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cew

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  1. Jaymes, thank you very much for checking into ICO. I've almost settled on going there because it seems that the cooking classes are really an integral part of the language program there, which sounds perfect for me. But in the interests of making fully informed decisions, Caroline, do you know how much it costs to take cooking lessons from Maria Ricaud? Thank you, everyone, for your suggestions. And keep them coming!
  2. Thank you for your suggestions. I wish I had just a little more money, but unfortunately it looks like every school in Cuernavaca is too expensive for me. I have been thinking about attending this school in Oaxaca, largely because it seems like such an incredible deal: http://www.instculturaloax.com.mx/workshops.html One of the things I like about it is that one of the afternoon workshops is a regional cooking class--I think I could attend every Monday through Thursday! Do you know/have you heard anything about this program?
  3. I'm thinking about doing intensive Spanish in Mexico for the month of August. I'd like to learn how to cook authentic & delicious Mexican food while I'm there, too. Do you have any ideas about the best place in Mexico to do this? Obviously, Oaxaca comes to mind ... some great language schools and the food is wonderful. Anywhere else?
  4. cew

    salted radish

    yes, i always assume that anything in a jar with vinegar will keep pretty much forever. but the salted radish just come by themselves in a plastic packet, no vinegar.
  5. cew

    salted radish

    Thanks, this was exactly the kind of information I was looking for. I'm going to try the salted radish in those wonderful Sichuan green beans (I remember seeing the Wild Ginger recipe somewhere on this site). By the way, how long can I keep the salted radish in the fridge before it spoils?
  6. What is the thinking behind releasing five new "How to Cook Everything" books at the same time? Are the recipes new? If so, how did you have time to develop and test them all! What do these books offer that the original does not?
  7. Thank you for participating in this Q&A. I really enjoy your columns in the New York Times. In the last couple of years I have noticed that you have been incorporating more Asian flavors and ingredients into your Minimalist recipes, which formerly were more oriented towards streamlining classic European and American dishes. Is this because you yourself have been more interested in cooking Asian or Asian-influenced food at home? Because you think that this cuisine is particularly well-suited to minimalist cooking? Or because you want to encourage your fans to try new things? In the fu
  8. cew

    a rump and a dozen

    I was thinking cab, I don't know why I wrote pinot. Still haven't figured out how to edit posts.... Anyway, thanks for your responses. I'm looking for clever/funny ways to pay off this bet ... that "Good Ordinary Claret" sounds perfect but I am in the U.S. Is there something comparable that is available to me in California? I also appreciate the historical insight -- I always wondered what exactly they were drinking when they brought out the claret in books. It did occur to me that I could pay off this bet with a case of Two-Buck Chuck ... I don't know if my friend would appreciate the joke
  9. cew

    a rump and a dozen

    My friend and I engaged in a classic English wager. The stakes were "a rump and a dozen" -- a rump of beef and a dozen bottles of claret. I lost. Now I have to buy my friend a bottle of claret (the stakes were modified in consideration of my limited pocketbook) and I have a couple of questions. Does claret = bordeaux = pinot noir? Do you have any suggestions for a good but reasonably priced bottle of claret? I would especially like to find something that has characteristics similar to the classic "claret" that English men--and I do mean "men"--would drink a hundred years ago when the ladi
  10. cew

    Dinner! 2003

    Friday: leftover khmer chicken curry. Later: Sapphire martinis and french fries (not homemade). Saturday: carnitas (thanks, Jaymes!) and guacomole. cline syrah. Sunday: potato, red pepper, and zucchini gratin. little more leftover curry. big glass of port for dessert.
  11. cew

    Dinner! 2003

    As always, this is quite a menu, Jinmyo! I join the chorus that wants to know more about the hiyayako tofu .... and the shattered chicken dish .... please? Last night, an impromptu dinner party cooked from Hot Sour Salty Sweet: Steamed dumplings of minced pork and salted radish, served with a shoyu/rice vinegar dipping sauce Khmer chicken curry Sauteed morning glories with garlic, fermented bean paste, and fish sauce Jasmine rice Water, Gewurtztramminer, and Two-Buck Chuck Mochi (purchased) for dessert Everything turned out great, it was a fun evening.
  12. cew

    salted radish

    Last night we made some steamed dumplings with minced pork and salted radish. Delicious! The salted radish added such a great flavor and texture (coriander roots didn't hurt either). Now I have half a package of salted radish to use up. Any ideas of what I can do with it?
  13. This is an interesting adjunct to the "how detailed should a recipe be?" thread. Here are a few comments from someone who has never gone to culinary school or worked in a professional kitchen and likes her recipes to be detailed, thank you very much! 1. -pan sear off presentation side until golden brown What is the "off presentation side"? I have never heard this term. Does it mean the side you do not want to present? 2. -remove from pan and place on baking sheet I assume with the presentation side up, so that means the golden brown side should be down? or up? 3. -baste fish and bake
  14. Marcella Hazan's recipe for tomato sauce with butter and onion is also delicious and very easy. Basically, you take a 28-oz. can of tomatoes, squeeze or cut the tomatoes into chunks, and simmer them with half an onion (peeled but not chopped) and 5 T of butter for 45 minutes, by which time the tomato pieces will have dissolved into a sweet, intensely tomatoey sauce. In the summer you can use an equivalent amount of fresh tomatoes: peel and seed, then add the chopped tomatoes with their juices.
  15. I don't have Thai Food but I recently acquired Hot Sour Salty Sweet and I LOVE this book. So far everything I've cooked from it has been fantastic. The instructions are so clear and easy to follow, yet the results taste far better than what you will get at most restaurants. I also like the regional approach. I find it helpful as an introductory resource, and I am happy to have great recipes for Vietnamese shrimp rolls and Thai curries, Yunnan greens and Cambodian fish soup, etc. etc., without buying lots of different books.
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