as...maybe modern Asian?

It's not exactly fusion since the ingreidients for the most part are essentially Asian, but the outcome dish is rather 'new'.

Just a correction though. It is possible for Chinese cooking to use fish sauce. While it isn't wildly popular, it does occur, most in the South-Eastern regions :raz:

Sarah!: I have taken a look through her My China cookbook (though admittedly, most of it, not all of it) and I too have noticed that particular salad you mentioned. I believe that was her own creation or maybe a newly 'evolved' dish she learnt on her trip in China (certainly not age-old and traditional).

She also has a few other 'new' creations in My China, but for the most part, the recipes retains a much more authentic element than her other books (not that the other books are all Chinese but still..).

How authentic exactly, I will have to say I don't know.

And I agree, 'Kylie Kwong' isn't exactly the first name you look for authenticity but to discredit her for being entirely 'un-Chinese' (not that you said so; just something I'd like to point out :smile: ) is not correct either.

Musings and Morsels - a film and food blog

http://musingsandmorsels.weebly.com/

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Most Americans would not go anywhere near many authentic Chinese dishes, and all successful Chinese cookbook authors in the States have realized this. To me, "great-tasting" trumps "authentic" every time. Kylie is writing for an American, not a Chinese audience. Her Deep-Fried Eggplant with Tomato Dressing is definitely not something a cook in China would make, but it's utterly delicious.

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