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eugenep

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Everything posted by eugenep

  1. I also have my chocolate notes from the CIA book in case it helps amateurs (like myself) Crystal Types 1 - 4 bad. Types 5-6 good. Type 1 melts at 64 F Type 2 melts at 72 F Type 3 melts at 79 F Type 4 melts at 84 F Type 5 melts at 94 F Type 6 melts at 97 F So heating above 84 but below 94 will melt Type 4 (and below) crystals but retains Type 5 and 6 crystals. Tempering to 90 F (for dark chocolate) is optimal because it’s between the 84 – 94 sweet spot. But seeding this will lower the temperature and contain Type 4 crystals along with Types 5 and 6. So once you seed (lowering the temp and adding bad Type 4 crystals) you need to heat it up to 90 F again to get rid of the Type 4 crystals and leave only Types 5 and 6. Alternative Technique: (1) melt out all crystals completely; (2) cool the chocolate and agitate it so that both Type 4 and Type 5 crystals form; (3) rewarm chocolate to melt at all Type 4 and below crystals leaving only Type 5 crystals for seeding; (4) maintain at proper temp during use Seeding Technique: (1) melt chocolate to remove all butter crystals – 120 F for dark and 104 F for milk and white chocolate; (2) slowly add bits of tempered seeding chocolate and stir; (3) make sure proper temperature, no unmelted lumps, and viscosity is right, then test it out to make sure there are no streaks and it sets quickly; (4) if it fails the test, the continue to add more seeding chocolate and continue to keep the right temperature to melt Type 4 crystals and test again. 90 F for dark and 86 F for milk and white chocolate is optimal tempering temperature. Agitation will promote the formation of cocoa butter crystals. Test to see if agitated enough if sets quickly without streaks. Residence Time at the 90 F temperature is needed for both the Type 5 crystals to form and Type 4 crystals to melt. Milk Chocolate and White chocolate take more residence time than dark chocolates. You need to test a sample to see if it sets quickly without leaving streaks to ensure there are no Type 4’s left. Under and Over Seeding. If you don’t seed enough, then Type 4 crystals can form and result in fat bloom. If you overseed, then the viscosity will be too thick. You need something like 1% of the chocolate to be Type 5 crystals. Long residence time at 90 F will keep forming a lot of Type 5 crystals. Some chocolatiers will reheat a portion of this (above 94 F) to destroy some Type 5 crystals and maintain lower viscosity for a thinner liquid. Ganache. The emulsion can break when the fat separates. The fat coalesce and clumps together and then floats to the top of the ganache breaking the emulsion. This happens because of two reasons: (1) either there is too much fat in the ganache; (2) or the ganache is agitated the wrong temperature. When it is hot (90 F or greater) the fat won’t clump together because very liquid. When it is too cold (below 74 F), the fat won’t clump because it is already crystalized. The danger is when you agitate the ganache between 74 F to 85 F and in liquid form that the fat will start to clump together and separate. Separated ganache will have a grainy texture and must be repaired. Repairing a ganache. You warm it between 90 F – 94 F. The max temperature is the temp that will not destroy the Type 5 crystals but destroy all those below, like Type 4. You then agitate it to create more Type 5 crystals. If this fails to repair your ganache, this could mean there is too much fat and you need liquid to thin it out. Adding liquid creates space between the fats so they don’t clump together. Liquids can include: spirits, syrup, water, milk (not cream bc too much fat). Milk and water can shorten the shelf life of the chocolate so that’s not good. The best option is spirit or syrup. Do not add too much liquid or else it will soften the ganache too much. Emulsions are mixtures of fat and water. One component of fat/water is broken up into tiny size 10 microns within the other ingredient. The broken micron bits are the dispersion and the thing the microns are broken up into is the continuous phase. When fat microns are dispersed in continuous water phase, this is a fat-in-water emulsion and includes ganache. When water microns are dispersed in continuous fat, this is a water-in-fat emulsion and includes butter. The emulsion breaks because there is too much of the micron dispersion phase so they do not remain separated for too long and clump. When clumping happens, the separate from the continuous phase. In a broken ganache, there is a too much fat micron dispersion in the continuous water phase – so that’s why you need less fat and more water to repair your ganache. Agitation of the ganache when it is neither too hot or too cold, will cause the fat microns to clump together and then break the emulsion. When making a ganache, use tempered chocolate. Do not heat above 94 F or else the stable crystals will be killed off. The ratio for ganache is: 2 parts chocolate and 1 part cream. Then little bit of buttery, corn syrup, and liquor. · The glucose syrup is there is absorb the excess water from the cream which will then prevent bloom and stabilize the emulsion. The amount of syrup required would be 10 -40% of the cream. 