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forever_young_ca

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Everything posted by forever_young_ca

  1. I have used microfibre cloths before, with mixed results on ss and granite. This product may be similar but the results are far superior. I have asked my local kitchen store about them and they are going to get a shipment in. My housekeeper vowed that she would never buy ss appliances because of her experience in trying to keep them clean. After using these cloths she is sold and is now considering a ss fridge. They may be microfibre based, but again, they do a far better job than the previous microfibre cloths I had tried.
  2. I have a new kithen that looks great - ss appliances, granite countertops, glass topped table. However, the practicalities of keeping it looking great was beginning to wear me down. I was tired of fingerprints on the stainless steel and wipe marks on the countertops and glass. I have recently returned from a holiday in England and on a whim bought a 2-pack "E-Cloth", being very sceptical about the claims, but desparate to try anything. I could not believe the results. With minimal effort everything was shiny and looking like new. How does it work? I don't know, but the method is simple. The thick cloth is wet with water - no chemicals - and the surface is wiped down. The blue cloth (I think they call it the glass polishing cloth) then wipes the surface dry. It is absolutely amazing. It is easy and leaves no smear marks. I am so in love with this product I am going to buy a couple of more blue cloths so I can use it to wash windows and other surfaces as well. I looked up the web site and found that it is a UK product http://www.e-cloth.com/home.asp but a quick google shows that they are available for sale on line in the US. I have to find a Canadian supplier, or order on line. Does anyone else have experience with this product?
  3. Happy Birthday - what a great way to celebrate. I will definately try the champagne jelly recipe - a way to add some sparkle and pizzaz............
  4. I know raspberries are traditional. Unfortunately, because of the "no seed" limitation, I must substitute another fruit. Pears are in season here, so I am thinking that that would be an option. Jackal - do you use raspberry jam to coat your pieces of sponge cake, or do you just soak then in sherry? Abra - I am sure that the majority of my guests would love the tiramisu eggnog trifle. The picture looks gorgeous. However, one of my few taste dislikes is coffee, so that counts it out for me!
  5. I saw Nigella do the chocolate trifle on the food network. It looked very rich and delicous.
  6. Great suggestions.....keep them coming How do you do your roasted pears?
  7. I am hosting 11 adults for Christmas dinner. I am starting to think about dessert and leaning towards trifle, plus perhaps one or two other things. I think of trifle as a spectacular looking presentation, and something that can be made ahead. My mother cannot eat seeds or nuts, but I can usually work around this. I would love to have some suggestions as to what I can do to make this a memorable dessert................................
  8. I had a Kenmore in my old house (not the top of the line model). It did a great job of cleaning - no rinsing necessary, but was noisier that I like. I think the top end Kenmore's have more insullation and would be quieter. We moved into a new house last month & it has a Fridgidaire. I hate it - why? Let me count the ways................... - It has a rack in the door for utensils that neither gets them clean, or dry - When you open the door the steam vents in the front drip water all over the hardwood floor. - It is noisy. We have a very open plan kitchen, great room and the noise is annoying. I want a dishwasher that I can run while sitting at the table. - It does not clean the dishes, I am back to rinsing.................... I have several friends that have high end Kitchen Aids. They are very quiet. large capacity, and do a great job. I think that dollar for dollar that would be my choice. I am hoping that my new one will break down soon, so I have an excuse for a new one!
  9. I am bumping up this thread, hoping someone can help me.......... My husband has purchased a raclette grill and we have invited guests for a trial dinner on Saturday night. Has anyone tried one out? Any suggestions as to what to cook would be welcome........ We had a raclette dinner at friends a few weeks ago, and they offered a selection of prawns, scallops, chicken, fish and pork plus veggies and cheese and bread. These could be cooked on the grill or in the pans underneath and dipped into a selection of 3 different sauces.
  10. I made the "Braised Halibut Steaks with Creamy Leeks" for supper last night. It was delicious. The leeks cooked to a very soft, creamy succulent texture and the halibut was perfecty cooked while still being moist. I followed the receipe exactly (unusual, but true). This one is a keeper. I will also try it with salmon.
  11. I have made for years a peach/blackberry pie. It is always the first dessert to get eaten. I use the fresh fruit pie receipe in the Joy of Cooking and lattice the top - very pretty. It is a perfect end of summer dessert.
  12. One of the best pies in the world is peach/blackberry. I don't know if edibile peaches are available where you live, but this is a heavenly combination. I use the receipe in the Joy of Cooking for fresh berry pie - it thickens with tapioca. I used slighlty more peaches than blackberries, as I find the peaches cut the blackberry seediness. Enjoy.
  13. I made the "Not your Boston Baked Beans" from recipe gullet a couple of weeks ago. I loved them, and think they would be excellent with a pulled pork sandwich. Easy to make ahead as well Here is the link http://recipes.egullet.org/recipes/r463.html
  14. I have the same knife block as you do. It is wonderful - easy to clean as the accordians come out and can be immersed in hot soapy water. It also holds a suprising number of knives. I don't remember where I got mine, but it was from a US on line distributor that was willing to ship to Canada. I had it recommended to me a couple of years ago on an egullet thread.