25-30% is a good amount. Syrup isn’t added for sweetness (that comes mostly from the chocolate). The syrup stabilizes the emulsion because it makes the liquid thicker (thereby preventing the movement and separation of fat in water). When cream is added to chocolate, the sugar in the chocolate seeps into the liquid in the cream and then can later recrystallize as sugar crystals – breaking the emulsion. The syrup prevents this re-crystalization process. Syrup is not counted as a liquefier because it binds more liquid than it gives. · Liquor is added to thin out the thick fluid and also for flavor. Butter is optional and is added to substitute for cocoa butter in the liquor (it also adds dairy flavor). The amount of butter should be 50% of the liquor. · Cream and liquor both add water. The cream also adds butterfat. This butter fat is responsible for the lower melting temperature of ganache vs. dark chocolate. · Storage. Cream based ganaches are safe for only 3 weeks. You need liquor, invert sugar, and glucose syrup to soak up the water and extend the shelf life. · Chocolate. If the cocoa butter is very high, then the chocolate will be harder and the risk of the emulsion breaking and bloom is higher owing to the high cocoa butter. If the cocoa butter is very low, then the chocolate will be softer but can be too soft to set properly. Chocolate for confectionary purposes should contain at least 32% cocoa butter. In sum, butter fat softens chocolate while cocoa butter hardens it. Steps to making a ganache: ( (1) Heat the cream to boiling; (2) pour it into tempered chocolate and let sit for 1 minute undisturbed; (3) start stirring a circle from the inside out, melting the chocolate; (4) if some chocolate is un-melted, heat but not above 94 F (enough to melt but does not destroy stable crystals); (5) now add soft but not melted butter (butter cannot be melted or its emulsion will be separated); (6) now add liquor or flavorings (after butter because you don’t want to cool the temperature until butter is melted into ganache); (7) cool to room temperature, about 72 F, but do not refrigerate or else emulsion will break. This may take up to 1 hour depending on your room temperature; (8) agitate briefly to help crystalize the fat (both cocoabutter and milk butter). Do not agitate too much or else it will change the texture from smooth and creamy to short; **Remember, you can agitate ganache either when it is really hot or really cold but not in the middle. Agitate when it is really cold to about 72 F here. (9) once the room temperature is reached, you have to pipe it within 15 min or else it will crystalize; (10) once piped, wait 15 min to overnight for the ganache to fully harden. Do not refrigerate ganache because it will form unstable crystals.
  2. I am just a home cook and and an amateur at chocolate making but I did read the chocolate making book by CIA, Culinary Institute of America The CIA procedure would: (1) turn up the temp super high to kill all good and bad crystals (2) It would then cool down and form the good crystals by seeding the chocolate with pieces of chocolate. This seeding will cool down the chocolate where if forms the bad unstable crystals below the 34 C you mention I'm guessing (3) to make sure you keep only the good crystals and kill the bad ones, you then need to heat it up again to the point were only the good crystals are present So it's by seeding the chocolate in stage 2 that cools it down too much. I guess if there was a way of seeding without cooling it down below that special 34 C range it would be innovative I don't know if this answers your question but I hope so and please correct me if I'm wrong. thank you
  3. @jimb0 - nice. I was always afraid of adding other ingredients to bread just because I thought the flavor of carrots, fruits etc. would be lost when mixed into all that dough and the high heat of the oven might further burn off and destroy some/most of the "flavor molecules?" responsible for flavor - e.g., when adding lemon zest (can't taste it) I've only had fruits/veggies mixed bread from mass market grocery chains and these didn't taste that great so..i wonder about the taste of veggie/fruit mixed breads and whether or not its worth it (e.g., does the flavor add to the bread and is it still retained after mixing and baking etc.)
  4. eugenep

    Dinner 2019

    there was this one theory by historians that we moved from a hunter-gatherer society to a grain based agricultural one because humans wanted to grow grain to make beer so that's why we settled down to farming and civilization happened beer gave rise to our civilization and that without beer we would all be nomadic barbarian hordes
  5. it's beautiful i've been saving for a house too but the ones I can afford in a nice neighborhood close enough to work are not good looking i guess we'll see i always thought houses farther away from the major metropolitan areas would cost less with better value errr...if the house you purchased is close to the NJ - NYC area and within affordability please message me for tips on areas to look at- e.g., Rutherford etc.
  6. eugenep

    Dinner 2019

    thanks for the info I always assumed the IPA was beer named after the British one (for marketing purposes) and the two are different - with American hops being the distinctive and defining character profile of the IPA
  7. eugenep

    Dinner 2019

    wow - that's impressive. thanks for sharing. I see there is an IPA, an American invention I believe, that's +1 for the Americans. I see that it is more refined than the typical can of beer too. Hmmm...I do wonder if European pork retains more fat and flavor than American hogs
  8. eugenep

    Dinner 2019

    thanks for the always beautiful photos I noticed the stitching on your duck; it seems like the Chinese style of roast duck I see on videos during the preparation stage. Modernist Cuisine book says that the oven temp for Chinese roast duck is specially made to go crazy hot - maybe over 2,000 F or something - and not something you can do at home. That's why I never tried Chinese roast duck at home and some American recipe had weird ways of doing it involving an air pump etc. But could you talk about how you produced such a nice duck? ...and wondering if you did the Chinese method or found a substitute technique ? thank you
  9. @Duvel - I think you're the authority here I actually don't know the answer but I'll give one in ignorance anyway bc I like dark beers and bc I'm bored with nothing better to do and possibly being wrong and embarrassing myself doesn't matter bc this is online world My guess is that drinking it at room temperature ( 70 F) will bring out the flavor but if it tastes too bitter then you don't want that much flavor and refrigerating it at under (40F) is better since it masks the bitter taste I would drink it after refrigerating it (to bring down bitterness) Can I guess that you are drinking Duvel? I tried it once but I believe it's an ale that tried to be a light lager bc light lagers were trendy at the time it was first produced (many decades ago I'm assuming) and Duvel wanted to sell its beer to the masses etc. So that might be why it's color is light unlike porters and stouts (real beer). so I wasn't a fan of Duvel (no offense) bc it's like a dark ale that is trying to be a light lager happy drinking
  10. eugenep