  15. Here is the link, I hope I posted this correctly. http://forums.egullet.org/index.php?showtopic=44015&hl= PH's lemon curd recipe is my favourite as well. It is highly addictive. A discussion starts about post 69 I think
  16. I too was at the West dinner on Monday evening. I enjoyed it immensely - both the great food and wine. I thought each course was well thought out and presented. I would have loved to have taken photos, but felt it was inappropriate for the occasion. The squash ravioli was absolutely sublime. I could have had an entire bowl of that. Question for Jamie and anyone else that may have been there - we were having a discussion at our table as to exactly where in the south of France the Henriques Rivesaltes Hors d'Age Domaine de Forca Real came from. We had 2 votes (including mine) for close to Banyuls, one for closer to Perignan and one abstainer. Tell me I was right
  17. Four of us ate at Don Francesco on Saturday night. I must say that I have walked by this restaurant many times and not given it a second thought. The two husbands in our group wanted to try it and not knowing much about it, I went with very little in the way of expectations. I started with the mussels which were done very well - plump, moist and a nice broth. Others in our group had the lobster bisque, which was pronounced very good, and the escargot. The escargot were fabulous...........a huge portion of tasty, tender morsels. No rubberiness at all. My husband and I shared the duck, which I can highly recommend. It was probably one of the best duck dishes I have eaten. It is slow roasted for hours and comes out meltingly tender. It almost has the silky quality of a good duck confit. The portion is huge - a whole duck carved tableside for two. The skin is crispy with great spices rubbed in. Served with potatoes and veg. $60 for two people. Others at our table had lasagne and the special of the night, seafood linguine. Pronounced very good by all. For dessert we were very full so our waiter brought us a varied selection of gelatos and sorbets and four spoons to share. It was a perfect ending to a very filling meal. The ambience is very "old" world. Personally I loved it. It is very comforting and homey on a winters night. The place was absolutely packed on a Saturday night, so I am assuming they have a regular following. To me this is a restaurant that has flown under the radar of many a foodie in Vancouver and needs to be brought out into the spotlight.
  18. Since I started this thread I have the duty to report back on by GBP effort. I made the cake last weekend and froze it in anticipation of an afterwork dinner party this Friday night. I thawed the cake the day of the party and made it into pudding Friday night. I served it with the sauce (I cut the sugar in half) and Dulce de Leche ice-cream. I don't know what it is about this dessert, but it is absolutely delicious and deeply soul satisfying. Everyone who ate it loved it. Unfortunately I do not have any pictures as it was inhaled by all present. Served with a 1989 Chateua St Jean Late Harvest Reisling it was all so, so good. Next time I hope to have the time to attempt the pumpkin ice cream as I do believe that is the perfect ice cream to go with the gingerbread. Thanks so much Neil for the receipe. You are my hero!
  19. The dinner party that I am making the gingerbread pudding for is after work next Friday. Because of time constraints I decided to make the cake ahead, freeze it and then make the pudding when I get home from work. When the cake came out of the oven we had to have a taste test to make sure that it was OK. It was warm,lovely and comforting on a cold rainy day. The cake is now 1/3 gone and I am contemplating having to make another........... The molasses I used was what I had in the house. The carton said "cooking molasses", but I have no idea what that means. In any event the cake is great. Now I have to figure out how to scale down the pumpkin ice cream recipe from the giant sized commercial proportions! PS - I used buttermilk instead of milk mainly because I had some in the fridge that needed using up. Since there was baking soda in the cake I thought it would be a good combo.
  20. Loved these posts. As chance would have it my husband has wanted to have dinner here for ages and we just make a reservation yesterday for a week Saturday. I will report back on the regular menu as DOV will be over.
  21. I want to make "Artichokes and Potatoes au Gratin" - p. 326 - for an after work dinner party. Due to time constraints I would need to make this a couple of days ahead. Can I do this - up to the point of running the dish under the broiler with the cream - or will the integrity of the dish be compromised?
  22. I have had this at the HSG when in Vancouver and loved it. There has been much discussion on this board surrounding this (now) famous pudding. The recipe has been posted here http://www.diningoutguide.com/ShowRecipe.aspx?ID=1 I want to make it this weekend and have a couple of questions: - the recipe calls for 1 cup molasses. I know there are a variety of types of molasses and strengths and I have no idea what to buy. Help? - Can the cake be made ahead, cooled completely and then made into the pudding? The receipe says to cool at room temperature for 20 minutes and then make into pudding. The only prolem is.............I won't have some of the fabulous ice cream available at the HSG to top it off!
  23. Marlene, I must be blind.........I could not see the Vancouver address on the web page - what is it?
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