    Dinner 2019

    pizza looks really good - a lot of your meals are executed pretty perfectly Question: did you use all purpose flour and or 00 Caputo or a different flour? And..would you happen to know the protein content of the flour you are using offhand? thank you I imagine that the circle shape for stretching the dough depends on higher protein/gluten for elasticity?
  11. Bourbon barrel aged stout . It taste great but sort of expensive since it’s about four dollars to six dollars a bottle sometimes . I try to just have one each night Because something like three a day is the same as the cost of financing a new SUV
  12. I never had a French beer before but I heard it exists. Hmmm....they look like lagers - maybe light tasting like water? The altbier (old beer) - wonder if they aged it
  13. yeah - maybe the dedicated canele molds might better distribute the heat. I might try it that way but wary of accumulating more molds in the closet and I have to eat my mistakes first before possibly eating more mistakes
  14. I tried making it again using different recipe tonight. The outside burned only a little bit and was only a little bitter but when I cut open and ate the inside it’s raw dough. Yesterday it was burned completely. I think it’s not coming out right and I think I’m going to give up. It’s too hard for me. I don’t know if people know what the problem is. I’m using a muffin pan. Maybe the heat distribution in the mold might be more even so that the inside cooks before the outside burns?
  15. I tried one at their location in Williamsburg, Brooklyn a few years ago. I think it was priced at $7 or $9 or something and it tasted like a good pie - like one you would make at home using one of Rose Berenbaum's recipes in Baking Bible but I think it was the first time I tasted normal store pie that tasted close to homemade (but less fresh) if you don't cook or bake at home this pie will be like a new revelation or something bc all you've eaten are factory pies that taste like poop but if you cook at home, then it's nothing special and just like what you make at home
  16. hmm...I wonder if the bitterness from the endive will balance the sweetness of the sauce
  17. Hmmm...I thought the brining (dry or wet) done day before for most meats (except fish etc) good to change the protein structure so as to retain more moisture ...the recipe calls for 150F but I read from other sources it should be rare to medium raw because the breast drys out super fast and is to be eaten on the raw side like steak and not like chicken breast my biggest issue is with the right sauce that isn't too sweet or finding a good savory sauce none of the duck breast recipes I've tried taste as good as the Chinese roast duck - except duck confit or duck confit turned into a rillette but it's the duck legs (not breast)
  18. that sounds pretty cool and experimental. like..you fermented the steak with the fish sauce and the bacteria (or enzymes?) broke down the "protein structural bonds?" thereby tenderizing it and producing a more richer flavor maybe also? I have the ??? marks because I don't know the exact term bc I don't have a science background and my memory of how the process works is too hazy and unpracticed but interesting to see more fermented meat product experiments (I heard with koji?) there's just too many steps and work for me but maybe I should do a test for a dinner party one day if it's super wow
  19. That's cool - a book written by chefs for chefs/cooks I wish I could read an issue or get sample articles to know if it's content relevant to me I subscribed to some magazines but end up never reading their articles and eventually just cancel the subscription (with great difficulty) I thought Lucky Peach was kinda cool but too much in-fighting among the team before getting dissolved ( I heard)
  20. I tried the canneles recipe by Saveur last night in a muffin pan at https://www.saveur.com/caneles-recipe#page-2 and they came out burnt half-way through cooking i compared other recipes and they all say less than 1 hour but the Saveur recipe required over 2 hours for a similar or less portion size Is Saveur or Niko Triantafillou (the writer) mistaken and I wonder about Saveur (like is it a real magazine or just a vehicle for ads)
  21. I really liked his North African lentils recipe and easy Chinese stir-fry. Some recipes taste terrible though and might be poorly executed if you follow his directions. But I think it's very American bc its like a conglomerate of different ethnic foods (which is positive) but can lack fundamental, codified, techniques and principles. Like.I read that Americans, a country of working class immigrants when they arrived, lacks tradition and longevity of culture and that over 50% of our engineers are also from overseas bc we lack the math, science and technical skills (I blame it in our bad public school system) I think Bittman is very American alright - like conglomerate of cultures but lacks tradition and codification etc.
  22. eugenep

    Dinner 2019

    For Pommes Anna I used the Melissa Clark version at https://cooking.nytimes.com/guides/33-how-to-make-pommes-anna Well. Sort of. I used red bliss potatoes instead and it worked out okay. I think I should have given it less heat since it was something like 1 lb of potatoes rather than the 6-7 lbs she called for. I believe Yukons and Red Bliss are similar I was planning to do a leg of lamb also and Pommes Anna again for Easter. This meal was the test recipe actually. That's kinda cool that we came to the same judgment about what to cook for Easter. I was going to do a rolled lamb based on Cook's Illustrated recipe. My biggest worry is geting the lamb leg. I think it's possible to order it from the grocery store. My girlfriend said she'll try to get it for me but that's my biggest prob so far. Hope to see your pics of the food on Easter if you decide to make it. I'm just getting boring lamb leg from a US producer bc it's grain fed and not grass fed (which would give it more gamier flavor which is not preferred according to Cook's Illus)
  23. eugenep

    Dinner 2019

    The technique is very impressive and it's pleasing to the eye to look at also. For the meat temperature...it loos like chicken breast maybe? - best at 140F and would start to dry as it gets hotter.. were you able to...bake the pastry and heat the chicken breast in the right way also? ...and how was the taste? I mean, did it taste as good as a most pastry dough and have the savory-goodness from the meat? -thank you
  24. eugenep

    Dinner 2019

    I just did a 2 hour braise and then let it sit in the heated ducth oven for an hour and then refrigerate. (1) I believe the meat sitting in the dutch oven still cooks it on lower heat for another 30-40 min (2) and then the refrigeration firms up the meat to make it easy to slice and changes the texture I really didn't experiment to verify (1) or (2) but if someone did that would be cool - maybe write a whole book on these unverified techniques. They were just instructions on an online blog recipe but recipes just say "do it" without telling you why (maybe bc they don't know either?) I wonder if beef tongue might require a longer braise just because of older meat with more flavor but also tougher??
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